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Ultimate Yellowstone Itinerary: Best Way to Spend 1 to 5 Days in Yellowstone

If you are planning your trip to Yellowstone National Park, this is a great place to start. There are many different ways to plan the “perfect Yellowstone itinerary,” depending on your interests and how much time you have.

Yellowstone is the largest national park outside of Alaska. With over two million acres of land, five park entrances, numerous geyser basins to visit, and scenic drives through valleys filled with elk and bison, there is A LOT to do here.

Ideally, you need at least three or four days to visit Yellowstone National Park. However, if you are short on time, you can get to the main highlights, even if you just have a day or two.

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Record Floods in Yellowstone

On June 12, 2022, Yellowstone and northern Montana had record floods. These floods washed aways portions of the roads between Gardiner, Montana and the north entrance of Yellowstone and roads near the northeast entrance of the park.

These floods altered the landscapes of Yellowstone and some roads are expected to be closed for an extended period of time.

At the time that I am updating this, the north and south loops of Yellowstone are open. The road between Gardiner and Mammoth is closed, as is the Northeast Entrance of the park.

As of July 2, the park cancelled the Alternating License Plate System. Visitors can enter the park on any day they like, regardless of license plate number. Currently, there is no timed entry reservation system in effect, but I recommend getting updates on the official website, just in case this changes.

Stay Updated about Park Conditions

Conditions are constantly changing in the park and will continue to do so throughout the summer. I plan to keep this article updated but the best place to go for current conditions is the official National Park Service website.

About this Yellowstone Itinerary

This Yellowstone itinerary works best during the months of June through October. From early November through late-May, many of the park roads will be closed due to snowfall. It’s still possible to visit the park in the winter, but you will get around by snowmobile or snow coach, which of course will be a much different experience than the summer months.

With that being said, you should know that crowds are huge during the summer months (especially July and August). In 2021, Yellowstone was the 3rd most visited park in the USA, receiving 4.9 million visitors. Expect major difficulties finding a parking space midday and be prepared to share walking trails with many other visitors.

If you plan to visit Yellowstone National Park for at least three days, we recommend staying in two different locations. Yes, it can be a hassle packing and unpacking, but Yellowstone is so large that switching accommodations can minimize travel time in the park. I give recommendations on where to stay in each itinerary. However, if you want to stay in one place for your entire visit, Canyon Village is the most centrally located village in Yellowstone.

A Quick Geography Lesson

Yellowstone is the second largest US national park outside of Alaska. With over 2 million acres of land and 5 park entrances, this place is massive.

Yellowstone National Park is primarily located in Wyoming, although it does spill over, just a little bit, into Idaho and Montana.

If you look at the map of Yellowstone below, you will see that the network of roads inside the park forms a figure of eight. The main loop is called Grand Loop Road. Bisecting this loop, and making the park roads resemble a figure of eight, is Norris Canyon Road. The majority of sights you will visit are located on Grand Loop Road.

Yellowstone Map 2022 Flood Update

I modified this nps.gov map to highlight Grand Loop Road, the park entrances, and the main sights in Yellowstone. The yellow lines are the road closures (at the time of the most recent update of this article) and the pink lines are the roads that are currently open.

There are five park entrances, one on each side of the park (north, east, south, and west), with an additional entrance on the north side. Because of the park’s location, and the multiple entrances, it makes an awesome road trip destination. A visit to Yellowstone is usually combined with Grand Teton National Park, Devils Tower and Mount Rushmore, and Glacier National Park.

It takes three to five days to see and do everything inside of the park. If you are staying for 3 or more days, I recommend staying at two different locations in Yellowstone to minimize driving time. You can get recommendations on where to stay in our Where to Stay in Yellowstone article.

Best Things to Do in Yellowstone

Here is a list of the best things to do in Yellowstone:

  • Old Faithful & Upper Geyser Basin
  • Grand Prismatic Spring & Midway Geyser Basin
  • Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone
  • Wildlife sightings in Hayden and Lamar Valleys
  • Norris Geyser Basin
  • Mammoth Hot Springs
  • Go for a hike (Mt. Washburn & Fairy Falls are popular options)

The wildlife spottings in Yellowstone are incredible and every day offers a different experience. The best time of day to see the bison, elk, and bear are early and late in the day, so plan your visits to Hayden Valley and Lamar Valley during these times. But it is possible to spot wildlife anywhere in the park, so always be on the lookout.

Things to Do in Yellowstone

How Many Days Do You Need in Yellowstone?

You need a minimum of three full days to see the top sights in Yellowstone. Since Yellowstone is so large, you will potentially spend several hours each day driving from sight to sight. Add in extra time for wildlife sightings, animal traffic jams, and maybe even circling the parking lots midday for an empty space.

If you want to thoroughly explore Yellowstone, I recommend spending at least four to five days here. That’s plenty of time to visit the top sights without feeling like you are in a race.

How to Get to Yellowstone

Yellowstone National Park is located in the northwest corner of Wyoming. Here are the distances and driving times from nearby airports:

  • Idaho Falls Regional Airport, Idaho: 110 miles, 2 hours
  • Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, Montana: 80 miles, 1.5 hours
  • Yellowstone Airport, West Entrance of Yellowstone: 3 miles, 10 minutes
  • Yellowstone Regional Airport, Cody, Wyoming: 55 miles, 1.25 hours
  • Jackson Hole Airport, Jackson, Wyoming: 70 miles, 1.5 hour
  • Salt Lake City International Airport, Utah: 325 miles, 5 hours
  • Rapid City Regional Airport, South Dakota: 440 miles, 7.5 hours

Both Yellowstone Airport and Yellowstone Regional Airport are very small airports, so your options will be limited. You might have better luck finding convenient and economical flights at Bozeman, Idaho Falls, and Jackson Hole. We usually fly into Salt Lake City and visit Grand Teton National Park on the drive up to Yellowstone.

Yellowstone is a very popular road trip destination. Here are nearby travel destinations which you can visit before or after Yellowstone:

  • Grand Teton National Park: 60 miles, 1.5 hours
  • Jackson, Wyoming: 80 miles, 2 hours
  • Cody, Wyoming: 80 miles, 1.5 hours
  • Devils Tower, Wyoming: 375 miles, 7 hours
  • Mount Rushmore & Rapid City, South Dakota: 450 miles, 8 hours
  • Glacier National Park: 380 miles, 6 hours

Note: This driving distances and times are estimates and will vary according to your starting/ending location inside of Yellowstone National Park.

If you have plans to visit Yellowstone National Park on a road trip with Devils Tower, Mount Rushmore and/or the Black Hills of South Dakota, you have several scenic drives to choose from that cross Wyoming. In our guide about how to drive from Yellowstone to Mount Rushmore, we cover the two routes that cross the Bighorn Mountians: Cloud Peak Skyway and Bighorn Scenic Byway.

