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Feeling Sick After Scuba Diving? Here’s What You Need to Know

Are you feeling sick after scuba diving? Denial will not do any good. The moment you feel something off after a plunge, you should seek medical attention right away. Sickness after diving is something divers should never shrug off as mere discomfort. Some of the causes of this sickness could be life-threatening if not addressed right away.

Your feeling of sickness after a dive could be due to a lot of things. Some aren’t serious while others should be treated right away. No matter what it is, you should always have it diagnosed properly.

Why am I feeling sick after scuba diving?

feeling sick after scuba diving

A lot of things can cause sickness after diving. The following can be your condition:

Motion sickness

The least serious condition behind your sickness after a dive is motion sickness. If it’s your first time to dive, seasickness can be a factor. Some individuals are resistant to motion sickness while others can keep experiencing it after several trips.

A mismatch of sensory inputs is the common cause of seasickness. What you physically see and what you feel doesn’t match. When the brain fails to resolve this confusion, motion sickness occurs.

The key here is to choose a spot on the boat with the least vertical acceleration. If not avoidable, you can take medications before going on a dive. Still, most of these drugs have side effects.

Symptoms of seasickness after diving

  • Dizziness or spinning
  • Pale skin
  • Weakness and excessive yawning
  • Nausea
  • Increased salivation
  • Feeling of falling

On most cases, motion sickness doesn’t require serious medical attention. While traveling on a dive boat, it’s best to keep your eyes steady on one distance.

To ease motion sickness, you can take oral medications for temporary relief. Take note that these drugs should be taken before you hop the boat. The following are some of the medications you can take. If you have underlying conditions, you should ask the advice of a doctor.

If you’re already vomiting and can’t contain medication, your best bet is a suppository like Phenergen or Compazine.

In this video, scuba diving instructor Laura Parke tells us how to avoid sea sickness:

Vertigo

Another possible culprit behind the reason you’re feeling sick just after scuba diving is vertigo. It can be that you feel like you’re spinning or it’s the world around you that’s taking a whirl. This is due to the imbalance between your right and left ear, which can take place during the descend and ascent.

Usually, vertigo will last for 20 seconds during or after the dive. But if it persists for hours, and even days, you should consult a doctor right away.

Take note that inner ear infections can also trigger vertigo. It’s possible that your dive just pushed the condition to manifest.

Experiencing vertigo while underwater can be very scary. If you feel this during descend, you should signal to your diving buddy right away to abort the plunge.

In this video, Dr. Frans Cronje from DAN Southern Africa discusses vertigo and its relation to scuba diving:

The following are the signs of vertigo:

  • Spinning or dizziness
  • Ringing in the ears
  • Nausea
  • Problems with balance
  • Difficulty focusing the eyes
  • Sweating

You can use some home remedies if your vertigo is still bearable. The following are some of the effective solutions to this problem:

  • Epley maneuver
  • Brandt-Daroff exercise
  • Semont-Toupet maneuver

Decompression illness (DCI)

Decompression illness is one of the dreaded effects of diving. This can be a very serious condition that if not addressed right away can lead to fatal consequences.

If you feel intense fatigue, nausea, rash, itchy skin, joint pain, and headache, you should head straight to the hospital. Severe cases include memory loss, muscle weakness, paralysis, and eventually, cardiac arrest.

Take note that decompression can take place even hours after the plunge. If you feel symptoms of decompression sickness, you can call the Divers Alert Network hotline at +1-919-684-9111.

To further understand decompression illness, here’s an informative video from TED-Ed discussing the changes our body undergoes during a dive:

Decompression illness is actually a blanket term for two specific conditions: arterial gas embolism (AGE) and decompression sickness (DCS).

Arterial gas embolism (AGE)

This condition is caused by over-pressurization of the lungs. The air is forced into the lungs in an abnormal fashion, which could lead to fatal conditions. The worst cases of AGE include loss of consciousness, apnea, and cardiac arrest.

If treated on its onset, divers can recover from AGE. However, if the case is worst and not addressed immediately, it could lead to permanent damage to the diver.

