## Does Scuba Diving Affect Posterior Vitreous Detachment?

Introduction

Posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) is a common eye condition that occurs when the vitreous gel, which fills the space between the lens and the retina, separates from the retina. This can cause a variety of symptoms, including floaters, flashes of light, and blurred vision.

Scuba diving is a popular recreational activity that involves descending underwater with the aid of breathing apparatus. While scuba diving is generally considered to be a safe activity, there is some concern that it may increase the risk of PVD.

What is the Evidence?

There is some evidence to suggest that scuba diving may increase the risk of PVD. A study published in the journal “Ophthalmology” found that scuba divers were more likely to have PVD than non-divers. The study also found that the risk of PVD increased with the number of dives a person had completed.

Another study, published in the journal “Retina”, found that scuba divers were more likely to have PVD than swimmers. The study also found that the risk of PVD increased with the depth of the dives.

How Does Scuba Diving Increase the Risk of PVD?

It is believed that scuba diving may increase the risk of PVD by causing changes in the pressure inside the eye. When a person dives, the pressure inside the eye increases. This can cause the vitreous gel to pull away from the retina, which can lead to PVD.

Who is at Risk?

The risk of PVD from scuba diving is highest in people who are over the age of 50 and who have other risk factors for PVD, such as nearsightedness or a family history of PVD.

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What Can You Do to Reduce Your Risk?

There are a number of things you can do to reduce your risk of PVD from scuba diving, including:

Start diving slowly and gradually increase your depth and duration of dives. This will help to reduce the pressure on your eyes.
Use a mask that fits well and does not put pressure on your eyes.
Take breaks during your dives to give your eyes a chance to rest.
Stop diving if you experience any symptoms of PVD, such as floaters, flashes of light, or blurred vision.

Conclusion

While scuba diving may increase the risk of PVD, it is important to remember that the risk is still relatively low. By taking precautions to reduce your risk, you can enjoy scuba diving safely and without worry.

## Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What are the symptoms of PVD?

A: The symptoms of PVD can include:

Floaters
Flashes of light
Blurred vision
Difficulty seeing in low light
Distortion of vision

Q: How is PVD diagnosed?

A: PVD is diagnosed with a dilated eye exam. Your doctor will put drops in your eyes to widen your pupils and then use a special microscope to examine the inside of your eyes.

Q: What is the treatment for PVD?

A: There is no treatment for PVD. The symptoms usually go away on their own within a few months. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair a tear in the retina that has been caused by PVD.

Q: Can I still scuba dive if I have PVD?

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A: Yes, you can still scuba dive if you have PVD. However, you should take precautions to reduce your risk of further damage to your eyes, such as using a mask that fits well and does not put pressure on your eyes, and taking breaks during your dives to give your eyes a chance to rest.

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