One Day Yellowstone Itinerary

Where should you go if this is your first visit to Yellowstone and you only have one day? In my opinion, the must-see sights for a first-timer are Old Faithful, the Grand Prismatic Spring, the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, and a drive through either Hayden Valley or Lamar Valley to spot wildlife.

If you only have one day, most likely you are on a road trip through the USA. Most people visit Yellowstone on a big road trip that includes Grand Teton National Park. If that is your plan, you can start in Grand Teton, hit the main sights in Yellowstone, and end the day in either Mammoth, West Yellowstone, or in one of the lodges inside of the park.

Below is an itinerary that starts in Grand Teton and ends in central/north Yellowstone. We also have an article with six different ways to spend one day in Yellowstone National Park . This article includes many different routes through the park to fit your road trip itinerary.

Here is a map if you start in Grand Teton and end in Mammoth (but it also works if you are traveling in the opposite direction).

How to Use This Map: Click the tab in the top left hand corner of the map to view the layers (places to go and the driving route). You can click the check marks to hide or show layers. If you click the icons on the map, you can get more information about each point of interest.

If you click the star next to the title of the map, this map will be added to your Google Maps account. To view it on your phone or computer, open Google Maps, click the menu button, go to “Your Places,” click Maps, and you will see this map on your list.

One Day Yellowstone Itinerary

Here is a sample one day Yellowstone itinerary. All times are approximate, to give you an idea of how to plan your time.

7 am: Drive from Jackson/Grand Teton National Park to Yellowstone. From Jackson, it is a 60-mile drive to the south entrance of Yellowstone and takes approximately one hour and fifteen minutes (95 miles, 2.25 hours to Old Faithful).

9:30 am: Old Faithful. Old Faithful is the world’s most famous geyser. It erupts every hour and half, give or take ten minutes. While you are here, you can also explore the Upper Geyser Basin. A visit to Old Faithful and Upper Geyser Basin typically lasts two hours.

Old Faithful Yellowstone Itinerary

Old Faithful | Yellowstone Itinerary

Yellowstone Boardwalk Trail

Boardwalk trail on the Upper Geyser Basin | Yellowstone Itinerary

12:30 pm: Grand Prismatic Spring. Take in the breathtaking view from the Grand Prismatic Spring Overlook. It’s a 1.6-mile round trip walk from the Fairy Falls parking lot. Then, brave the crowds at Midway Geyser Basin for an up-close view of the Grand Prismatic Spring.

Grand Prismatic Spring Yellowstone Itinerary

The view from Grand Prismatic Spring Overlook

Midway Geyser Basin

Midway Geyser Basin | Yellowstone Itinerary

4:00 pm: Hayden Valley. Hayden Valley is one of the best places in Yellowstone to see bison. If you are lucky, there will be a large herd on the roadside so you can get up close with these animals.

Yellowstone Itinerary Summer

Bison in Hayden Valley | Yellowstone Itinerary

5:30 pm: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. You can visit both rims of the canyon, either driving or hiking to the overlooks. If you are doing good on time, it is worth it to see both sides of the canyon. But if you are short on time (or low on energy), go to the south rim and visit Artist Point, the iconic view of the waterfall and one of the most popular sites in Yellowstone.

Artist Point Yellowstone Itinerary

Artist Point, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone | Yellowstone Itinerary

Once finished at Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, check into your hotel. Canyon Village is the most convenient place to stay. If you have plans to drive on to Glacier National Park, stay in West Yellowstone. Currently, you cannot exit the park from the north entrance so I do not recommend staying in Gardiner, Montana.

Doing this in Reverse Order: You can also do this in reverse order, starting in West Yellowstone, Mammoth, or Gardiner, and ending in Grand Teton. Go first to the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, drive through Hayden Valley, visit Grand Prismatic Spring when the sun is still high in the sky (to see the most vibrant colors) and end with Old Faithful.

For more information, read our article about How to Spend One Day in Yellowstone.

Visiting Yellowstone on a Day Trip from Grand Teton National Park or Jackson

Visiting Yellowstone on a day trip from Grand Teton National Park or Jackson works great. With one day, you can visit the tops sights in Yellowstone, including Old Faithful, Grand Prismatic Spring, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, and see the bison in Hayden Valley.

We have a detailed guide on how to plan your day trip from Grand Teton and Jackson. But if you prefer to learn more about Yellowstone from a guide and/or if you don’t want the hassle of driving and parking, there are several highly rated tours that start in Jackson.

Two Day Yellowstone Itinerary

This two-day Yellowstone itinerary is a continuation of the itinerary above, only you travel at a more leisurely pace and you get to visit a few more places.

How to Use This Map: Click the tab in the top left hand corner of the map to view the layers (places to go and the driving route). You can click the check marks to hide or show layers. If you click the icons on the map, you can get more information about each point of interest.

If you click the star next to the title of the map, this map will be added to your Google Maps account. To view it on your phone or computer, open Google Maps, click the menu button, go to “Your Places,” click Maps, and you will see this map on your list.

Day One

Morning: Old Faithful and the Upper Geyser Basin. Watch the geyser eruption from the boardwalk. For a unique view of the eruption (and much lower crowds), hike up to Observation Point. Take your time walking through the Upper Geyser Basin and Geyser Hill. Have lunch at the Old Faithful Inn or assemble a picnic lunch at the Old Faithful General Store.

Midday: Grand Prismatic Spring and Midway Geyser Basin. Consider adding on the hike to Fairy Falls.

Afternoon: More Geyser Basins. Located in the same area as Grand Prismatic Spring and Old Faithful are several more geyser basins to visit: Biscuit Basin, the Fountain Paint Pot Trail, and Black Sand Basin. Leave the crowds behind and hike to Lone Star Geyser, a geyser that erupts up to 45 feet every 3 hours.

Where to Stay: Old Faithful, Canyon Village or West Yellowstone

Observation Point Yellowstone Itinerary

View of Old Faithful from Observation Point | Yellowstone Itinerary

Yellowstone Hot Spring

Fountain Paint Pot Trail | Yellowstone Itinerary

Old Faithful Inn

Old Faithful Inn | Yellowstone Itinerary

Day Two

If you stayed in Old Faithful the night before:

Morning: Visit West Thumb Geyser Basin and drive through Hayden Valley to see the herds of bison. Optional: visit Mud Volcano, a short trail that takes you past bubbling mud pots.

Morning/Midday: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. Visit both sides of the rim, either walking or driving to the overlooks. Midday, parking can be limited, so your best bet is to walk to the overlooks. Our top experiences here include Artist Point and Uncle Tom’s Trail on the South Rim and Brink of the Lower Falls, Lookout Point, and Red Rock Point on the North Rim. Learn more about the Grand Canyon and ideas on how to plan your time in our Guide to Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.