Decompression sickness (DCS)

Unlike arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness is caused by the formation of nitrogen bubbles in the bloodstream. It’s caused by improper and lack of decompression during ascent.

DCS is also called ‘the bends’ among divers and the most common reason why you ma feel sick after scuba diving. Take note that it’s different from narcosis. The latter happens when the diver inhales too much nitrogen that it starts to become mildly anesthetic. A dive has to be aborted when the diver experiences narcosis.

In worst cases, DCS can lead to difficulty urinating, shortness of breath, coughing up blood, vertigo, unusual behavior, and visual disturbances.

DCS has to be treated right away through the help of a medical professional. Also, stay hydrated and avoid any alcoholic beverages. Usually, doctors will administer 100% oxygen to restore the oxygen level in the blood.

Symptoms you shouldn’t ignore after diving

If you’re feeling unwell after scuba diving, you should always see a doctor. No matter how worse or mild the symptoms are, it’s safer to consult a medical practitioner for proper diagnosis and treatment. Should you experience the following symptoms after diving, consult a doctor right away:

1. Confusion

Confusion can be a sign of various underwater problems. You could be on the verge of narcosis, decompression sickness, and other related condition. Don’t wait for confusion to worsen before you signal to your diving buddies.

2. Chest pains

Remember this: heart attack is the leading cause of death underwater among divers. The pressure of diving, together with other factors, can trigger cardiac arrest.

If you don’t have any heart problems, you could be at the onset of pulmonary barotrauma. This over-inflation of the lungs can cause deadly damages to your internal organs if you don’t descend properly.

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3. Tingling sensation

If you feel tingling sensations on your body together with another symptom in this list, you should signal for an emergency ascent. It could be a sign of decompression sickness or looming paralysis.

However, not all tingling sensations should be a cause of concern underwater. Your hands and feet can have tingling sensations if you dive in cold water. Just watch out for a second symptom.

4. Mottling

It’s quite normal to have raisin-like skin on the hands after soaking underwater for long. However, if you’re starting to have blotchy discoloration that’s marble-like or mottled, you should be concerned. This is called skin bends, which is usually followed by the feeling of bugs creeping in your skin.

Minor cases of mottling don’t require special treatment. However, if the discoloration worsens and you’re not feeling well, you must seek medical help.

5. Belly pain

Belly pain characterized by corset-like tightness can happen as early as five minutes after your plunge. When you experience this symptom, you must re-compress quickly to prevent severe spinal cord injuries. Take note that within minutes, this condition can turn serious.

6. Dizziness

Any symptom that affects your ability to stay focus should be a cause of concern. Dizziness can be a sign of narcosis, decompression sickness, and vertigo. All of these require immediate attention before it makes a dangerous turn.

7. Vision changes

If you start to have a blurry vision while diving, you must signal to your diving buddy right away. It can be a sign of intraocular barotrauma. This can cause significant pain and light sensitivity if not treated right away.

What to do if you have these symptoms?

The first thing you have to do is seek medical help. Early signs of sickness after diving may appear mild, but it can progress and cause serious conditions.

For minor symptoms, you can do some home remedies. However, if your condition doesn’t improve, you should see a doctor right away.

When in doubt, you should always consult the professionals. Not all sickness after diving can be cured with home remedies.

How to avoid sickness after diving

1. Don’t go with an empty stomach

If you’re prone to seasickness, you shouldn’t ride the boat in an empty stomach. Have a filling meal an hour before the dive. Also, avoid acidic and greasy food as this may increase your risk of motion sickness. You should also avoid cigarettes and alcohol before the dive.

2. Stay hydrated

No matter what you’re doing, a well-hydrated body is healthy. It will also keep your tummy full to reduce the symptoms of motion sickness.

3. Avoid long dives

The longer you stay underwater, the higher the chances that you’ll develop a sickness. If you plan to dive on consecutive days, keep your plunges short to allow your body to recover.

4. Don’t hesitate to abort a dive

If you feel uneasy or on the verge of any of the symptoms above, don’t hesitate to abort the dive. Signal to your diving buddy for an emergency ascent. If you let the symptoms linger during the dive, your condition will worsen. Remember that the building pressure will make things worse.