Afternoon: Visit Norris Geyser Basin. A visit here consists of seeing two basins, Back Basin and Porcelain Basin. Unless you catch Steamboat Geyser in action, Porcelain Basin is more thrilling. Steaming hot springs, light blue thermal pools, and noisy fumaroles are what you will see here.

Late Afternoon/Evening: Mammoth Hot Springs. Mammoth Hot Springs is a large complex of hot springs that is located in north Yellowstone. Hot, steaming water spills out over travertine terraces, making this one of the most unique geothermal areas in the park. A visit here can be quick, with a short walk to one or two viewpoints. Or, you can spend an hour or two walking the boardwalk trails past each of the viewpoints.

West Thumb

West Thumb Geyser Basin | Yellowstone Itinerary

Norris Geyser Basin

Norris Geyser Basin | Yellowstone Itinerary

Mammoth Hot Springs Yellowstone Itinerary

Mammoth Hot Spring | Yellowstone Itinerary

If you stayed in West Yellowstone or Canyon Village:

Morning: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone
Midday: Hayden Valley with the option to visit Mud Volcano
Afternoon: Norris Geyser Basin and Mammoth Hot Springs.

Where to Stay: West Yellowstone or Canyon Village

Yellowstone National Park Guide

Three Day Yellowstone Itinerary

Our three-day itinerary is similar to our two-day itinerary, with the addition of the amazing Lamar Valley, a scenic drive, and the addition of a big hike. Note: due to the recent floods, Lamar Valley might be inaccessible in 2022.

Day One

Morning: Old Faithful and Upper Geyser Basin
Midday: Grand Prismatic Spring, Midway Geyser Basin, and the option to hike to Fairy Falls
Afternoon: Geyser basins near Old Faithful and Grand Prismatic Spring: Black Sand Basin, Biscuit Basin and the Fountain Paint Pot Trail

Where to Stay: Canyon Village, Old Faithful, or West Yellowstone

Day Two

Morning: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone
Midday: Drive Dunraven Pass. This is a good time to hike to the top of Mt. Washburn for panoramic views of the park. It is a 6.2 mile round trip hike.
Afternoon: Drive through Hayden Valley to spot wildlife. Optional visit to Mud Volcano. Optional visit to West Thumb Geyser Basin.

Where to Stay: Canyon Village is the best place to stay but West Yellowstone and Mammoth/Gardiner also work well.

Day Three

Morning: Norris Geyser Basin
Midday: Mammoth Hot Springs. Have lunch in Mammoth or Gardiner. See the Roosevelt Arch, a stone arch that was constructed in 1903 and marks the main entrance into the park at that time. Consider taking a swim at Boiling River Hot Spring, a naturally occurring hot spring that is located near Roosevelt Arch and Mammoth.
Evening: Visit Lamar Valley at dusk. This is the best place in Yellowstone to spot wildlife.

Important Note: Boiling River Hot Spring, Roosevelt Arch, and Lamar Valley might be inaccessible in 2022.

Where to Stay: Mammoth, Gardiner, or Canyon Village

Boiling River

Boiling River Hot Spring | Yellowstone Itinerary

Lamar Valley Sunset

Lamar Valley at Sunset | Yellowstone Itinerary

Gardiner Yellowstone Itinerary

Gardiner, Montana | Yellowstone Itinerary

PRO TRAVEL TIP: When driving through Yellowstone, be prepared to drive slowly and to get stuck in “animal traffic jams.” Bison tend to stop smack in the middle of the road, blocking traffic in both directions, creating traffic jams.

Read Post  Where to Stay in Puerto Rico in 2022, by an Area Local

Yellowstone Bison

Four Day Yellowstone Itinerary

With four days, you can visit the main highlights of Yellowstone at a leisurely pace. You also have the option to add in a few short hikes.

Tip to Avoid the Crowds: Crowds are largest between 10 am and 4 pm in the summer months. If you have four or five days in Yellowstone, you have more time to work with, so it is possible to plan your days to avoid sightseeing at these crowded times. Start early, visit a site in the morning, relax in your lodge or have a leisurely picnic lunch midday, and then visit another site in the late afternoon.

On our most recent visit to Yellowstone, we were here in August. To avoid the crowds, we woke up very early and toured the park from 7 am to 11 am. We spent the middle part of the day at our hotel and then we went back out at 5 pm. It worked out very well. We saw most places with low crowds and we had a better chance to spot wildlife, since the animals are most active at dawn and dusk. The only downside is the extra driving.

Day One

Morning: Old Faithful and Upper Geyser Basin
Midday: Grand Prismatic Spring, Midway Geyser Basin, and the option to hike to Fairy Falls
Afternoon: Geyser basins near Old Faithful and Grand Prismatic Spring: Black Sand Basin, Biscuit Basin and the Fountain Paint Pot Trail

PRO TRAVEL TIP: The best time to visit Grand Prismatic Spring is midday, when the sun is high in the sky and the morning mist has burned off of the spring. This is one place in Yellowstone that we recommend visiting midday, during peak hours.

Where to Stay: Canyon Village, Old Faithful, or West Yellowstone

Morning Glory Pool in the Upper Geyser Basin near Old Faithful

Day Two

Morning: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone
Midday: Have lunch in Canyon Village. Drive Dunraven Pass. This is a good time to hike to the top of Mt. Washburn for panoramic views of the park. It is a 6.2 mile round trip hike. Or, drive south to Yellowstone Lake and hike Elephant Back Mountain, a 3.5-mile trail that offers nice views over Yellowstone Lake.
Afternoon: Drive through Hayden Valley to spot wildlife. Optional visit to Mud Volcano and/or West Thumb Geyser Basin.

Where to Stay: Canyon Village is the best place to stay but West Yellowstone and Mammoth/Gardiner also work well.

Day Three

Morning: Norris Geyser Basin
Midday: Free time at your hotel
Afternoon: Mammoth Hot Springs

Where to Stay: Mammoth

Day Four

Morning: Optional hike near Mammoth. The Bunsen Peak Trail is a 4.6-mile hike where you climb to a peak for great views of north Yellowstone. The Beaver Ponds Loop Trail is an easy 5-mile hike with a good chance to spot wildlife, just make sure you bring bear spray.
Midday: Relax in your hotel or have a picnic lunch.
Afternoon/Evening: Drive to Lamar Valley. On the way, add on the 7-mile scenic drive on the Blacktail Plateau. End the day spotting wildlife in Lamar Valley. Note: Lamar Valley might be inaccessible in 2022.