5. Don’t dive if you’re not feeling well

If you’re in good shape before the dive, it’s never too late to abort the mission. Being unfit only increases your risk of developing sickness during and after the plunge. Your fellow divers will surely understand if you’re not going to join them. So if you’re not feeling well after scuba diving, don’t go for another plunge.

6. Avoid holding your breath

You should continue proper breathing as you descend or ascend in the water. Holding your breath will only cause pulmonary barotrauma. In worst cases, your lung may explode and have irreversible consequences.

Holding your breath is one of the most dangerous things you can ever do while diving.

7. Dive with a buddy

No matter how skilled a diver you are, you should always have a buddy when diving. Should anything happen underwater, there’s someone to rescue or watch over you. You should also do the same for your diving buddy. The buddy system is strictly observed by all divers for a very good reason: it has saved many lives already.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How long does decompression sickness linger?

A: If the DCS doesn’t have any neurological complications, the diver’s condition will improve between two and seven days. However, serious cases would take up to four weeks with the right treatment. It may take longer for some, depending on the extent of the sickness and the underlying conditions of the person.

Q: At what level will I likely experience nitrogen narcosis?

A: Usually, divers will experience narcosis at depths of beyond 100 feet. Still, narcosis can occur in shallow depths of around 33 feet. Take note that narcosis becomes worse when nitrogen inhalation is paired with intense underwater pressure.

Q: What are the most common diving emergencies?

A: Some of the medical conditions associated with diving include barotrauma, decompression sickness, vertigo, and marine envenomation. All of these conditions require immediate medical attention.

Q: Will I have vertigo when water gets into my ear?

A: It’s possible to experience signs of vertigo if fluids build up in your inner ear. If the fluids cause infection, the symptoms of vertigo will persist. The onset of vertigo may cause tinnitus, hearing loss, and fullness in the ear.

Q: Will vertigo after diving go away on its own?

A: If the vertigo is mild, it can go away on its own within 24 hours. However, if ear infection is the culprit, it may take for the symptoms to subside. It’s best to see a doctor for the right medication that will speed up your recovery.

Final words

Feeling sick after scuba diving should always be taken seriously. The moment you feel something wrong underwater, you should ascend with your buddy. Also, the help of a doctor is indispensable. You should seek the help of a medical professional for proper diagnosis and treatment of diving-related sickness.

Find Out Medical Conditions That Might Stop You From Scuba Diving

Find Out Medical Conditions That Might Stop You From Scuba Diving

Scuba diving in the beautiful marine is pretty safe compared to most extreme sports. And the security gear is even safer than skydiving’s double safety mechanism.

There’s one caveat, though – while injuries are rare in scuba diving, the sheer atmospheric pressure and loads of other physics-related stuff interacting with your body in deep waters can be uncomfortable for an unhealthy person.

In layman’s terms, scuba diving is a physically and mentally strenuous activity that isn’t for everyone. I’ll explain in detail – then we’ll discuss common medical conditions that prevent you from doing scuba.

What makes scuba diving different from other extreme sports?

According to the 2020 study, Medical Examination of the Recreational SCUBA Diver, “SCUBA diving is an enjoyable and safe sport when it is pursued by healthy, well-trained, disciplined and well-equipped individuals who are comfortable in the water. Since the sport diver is out for recreation, there is no need to take chances or shortcuts with any of these factors.”

Scuba diving is one of the most demanding sports for an unhealthy person because of one factor – water is denser than air. You can get away with a slight error with skydiving and other “above ground” extreme sports, but not with scuba diving.

In scuba diving, your body faces more pressure and exhaustion the deeper you go below sea level. Even with a full oxygen tank, your body deals with various forces like changing atmospheric pressure, which takes a massive toll on your inner ears and lungs.

That said, a relatively healthy human body can easily withstand most of these phenomena. Where exactly do we draw the line for the eligibility criteria?

Who should not go scuba diving?

People with medical issues related to lungs, heart, and brain should not go technical diving. Common conditions include asthma, cardiovascular diseases, pneumothorax, seizures, and diabetes. They may get away with recreational scuba diving if the issues are mild.

Medical Conditions That Stop You From Scuba Diving

Dozens of medical conditions could potentially stop you from scuba diving or other sports. The human body is complicated. So, to make this influx of information easy for you, I’ve categorized the conditions into eight sections.

1. Neurological Problems

People with neurological problems, especially the spinal cord or the peripheral nerves connecting the spinal cord to the brain, aren’t allowed scuba diving. Individuals with a history of seizures also fall in this category.

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What medical conditions can stop you from scuba diving?

Spinal Cord

The strictness of these policies is subjective and varies among different locations. Some scuba diving instructors won’t allow you to dive even if you have a clearance certificate from a medical professional.

Scuba diving is not allowed for a person suffering from epilepsy. If you have been off medication and without a seizure for over 5 years, you might be considered fit to dive. For patients with nocturnal seizures, you have to be off medication for at least 3 years.

These strict rules are enforced because you can potentially have a seizure at any time, even if the possibility is super low.

Major Neurological Conditions:

  • Seizures (less than 5 years)
  • Epilepsy
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Paralysis
  • Cerebrovascular insufficiency
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Aneurysm
  • TIA strokes

2. Cardiovascular (Heart) Problems

Scuba diving is no walk in the park – the change in pressure not only affects your lungs (breathing) but also your heart (blood pressure). Diving can be difficult if you have high blood pressure or other cardiovascular problems.

For example, you can’t scuba dive if you have persistent hypertension, chest pains, and palpitations in addition to high blood pressure. A medical clearance certificate is almost always required in these situations. You can also get the certificate as a precautionary step if you have had cases of heart murmur and premature death in the direct family.

As for the hematological problems, you need to be careful as it increases the chances of getting decompression illness (DCI). It’s recommended to wait 6 months to a year after a heart attack or heart surgery before scuba diving.

Major Cardiovascular Conditions:

  • Coronary artery/heart disease
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Chronic immersion pulmonary edema
  • High blood pressure
  • Implanted cardiac defibrillator
  • Pulmonary hypertension

More minor conditions include using a pacemaker and a single isolated case of pulmonary edema. Hematological problems include chronic anemia.

3. Mental Health & Behavioural Problems

This one is quite tricky because diagnosing behavioral and other mental health problems aren’t cut and dry. Additionally, you won’t be barred from having just about any random mental health condition.

The issue is the seriousness of the problem because that directly correlates to your medication. For example, you should NOT take psychotropic medications while scuba diving. If so, you’ll need medical clearance from a psychiatrist.

What medical conditions can stop you from scuba diving?

Scuba Diving can feel claustrophobic

As I said, these conditions don’t matter as much as their intensity does since so many of these are very hard to evaluate for a scuba diving situation.

For instance, if you have severe depression, bipolar disorder, or psychosis, you might get medical clearance to scuba dive, but it may put your well-being at high risk.

Major Mental Health Conditions:

  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Severe Depression
  • Panic Attacks
  • Severe issues of drug and alcohol abuse
  • Claustrophobia/agoraphobia

4. Respiratory & Pulmonary Problems

You shouldn’t go scuba diving if you have asthma, as the conditions that might lead to an asthma attack are inherent to scuba diving. These attacks can tighten the airflow by constricting the muscles, which isn’t ideal underwater because it can lead to drowning.

Other pulmonary ailments are just as dangerous because they place a tremendous toll on your lungs and other parts of the respiratory system. This strain can often result in pulmonary over-inflation and alveolar ruptures – both of which can be fatal underwater.

An alveolar rupture is dangerous because it can accidentally bypass air in the bloodstream, leading to an arterial gas embolism (AGE). And an embolism like that underwater is the recipe for a stroke attack.

Major Respiratory Conditions:

  • Pneumothorax
  • Pulmonary hypertension
  • Asthma
  • Thoracic surgery
  • Lung disease

5. Gastrointestinal & Metabolic Problems

It might sound far-fetched, but diabetes can prevent you from scuba diving. Severely diabetic or obese (BMI above 30) individuals usually can’t scuba dive in the United States because it can be fatal if your blood sugar levels are off.