Where to Stay: Mammoth

Blacktail Plateau Yellowstone Itinerary

Blacktail Plateau | Yellowstone Itinerary

Lamar Valley Yellowstone Itinerary

Lamar Valley | Yellowstone Itinerary

Another option to consider is this 4 day tour of Grand Teton and Yellowstone. With a guide, you visit both Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks. Along the way, you will stay in Jackson, Cody, and Cooke City. The fee includes transportation, lodging, and your guide. The tour is designed as a safari, giving you the best chance to spot wildlife.

Five Day Yellowstone Itinerary

With five days in Yellowstone, I recommend following the four day itinerary and on your fifth day, adding on additional experiences in Yellowstone.

Ideas include:

  • Take a Ranger Guided Tour
  • Go Fishing
  • Spend more time in Lamar Valley spotting wildlife
  • Go horseback riding
  • Go hiking (there are over 1,000 miles of trails in Yellowstone)
  • Plan a backcountry camping trip
  • Drive Beartooth Highway. This scenic drive is one of the best in the USA and starts at the northeast entrance of Yellowstone. Read our Guide to Beartooth Highway for more information. Note: Beartooth Highway might be inaccessible in 2022.

Beartooth Highway

Beartooth Highway | Yellowstone Itinerary

For a full list of things to do in Yellowstone, visit the National Park Service website.

US National Parks List

Planning Your Trip

Reserving Your Hotels/Lodges

If you want to stay within Yellowstone National Park, in one of the lodges or campgrounds, you need to make your reservation well in advance.

Reservations open May 1 the prior year for summer (Summer 2023 reservations open May 1, 2022) and March 15 the prior year for winter. Lodges get fully booked one year in advance but cancellations are common, so keep checking back if you can’t reserve the lodge you want.

Get recommendations on where to stay in and around Yellowstone in our post Best Hotels and Locations in Yellowstone.

National Park Fee

It costs $35 per vehicle to enter the park and this is good for seven days.

America the Beautiful Pass: If you have plans to visit Grand Teton, Yellowstone, and Glacier National Parks, it is worth it to purchase the America the Beautiful Pass. This annual park pass costs $80 and is valid for one year. Not only will you save money on park fees for this trip but you will also get free admission to any other national park or federal recreation sites that you visit within 365 days of purchasing this pass.

Traveling with an RV

We have not traveled with an RV, so we don’t have experience about what it is like to visit Yellowstone with an RV (but we have seen many RV’s on these roads). If you want more information, I recommend taking a look at this website, for an overview of what to expect in the park.

Important Links

Check park conditions and road closures on the official Yellowstone National Park website.

Tours of Yellowstone

If you prefer to visit Yellowstone with an experienced guide, or want to avoid the hassle of driving and parking, here are several highly rated tours to consider.

Yellowstone Entrance Gate

Frequently Asked Questions

How many days do you need in Yellowstone National Park?

If you want to see Yellowstone’s top sights, plan on spending three full days in the park. This gives you enough time to drive the south and north loops, visit the long list of geyser basins and hot springs, hike a few trails, and spot wildlife in the park.

Is one day enough time to visit Yellowstone?

With one day in Yellowstone, you can see a few highlights of the park, so it is still a worthwhile experience. This can be done on a point-to-point road trip through the park or as a day trip from Grand Teton National Park.

Where is the best place to stay in Yellowstone?

The best place to stay in Yellowstone depends on your travel itinerary. Yellowstone is a very large national park, with 5 park entrances, multiple villages inside the park, and small towns that sit outside of the park boundary. If you have plans to spend several days in Yellowstone, we recommend that you stay in two different areas, in order to minimize how much driving you will do.

Where Are You Going Next?

If your visit to Yellowstone is part of a bigger road trip through Montana and Wyoming, here are some articles to help you plan your trip.

Yellowstone National Park

Grand Teton National Park

Glacier National Park

If you have any questions about this Yellowstone itinerary, let us know in the comment section below.

Read all of our articles about the United States in our United States Travel Guide.

Yellowstone Itinerary and Travel Guide

Yellowstone National Park Itinerary

All rights reserved © Earth Trekkers. Republishing this article and/or any of its contents (text, photography, etc.), in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited.

A beginner’s guide to visiting Yellowstone National Park: Everything you should see and do

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I recently returned from an incredible trip to Yellowstone, our nation’s first national park. It was very strange to be there in the days of COVID-19, but it was also one of my best visits yet, as it wasn’t as crowded as it’s been in the past. It was also my first time actually staying inside the park, which was quite a treat.

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Of course, you could easily spend weeks exploring the sprawling 2.2 million acre park and still not see it all. But even a day trip here or long weekend getaway is well worth your time. Here’s everything you need to know to plan your trip to Yellowstone National Park.

What to see and do in Yellowstone

Let me start with the highlight: the wildlife.

Among the many rare species you might encounter are grizzly and brown bears, wolves, mountain lions, foxes, coyotes, elk, deer, buffalo, moose and every matter of birds. You can easily pull off the road and see any or all of these animals at once. Buffalo, in particular, are known to cause traffic jams as they use the same roads you do to commute.

Travelers will also discover a ton of adventure in this park. You can camp, hike in the backcountry, boat, fish, cycle and, in the winter, you can even try cross-country skiing.

Both biking and hiking are great ways to experience the natural wonder of this incredible park, and there are plenty of mountain biking and off-roading opportunities. Campsites are available from just $5 a night, and there are approximately 900 miles of trails to explore in the park — just be hyper-aware of your surroundings, as you’ll be sharing the territory with some fearsome predators. When I was there last, I saw both bears and wolves.

There are so many amazing hikes here that aren’t too difficult and are within walking distance of accessible parking areas. My favorite was probably the hike to Mystic Falls from Biscuit Basin, not too far from Old Faithful. The 2.5-mile round-trip walk takes you to a dramatic waterfall. If you hike a little farther you might luck out like I did and see Old Faithful erupt on the horizon.

Old Faithful

Probably the most famous of all Yellowstone’s attractions, Old Faithful is a massive geyser that erupts reliably every 60 to 110 minutes. It’s a cone geyser in the Upper Geyser Basin and easily accessible by road, and park rangers can tell you when the next eruption is during the day. There are benches from which you can watch the spectacle. It erupts about 20 times per day, and the plume of water and steam can be as high as 180 feet!

You can usually stay at a lodge near Old Faithful, but for the 2020 season, only cabins are available.

Grand Canyon of Yellowstone

This river valley formed by the Yellowstone River is probably my favorite part of Yellowstone. I’ve been here now in several different seasons and it’s always changing, always distinctly different and always awe-inspiring.

There are several viewpoints, and it’s one of the most dramatic areas in the country. I’m especially fond of Artist Point. As you can imagine, they call it that for a reason.

You can also check out the Canyon’s Lower or Upper Falls viewing areas. I highly recommend doing the Brink of the Lower Falls observation point where you can really get a sense of the river’s immense power. If you’re driving, be prepared to pull over constantly to get a new perspective.