Also, gastrointestinal problems / conditions are an absolute NO for scuba diving. Any gastrointestinal condition that leads to acid reflux, vomiting, perforation, and diarrhea will immediately get you off the boat – and for good reason because even one of these outcomes is enough to drown you.

Ps…pregnancy also prevents you from scuba diving.

6. Cancer Problems

You should not attempt scuba diving while on chemotherapy because chemo and radiation therapy are exhausting and bring your stamina levels to zero. Ideally, wait until after you’re fully recovered from the effects of your therapy.

Since cancer isn’t an exact problem, the scuba restrictions are variable as well. People with brain, lung, or colon cancer MIGHT have to leave scuba diving forever. Comparatively, individuals with other cancer types only require a medical clearance certificate to dive, provided that they’re healthy and have enough stamina.

7. Other Miscellaneous Problems

Musculoskeletal problems such as amputated legs and scoliosis can prevent you from scuba diving because you need the ability to move around, especially in colder waters with such heavy gear. Other such issues include disc prolapse, aseptic necrosis, and severe back pain.

You also need to be otolaryngological healthy to scuba dive. Since inner ears are inflexible like solids, they’re susceptible to rupturing as you go deeper. It’s also why you shouldn’t take scuba dives until sometime after inner ear surgery.

What should you not do after scuba diving?

As long as we’re on the topic of preventing scuba mishaps, here are the things you should not do after scuba diving.

1. Don’t go mountain climbing, skydiving, or other such activities

You must know by now that change in altitude has varying yet astounding impacts. Mountain climbing in the first 24 hours of scuba diving can even result in decompression sickness.

The same goes for skydiving, zip-lining, and related activities. Stick to the ground for the first 24 hours and avoid changing the elevation further. Although, you can skydive (and mountain climb, etc.) prior to scuba diving.

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2. Don’t consume alcohol

Avoid alcohol (or at least don’t drink heavily) during the first 24 hours. Avoid any activity that causes dehydration because it also leads to decompression sickness.

3. Avoid massages right after diving

You may want that relaxing massage after a tiresome day of scuba diving. Still, you should ideally avoid it for the first 24 hours. And if you can’t avoid it, just get the normal one – deep tissue massages should be avoided at all costs. Deep tissue massages can mask the symptoms of decompression sickness and lead to a misdiagnosis.

  • Categories

I got into extreme sports about 20 years ago and am a die-hard adrenaline junkie. Just like in business, I choose my outdoor adventures based on how much they scare me. My goal is to share the lessons I’ve learned over the past couple of decades braving the unknown to encourage you to do the same.

Disclaimer

All content cited is derived from their respective sources. If you believe we have used your copyrighted content without permission, send me an email at [email protected] and I’ll remove it immediately.

About Us

Elevated Adventurer is your go-to sherpa for all things adventure sports and outdoor exploration. Here you’ll learn everything you need to know about your favorite outdoor sports from rock climbing and scuba to skydiving and extreme sports.

Find Out Medical Conditions That Might Stop You From Scuba Diving

Find Out Medical Conditions That Might Stop You From Scuba Diving

Scuba diving in the beautiful marine is pretty safe compared to most extreme sports. And the security gear is even safer than skydiving’s double safety mechanism.

There’s one caveat, though – while injuries are rare in scuba diving, the sheer atmospheric pressure and loads of other physics-related stuff interacting with your body in deep waters can be uncomfortable for an unhealthy person.

In layman’s terms, scuba diving is a physically and mentally strenuous activity that isn’t for everyone. I’ll explain in detail – then we’ll discuss common medical conditions that prevent you from doing scuba.

What makes scuba diving different from other extreme sports?

According to the 2020 study, Medical Examination of the Recreational SCUBA Diver, “SCUBA diving is an enjoyable and safe sport when it is pursued by healthy, well-trained, disciplined and well-equipped individuals who are comfortable in the water. Since the sport diver is out for recreation, there is no need to take chances or shortcuts with any of these factors.”