Mammoth Hot Springs

Mammoth Hot Springs was one of the first parts of the park that saw policing back in the 1800s when poaching was a problem. The U.S. Army had a base there (it still houses park employees) and it’s home to historic Fort Yellowstone.

Travelers will also find the Mammoth Hot Springs lodges and cabins, places to eat and even a gas station.

But the best features are the dramatic hot springs laced with boardwalks for closer observations. You can get a good look at the many steaming hydrothermal pools and the travertine terraces. You can walk (or drive) to the Upper Terraces. There’s also a hiking trail circling the pools and falls, but bring your bear spray. In a 24-hour span, I saw a grizzly bear and her cubs, and the next morning I saw another grizzly near the road.

There are also herds of elk that call the area home. You’re pretty much guaranteed to see elk during a trip here.

Biscuit Basin and Mystic Falls

Not far from Old Faithful you’ll find Biscuit Basin, which is home to gorgeous hot springs and small geysers with fairly regular eruptions.

The mix of colors and textures in the rocks is striking. You can follow a wooden walkway and it will eventually lead to an easy hike to Mystic Falls and a spectacular waterfall in a river valley.

There are also plenty of fun family-friendly activities just outside the park in cities such as Gardiner and West Yellowstone, Montana. Consider, for example, the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone. You and the kids can see live bears and wolves who can’t return to the wild and learn a ton about the fearsome animals from a safe distance.

Whether you’re exploring the park by foot or car, don’t forget to grab an $80 annual national park pass. Yellowstone National Park normally charges a $35 entrance fee per vehicle, so if you have any other national park trips on the horizon, you can easily get your money’s worth.

The best times to visit Yellowstone

The peak time is definitely summer when everything is open. It can get hot, but it’s generally not humid. You should pack shorts for the daytime, and be sure to bring sweaters, a sweatshirt or a coat. Yellowstone is in the mountains and it gets cold at night even in the summertime.

You can travel here all year long, including during the winter, which would be a magical (albeit cold) time to visit Yellowstone. Warren Smith, a chiropractor at HealthSource in Butte, Montana, told me he has cross-country skied into the park from West Yellowstone, and outfitters will take even take you snowmobiling.

My personal favorite time to visit is in the early fall when the crowds are thinner, and the colors begin to change. Temperatures are more moderate and it’s not quite so hot. You get more of the park to yourself and wildlife is more likely to be around. Keep in mind, though, there can be freak snowstorms even in September — so pack for anything.

Where to stay in Yellowstone

There are plenty of places for you to stay in and around Yellowstone. Both vacation rental properties and hotels are plentiful at all five entrances to Yellowstone (there are three in Montana and two in Wyoming).

Points hotels near Yellowstone

Search Cook City, Gardiner, Red Lodge or West Yellowstone in Montana for hotels or rental properties near the trio of Montana entrances. There are also plenty of places to bed down at the two Wyoming entrances. You can search Cody, Wyoming and areas in Idaho.

If you’re looking for places to spend points, however, there are far fewer options unless you’re willing to stay a few hours outside the park in places like Bozeman, Montana or Idaho Falls, Idaho.

There’s a nice Holiday Inn in West Yellowstone where last-minute rooms in July started at $281 a night. That’s steep, but if you book early you can certainly find better rates. A long weekend in September will set you back $252 a night, or you can use 45,000 IHG Rewards Points per night.

I booked a room here in July and, despite the last-minute reservation, managed to secure a decent rate. Just watch out for added taxes and fees (unlike the rest of Montana, there are taxes in West Yellowstone). The final price ended up being almost $300 a night. Ouch.

There are also two Choice hotel properties travelers may want to consider: An Ascend Hotel for $212 a night and a Comfort Inn starting at $186 a night in West Yellowstone. Choice also has select properties in Livingstone, Montana, but that’s an hour away from the park.

Travelers can also consider the Days Inn by Wyndham West Yellowstone (from 15,000 Wyndham points per night). And if you have Best Western Rewards points, you could try the Best Western Desert Inn or the Best Western Weston Inn, both from 28,000 points per night.

If you’re looking for a major chain hotel, you’ll need to head to Bozeman, Montana for a Hilton or a Marriott property. Rates are generally better, but it’s a good 2-hour drive to Yellowstone. Prices are also high during the peak summer season — yes, even in 2020 — and can easily run at least $250 per night.

When it welcomes its first guests on Aug. 18, the 122-room Kimpton Armory Hotel Bozeman will be one of the area’s most exciting new properties. The art deco building dating back to 1941 and features a whiskey bar, a rooftop pool and a concert hall. It’s about an hour from Big Sky and two hours to the north entrance to Yellowstone.

In Big Sky, the relatively new Wilson Hotel, a Residence Inn by Marriott, is one of the first from a major brand in the area.

Staying inside Yellowstone’s borders

Within the park, travelers will discover several rustic lodges. Xanterra is the concessioner for all accommodations inside Yellowstone National Park (as well as Glacier and others, too). Many of the large lodges have existed for more than a century, so keep that in mind and manage your expectations accordingly.

Hotels sell out quickly during the high season. Even this summer, with the coronavirus crippling travel, there isn’t much availability. In fact, only cabins are available in the park right now. Lodges are closed and are likely to remain shut down for the remainder of 2020. That makes inventory even scarcer than it usually is this time of year.

I was able to find some dates with availability, but prices are high. At Mammoth Falls Lodge cabins, rates were $277 a night for dates in July and August.

Back in June, I stayed in the cabins at Mammoth Hot Springs Lodge. They are charming but basic. The beds are small, and there’s no air conditioning. Still, it was really fun staying inside the park and having easy access to hiking trails and the beautiful Mammoth Springs.

The cabins at Old Faithful Lodge are cuter and just steps from the famous Old Faithful geyser. They’re tiny, sure, but the perfect base for exploring the nearby geysers, mountains and hot springs when I stayed there in June. Rates in August start at $174 a night.

If you’re thinking about staying inside the park this summer, you want to act fast.

Betsy O’Rourke, chief marketing officer at Xanterra, told TPG earlier this year, “We open the inventory 13 months out and we sell out in a few hours. However, about 30% of that inventory cancels and gets rebooked.”

Her advice? Check back frequently. “Our cancellation policy is 48 hours out, so we do get cancellations even close in.”

You can find better deals if you’re willing to stay at a vacation rental instead. Airbnb has plenty of properties, especially for travelers who want something unconventional like a traditional log cabin, glamping-style tent or a treehouse.

Even last minute, there’s availability on Airbnb outside the park. I recommend searching for West Yellowstone or Gardiner. I found plenty of options near Montana’s Western entrance to the park starting at $157 a night.