Scuba diving is one of the most demanding sports for an unhealthy person because of one factor – water is denser than air. You can get away with a slight error with skydiving and other “above ground” extreme sports, but not with scuba diving.

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In scuba diving, your body faces more pressure and exhaustion the deeper you go below sea level. Even with a full oxygen tank, your body deals with various forces like changing atmospheric pressure, which takes a massive toll on your inner ears and lungs.

That said, a relatively healthy human body can easily withstand most of these phenomena. Where exactly do we draw the line for the eligibility criteria?

Who should not go scuba diving?

People with medical issues related to lungs, heart, and brain should not go technical diving. Common conditions include asthma, cardiovascular diseases, pneumothorax, seizures, and diabetes. They may get away with recreational scuba diving if the issues are mild.

Medical Conditions That Stop You From Scuba Diving

Dozens of medical conditions could potentially stop you from scuba diving or other sports. The human body is complicated. So, to make this influx of information easy for you, I’ve categorized the conditions into eight sections.

1. Neurological Problems

People with neurological problems, especially the spinal cord or the peripheral nerves connecting the spinal cord to the brain, aren’t allowed scuba diving. Individuals with a history of seizures also fall in this category.

What medical conditions can stop you from scuba diving?

Spinal Cord

The strictness of these policies is subjective and varies among different locations. Some scuba diving instructors won’t allow you to dive even if you have a clearance certificate from a medical professional.

Scuba diving is not allowed for a person suffering from epilepsy. If you have been off medication and without a seizure for over 5 years, you might be considered fit to dive. For patients with nocturnal seizures, you have to be off medication for at least 3 years.

These strict rules are enforced because you can potentially have a seizure at any time, even if the possibility is super low.

Major Neurological Conditions:

  • Seizures (less than 5 years)
  • Epilepsy
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Paralysis
  • Cerebrovascular insufficiency
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Aneurysm
  • TIA strokes

2. Cardiovascular (Heart) Problems

Scuba diving is no walk in the park – the change in pressure not only affects your lungs (breathing) but also your heart (blood pressure). Diving can be difficult if you have high blood pressure or other cardiovascular problems.

For example, you can’t scuba dive if you have persistent hypertension, chest pains, and palpitations in addition to high blood pressure. A medical clearance certificate is almost always required in these situations. You can also get the certificate as a precautionary step if you have had cases of heart murmur and premature death in the direct family.

As for the hematological problems, you need to be careful as it increases the chances of getting decompression illness (DCI). It’s recommended to wait 6 months to a year after a heart attack or heart surgery before scuba diving.

Major Cardiovascular Conditions:

  • Coronary artery/heart disease
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Chronic immersion pulmonary edema
  • High blood pressure
  • Implanted cardiac defibrillator
  • Pulmonary hypertension

More minor conditions include using a pacemaker and a single isolated case of pulmonary edema. Hematological problems include chronic anemia.

3. Mental Health & Behavioural Problems

This one is quite tricky because diagnosing behavioral and other mental health problems aren’t cut and dry. Additionally, you won’t be barred from having just about any random mental health condition.

The issue is the seriousness of the problem because that directly correlates to your medication. For example, you should NOT take psychotropic medications while scuba diving. If so, you’ll need medical clearance from a psychiatrist.

What medical conditions can stop you from scuba diving?

Scuba Diving can feel claustrophobic

As I said, these conditions don’t matter as much as their intensity does since so many of these are very hard to evaluate for a scuba diving situation.

For instance, if you have severe depression, bipolar disorder, or psychosis, you might get medical clearance to scuba dive, but it may put your well-being at high risk.

Major Mental Health Conditions:

  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Severe Depression
  • Panic Attacks
  • Severe issues of drug and alcohol abuse
  • Claustrophobia/agoraphobia

4. Respiratory & Pulmonary Problems

You shouldn’t go scuba diving if you have asthma, as the conditions that might lead to an asthma attack are inherent to scuba diving. These attacks can tighten the airflow by constricting the muscles, which isn’t ideal underwater because it can lead to drowning.