Luxury accommodations near Yellowstone

It can also make a lot of sense to use your credit card points to help offset the cost of an upscale stay near the park. Consider redeeming a stash of Chase Ultimate Rewards points to book a stay at an independent property. You could also “erase” a qualifying travel charge by using a card like the Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card.

The Under Canvas “glamping” lodge is just 10 minutes from Yellowstone’s West Entrance. I found availability in August for $264 a night. With taxes and fees, a four-night stay would be just over $1,200.

If you really want to splurge, try the Triple Creek Ranch in Darby, Montana — it’s about 4.5 hours from the park, and rates start around $1,600 a night. Paws Up resort in Greenough, Montana is also a 4.5-hour drive, and rooms will set you back about $1,700 a night. And the first five-star, ultra-luxury hotel in the entire state, a Montage in Big Sky, will debut in 2021.

Camping in Yellowstone

Of course, you can always camp inside Yellowstone. Yellowstone has 12 proper campgrounds with over 2,000 individual spots. You can head over to Yellowstone National Park lodges to make reservations, which cost $27 a night, on average.

Other campgrounds are available on a first come, first served basis. They fill up quickly in the summer, and in 2020 not all campgrounds are available because of the pandemic, so your mileage may vary. A search in July found just four of the 12 campgrounds open and accepting reservations. In fact, most were full by 7 a.m.

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If you have an RV or camping equipment, you can stay outside the park in the surrounding national forests for very little — or nothing at all. It’s called dispersed camping, and travelers comfortable with a more primitive stay should consider the surrounding Custer Gallatin or Bridger Teton National Forests.

How to get to Yellowstone

Flying to Yellowstone

You can fly to a number of cities that put Yellowstone within reach. The easiest and closest airport is Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport (BZN) in Montana, which bills itself as the “Gateway to Yellowstone.” It’s the busiest airport in Montana with nonstop service to 21 U.S. cities.

American Airlines has been betting big on Montana and added four seasonal flights last year for this summer. American was set to fly to Bozeman from Los Angeles (LAX), New York-LaGuardia (LGA) and Philadelphia (PHL) and to Kalispell (FCA) from LGA. None of those flights are happening, but we’re hoping they return next year.

American normally flies from Newark (EWR), Chicago O’Hare (ORD) and Dallas Fort-Worth (DFW) nonstop to Bozeman. I found tickets in September for between $377 and $425 in the main cabin. Award prices started at 25,000 AAdvantage miles in coach or 50,000 miles for first class, plus $11.20 in taxes and fees.

United flies to Bozeman from six of its hubs, and Delta Air Lines also flies from six hubs, including Salt Lake City (SLC). At this time, Delta is only flying from Minneapolis-Saint Paul (MSP) and Salt Lake City (SLC). Alaska Airlines has flights from Portland, Oregon (PDX) and Seattle (SEA), and Allegiant flies from four cities including Nashville, Tennessee (BNA). Frontier flies from Denver (DEN), and Sun Country now flies from its Minneapolis hub. JetBlue normally flies from New York-JFK and Boston (BOS) but this summer, they’re not flying from New York.

Give yourself two hours for the drive from Bozeman to Yellowstone depending on traffic, weather and which park entrance you’re using. There are a variety of operators that offer guided tours of Yellowstone. Karst Stage is one touring company that operates charter buses and day trips from Bozeman to the park.

You can also fly into Jackson Hole Airport (JAC) in Jackson, Wyoming. The airport is only 45 miles south of the park. It also gives you easy access to Grand Teton National Park. American Airlines, Alaska Airlines, Delta Air Lines, and United Airlines all fly to Jackson Hole airport, and Frontier offers seasonal service.

Delta has flights from Salt Lake City for about $300 in the main cabin in August or 23,000 SkyMiles plus $11.20.

You could also fly to Idaho Falls, Idaho and its Idaho Falls Regional Airport (IDA). It’s just under 100 miles from Yellowstone. Allegiant offers year-round, nonstop flights from Las Vegas (LAS) and Phoenix-Mesa (AZA), and seasonal service from Los Angeles and Oakland (OAK).

Delta offers year-round, nonstop flights from Salt Lake City and seasonal service from Minneapolis, and United has service from Denver. United’s flights to IDA were about $347 round-trip in main cabin or 25,000 United miles and $11.20 in taxes and fees.

Of course, there’s always Yellowstone’s eponymous airport. Yellowstone Airport (WYS) is located just 2 miles from Yellowstone National Park. Delta flies into this airport from Salt Lake City, and I found tickets from $175 in August.

Where to eat in Yellowstone

Montana and Wyoming aren’t exactly known as foodie paradise. There are plenty of cafes and restaurants, but haute cuisine isn’t exactly a thing.

Personally, I recommend doing grocery runs and always keeping a picnic ready for those mountain meadows you stumble upon. Be sure to pack lots of snacks, as restaurants are typically only open in the high season and often have limited hours.

They are also few and far between, especially inside the borders of the park, and they’re especially scarce in the age of coronavirus. In fact, most restaurants inside the park remain closed, and the few that are open are take-out only. Forewarned is forearmed.

Terrace Grill in Yellowstone National Park is take-out only in the summer of 2020. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Smith, the chiropractor from Butte, told me he really likes two places in West Yellowstone: the Slippery Otter Pub that serves bison and elk burgers, and The Branch Restaurant and Bar. Unfortunately, it was closed when I visited in early July (probably due to COVID-19). Hopefully, it will reopen next year.

One of the most important things to know about visiting the national parks right now is that most of the bathrooms I encountered in both Yellowstone and Glacier were closed due to the coronavirus outbreak. If you go, definitely have a plan for the call of nature. Folks driving motorhomes will be fine, but be sure to plot your visit and use bathrooms wherever you find them.

Getting around Yellowstone

I strongly recommend renting a car (or an RV!) for your trip to Yellowstone National Park. The park is really designed for drivers, with major roads taking you to most of the iconic attractions. Still, if you really want to explore, bring hiking boots. And don’t forget to pack your bear spray. You can’t fly with it, though, so buy bear spray after your flight.

If you’d rather not drive, seasoned park veterans take visitors on the famous Yellowstone Yellow Bus Tours. The vintage 1920s buses are an iconic part of the park’s heritage. The long, yellow buses with rollback tops are perfect for gazing at the mountains without worrying about the notorious curves in the park’s roads.

“These days, a fleet of eight vintage White Motor Co. buses ferry visitors on guided wildlife-watching tours, photo safaris, sunset tours and more,” says operator Xanterra. “The distinctive antique yellow vehicles have retractable canvas roofs and panoramic windows, making them ideal for sightseeing. Plus, they’re really cool to ride around in.”

They also book up quickly, so you’ll want to be aggressive with your planning. But, unfortunately, Yellow Bus tours are not running during the 2020 season due to coronavirus concerns.