Other pulmonary ailments are just as dangerous because they place a tremendous toll on your lungs and other parts of the respiratory system. This strain can often result in pulmonary over-inflation and alveolar ruptures – both of which can be fatal underwater.

An alveolar rupture is dangerous because it can accidentally bypass air in the bloodstream, leading to an arterial gas embolism (AGE). And an embolism like that underwater is the recipe for a stroke attack.

Major Respiratory Conditions:

  • Pneumothorax
  • Pulmonary hypertension
  • Asthma
  • Thoracic surgery
  • Lung disease

5. Gastrointestinal & Metabolic Problems

It might sound far-fetched, but diabetes can prevent you from scuba diving. Severely diabetic or obese (BMI above 30) individuals usually can’t scuba dive in the United States because it can be fatal if your blood sugar levels are off.

Also, gastrointestinal problems / conditions are an absolute NO for scuba diving. Any gastrointestinal condition that leads to acid reflux, vomiting, perforation, and diarrhea will immediately get you off the boat – and for good reason because even one of these outcomes is enough to drown you.

Ps…pregnancy also prevents you from scuba diving.

6. Cancer Problems

You should not attempt scuba diving while on chemotherapy because chemo and radiation therapy are exhausting and bring your stamina levels to zero. Ideally, wait until after you’re fully recovered from the effects of your therapy.

Since cancer isn’t an exact problem, the scuba restrictions are variable as well. People with brain, lung, or colon cancer MIGHT have to leave scuba diving forever. Comparatively, individuals with other cancer types only require a medical clearance certificate to dive, provided that they’re healthy and have enough stamina.

7. Other Miscellaneous Problems

Musculoskeletal problems such as amputated legs and scoliosis can prevent you from scuba diving because you need the ability to move around, especially in colder waters with such heavy gear. Other such issues include disc prolapse, aseptic necrosis, and severe back pain.

You also need to be otolaryngological healthy to scuba dive. Since inner ears are inflexible like solids, they’re susceptible to rupturing as you go deeper. It’s also why you shouldn’t take scuba dives until sometime after inner ear surgery.

What should you not do after scuba diving?

As long as we’re on the topic of preventing scuba mishaps, here are the things you should not do after scuba diving.

1. Don’t go mountain climbing, skydiving, or other such activities

You must know by now that change in altitude has varying yet astounding impacts. Mountain climbing in the first 24 hours of scuba diving can even result in decompression sickness.

The same goes for skydiving, zip-lining, and related activities. Stick to the ground for the first 24 hours and avoid changing the elevation further. Although, you can skydive (and mountain climb, etc.) prior to scuba diving.

Quick & Easy Guide to Preparing Food for a Multi-Day Hike

Hiking

2. Don’t consume alcohol

Avoid alcohol (or at least don’t drink heavily) during the first 24 hours. Avoid any activity that causes dehydration because it also leads to decompression sickness.

3. Avoid massages right after diving

You may want that relaxing massage after a tiresome day of scuba diving. Still, you should ideally avoid it for the first 24 hours. And if you can’t avoid it, just get the normal one – deep tissue massages should be avoided at all costs. Deep tissue massages can mask the symptoms of decompression sickness and lead to a misdiagnosis.

  • Categories

I got into extreme sports about 20 years ago and am a die-hard adrenaline junkie. Just like in business, I choose my outdoor adventures based on how much they scare me. My goal is to share the lessons I’ve learned over the past couple of decades braving the unknown to encourage you to do the same.

Disclaimer

All content cited is derived from their respective sources. If you believe we have used your copyrighted content without permission, send me an email at [email protected] and I’ll remove it immediately.

About Us

Elevated Adventurer is your go-to sherpa for all things adventure sports and outdoor exploration. Here you’ll learn everything you need to know about your favorite outdoor sports from rock climbing and scuba to skydiving and extreme sports.

Source https://www.underwatermag.com/feeling-sick-after-scuba-diving/

Source https://elevatedadventurer.com/find-out-medical-conditions-that-might-stop-you-from-scuba-diving/

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