You could also bike around the park, but there’s not a lot of separated bike lanes. There are, however, a few trails specially designed for mountain biking. There’s a complete guide to biking in Yellowstone here, but you can also rent bikes at Old Faithful Lodge.

Bottom line

Yellowstone National Park should be very high on your travel bucket list. It’s a great time to go local and explore the nation’s many national parks. Yellowstone is a personal favorite, and getting to see wolves and bears here was one of the highlights of my entire year.

If you’re traveling to Montana, don’t limit yourself to Yellowstone National Park, though. Across the state, there’s Glacier National Park and countless sites that tell the incredibly important history of Native Americans in the United States. Big Sky, not far from Yellowstone, is also surging in popularity. It’s a great spot for skiing in the winter.

I highly recommend a visit here this year, especially since travelers with a U.S. passport might find they can’t venture too far from home. Just be sure to pack your masks and have a firm plan for where to stay — and use the bathroom — before you go.

Additional reporting by Meghan Hunter.

All photos by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy.

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Editorial disclaimer: Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airline or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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Yellowstone Itinerary: How to Spend 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 Days in Yellowstone

Multi-colored rainbow hot springs - Grand Prismatic in Yellowstone

If you’re planning a trip to Yellowstone National Park, you may be feeling overwhelmed. As America’s first national park (and one of the biggest!), there’s a never-ending list of things to do in Yellowstone National Park.

Well, this post on the best Yellowstone itinerary is here to help!

Whether you have one day in Yellowstone or plan to spend a week there, you’ll find plenty of inspiration in this guide.

I’m sharing the best 1-day, 2-day, 3-day, 4-day, and 5-day itineraries for Yellowstone National Park, plus:

  • The ideal number of days to spend in Yellowstone
  • Best time to visit Yellowstone
  • How to get to Yellowstone
  • Where to stay inside and near the park
  • Exclusive travel and packing tips for your trip to Yellowstone

Are you ready to plan an epic Yellowstone National Park vacation, no matter how much time you have to spend? Let’s get started!

Important Note
Due to the severe flooding in Yellowstone National Park in June 2022, some roads remain closed. However, as of July 2, 93% of the roads in the park are open and the temporary “Alternating License Plate System” is no longer in effect.

To learn more about what’s open in Yellowstone, read the flood recovery page on the Yellowstone website.

Are you looking for more ideas to plan your trip to Yellowstone National Park? Don’t miss this guide!

This post may contain affiliate links, where I may receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. Read more in this disclosure policy.

Yellowstone National Park At-A-Glance

Before diving in, here are a few highlights to help you plan your trip:

  • Best Time to Visit: Summer is a great time to visit thanks to warm weather and all park amenities being open, but it is also the most crowded time of year. Avoid crowds by visiting in September or early October.
  • Where to Stay: Yellowstone has eight lodges inside the park, plus several campgrounds. The Old Faithful Inn and Canyon Lodge are my favorites, both close to all the most popular places to see in the park. Outside the park, look for hotels in West Yellowstone, Montana.
  • How to Get There: The closest airport is in West Yellowstone (WYS), serviced by both United and Delta Airlines. Other major airports in the region include Jackson Hole (JAC), Bozeman (BZN), and Salt Lake (SLC). Use Skyscanner to browse flights and find the best price.
  • How to Get Around: The easiest way to get around Yellowstone is by car. Use Rentalcars.com to browse deals on rental cars or rent an RV or campervan with Outdoorsy .
  • Best Self-Guided Tour: My favorite way to learn more about the park is with GyPSy Guides, a narrated self-guided tour perfect for road trips and scenic drives. The Yellowstone Guide and the Yellowstone/Grand Teton Bundle both provide incredible commentary and detail about the history and geology of Yellowstone.
  • Don’t Forget: Be sure to get an America the Beautiful National Park Pass ahead of time. This $80 pass is valid for 12 months and get you into all 400+ national park sites (including both Yellowstone and Grand Teton!).

Overview of the Regions in This Yellowstone Trip Itinerary

Yellowstone National Park is located in the northwestern corner of Wyoming, with small portions of the park crossing over into neighboring Idaho and Montana.

Covering over 2 million acres, Yellowstone is one of the largest national parks in the United States. There’s no shortage of incredible things to do in Yellowstone, from geothermal features to waterfalls galore.

The park’s massive lands are connected through the Grand Loop Road. This famous scenic highway forms a “Figure 8”, as you can see in the map below. Grand Loop Road is the primary route for most activities in Yellowstone.

Road turns around a rock face overlooking a forest in Yellowstone

The Grand Loop Road also connects the park’s five entrances. The best way to enter the park will depend on where you’re traveling from and what you plan to do within the park.

  • West Entrance in West Yellowstone, Montana – best all around as it’s only minutes outside West Yellowstone, Montana.
  • North Entrance in Gardiner, Montana – best for visiting Mammoth Hot Springs and flying in from Bozeman(also the only entrance open year-round)
  • Northeast Entrance in Cooke City, Montana – best for visiting Lamar Valley and driving the Beartooth Highway and flying into Billings
  • East Entrance near Wapiti, Wyoming – best for visiting Yellowstone Lake and flying into Cody
  • South Entrance near Moran, Wyoming – best for those also visiting Grand Teton National Park or flying into Jackson Hole

The most famous region is the section of Grand Loop Road between Madison and West Thumb. This region is home to the famous Old Faithful Geyser, the Upper Geyser Basin, and Grand Prismatic Spring.

Another must-visit area of Yellowstone is Canyon Village. This region is home to the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone and Hayden Valley.

If you’re short on time, I recommend prioritizing the southern loop of Grand Loop Road.

If you have more than two days in Yellowstone, the northern loop of Grand Loop Road is also worth a visit, including Mammoth Hot Springs and Lamar Valley.

Hot springs scattered across West Thumb Geyser Basin in Yellowstone

How Many Days Do You Need in Yellowstone National Park?

You should plan to spend at least 2 to 3 days in Yellowstone National Park. Two days gives you enough time to see the most popular destinations. Adding a third day gives you time to explore some less visited and off-the-beaten-path attractions.

That said, this guide covers itineraries ranging from 1 to 5 days to give you the most flexibility. With five full days, you’ll be able to explore Yellowstone in its entirety.

Best Time to Visit Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park is a top-rated summer destination (and for a good reason!). Summer is by far the best time to visit Yellowstone. The weather is comfortable, and all park amenities, roads, and trails are open.

Winters in Yellowstone are long and harsh. Snowfall is expected to start in late October and continue through late April or early May. As a result, most park roads and visitor centers close by November.

Since the tourism season is relatively short, you’ll likely encounter heavy crowds when visiting in summer. Therefore, I recommend visiting in May or from September to mid-October to avoid crowds.

Yellowstone River flows through a valley in the fall

Here’s a quick overview of what to expect during each season in Yellowstone National Park:

  • Spring: Temperatures remain cold for much of the Spring, with daytime highs in the 40s and overnight temperatures in the teens. In the Spring, crowds are low, with less than 1,500 people visiting per day. Spring is an excellent time to visit to see grizzly and black bears, but many park amenities and roads are still closed.
  • Summer: By early summer, temperatures become more comfortable, staying in the 70s during the day, but dropping to the 30s overnight. Yellowstone’s busiest time of year is summer, with more than 30,000 visitors. Avoid summer crowds by visiting top attractions on weekdays or around sunrise or sunset.
  • Fall: Both temperatures and crowds begin to decline after Labor Day in September. Daytime temperatures remain in the 50s and 60s through October. Visiting in the fall is excellent for spotting bears and elks. Many park facilities and roads will begin to close for the winter.
  • Winter: The winter months in Yellowstone are incredibly harsh, with temperatures rarely reaching above freezing and heavy snow blanketing the park. Much of the park is closed in winter, except a few areas like Old Faithful (accessible by snowmobile only) and Mammoth Hot Springs. If you can brave the harsh conditions, you’re rewarded with solitude and excellent opportunities for spotting wolves.

How Far Is It to Yellowstone National Park?

Yellowstone National Park is a reasonably remote destination, located several hours from major cities.

Due to its location, many visitors combine the trip with other national parks like Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming and Glacier National Park in Montana.

The best way to get to Yellowstone is by flying unless you live within driving distance.

The closest airports to Yellowstone National Park are:

  • Yellowstone Airport (WYS) – 5 minutes to West Entrance
  • Jackson Hole Airport (JAC) – 1 hour to South Entrance
  • Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport (BZN) – 1.5 hours to North Entrance
  • Cody / Yellowstone Regional Airport (COD) – 1.5 hours to East Entrance
  • Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC) – 5 hours to West Entrance

I use Skyscanner to find the best flight prices and compare routes. Once you find your flight, Skyscanner redirects you to book with the airline directly, so you don’t miss out on frequent flyer points! Search flights on Skyscanner now.

If you need a rental car, I recommend using Rentalcars.com to find the best deals. It allows you to search across major retailers like Avis, Hertz, Enterprise, Budget, and more. Search rental car prices with Rentalcars.com now.

If you choose to drive to Yellowstone National Park, these are some rough distances from major cities or nearby towns:

  • Jackson, WY – 1 hour to the South Entrance
  • Bozeman, MT – 1.5 hours to North Entrance
  • Cody, WY – 1.5 hours to East Entrance
  • Idaho Falls, ID – 2 hours to West Entrance
  • Billings, MT – 3 hours to North or Northeast Entrance
  • Missoula, MT – 4 hours to North Entrance
  • Twin Falls, ID – 4 hours to West Entrance
  • Salt Lake City, UT – 5 hours to West Entrance
  • Casper, WY – 5 hours to East or South Entrances
  • Boise, ID – 6 hours to West Entrance
  • Denver, CO – 8.5 hours to East or South Entrance

If you’re taking a national park road trip, these are the other nearby destinations:

  • Grand Teton National Park – 30 minutes to South Entrance
  • Glacier National Park – 6 hours to North Entrance
  • Theodore Roosevelt National Park – 7 hours to Northeast or East Entrance
  • Mount Rushmore National Memorial – 8 hours to East Entrance
  • Badlands National Park – 8 hours to East Entrance
  • Rocky Mountain National Park – 8.5 hours to South Entrance

Yellowstone's Old Faithful Inn from a distance

Where to Stay Near Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park offers eight lodges inside the park, in addition to a dozen campgrounds. I recommend staying inside the park for this Yellowstone itinerary if possible as it will save several hours a day in driving time.

To stay inside the park, you should aim to book lodging at least 9 to 12 months out and book reservable campgrounds six months out.

In the detailed Yellowstone itinerary below, I lay out the best places to stay each night of your trip. In general, these lodges are the most centrally located to the best activities in Yellowstone:

  1. Old Faithful Inn, a luxury inn walking distance to Old Faithful and Upper Geyser Basin
  2. Old Faithful Lodge & Cabins, a more budget-friendly lodge walking distance to Old Faithful and Upper Geyser Basin and open year-round
  3. Canyon Lodge & Cabins, a community of hotels and small cabins a short drive from Hayden Valley and Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone
  4. Lake Yellowstone Hotel & Cottages, a higher-end hotel overlooking Yellowstone Lake located 30 minutes from Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone and 1 hour from Old Faithful
  5. Lake Lodge Cabins, more budget-friendly cabins along Yellowstone Lake located 30 minutes from Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone and 1 hour from Old Faithful
  6. Grant Village Lodge, a waterfront hotel near West Thumb Geyser Basin found 30 minutes from Old Faithful and the Upper Geyser Basin

If you’re interested in camping, these are the most centrally located campgrounds for your Yellowstone itinerary:

    in Canyon Village, near Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone and Hayden Valley near Lake Village, close to Yellowstone Lake and West Thumb Geyser Basin near Lake Village, close to Yellowstone Lake and West Thumb Geyser Basin in Grant Village, close to Yellowstone Lake, West Thumb Geyser Basin, and the South Entrance , near the Firehole River, Grand Prismatic Spring, and the West Entrance

For more on the pros and cons of each campground, check out this post on camping in Yellowstone National Park.

If you’re planning on staying outside the park, I highly recommend finding a hotel in West Yellowstone. Compared to other nearby towns, staying here will give you the closest access to the top things to do in Yellowstone.

Some of the top hotels in West Yellowstone include:

  • 1872 Inn, an updated adults-only hotel with 18 guest rooms only minutes to the park entrance
  • The Evergreen, a mountain-inspired lodge with 17 guest rooms in the heart of West Yellowstone
  • Elkhorn Cabins and Inns, rustic cabins with 15 guest rooms just outside the Yellowstone park entrance

Remember that Yellowstone is a top-rated destination. In the summer months, even hotels outside the park will fill up several months in advance.

Therefore, I highly recommend booking your accommodations when you get your trip on the calendar.

Looking for more tips on where to stay for your trip to Yellowstone? Check out these guides on the Best Places to Stay Inside Yellowstone and 25 Amazing Airbnbs Near Yellowstone National Park

Tips for Planning a Trip to Yellowstone National Park

  • Book lodges inside the park one year in advance. Lodging is competitive inside the park, so you need to plan. Reservations are released roughly 12 months in advance. Campgrounds in Yellowstone should be reserved six months out. Aim to book hotels outside the park at least six months out.
  • Get a national park pass in advance. If you’re planning on visiting multiple national parks in the next year, you’ll save money by getting a national park pass. Purchasing it in advance saves you time at the busy Yellowstone entrance stations. Get your America the Beautiful Pass now for only $80.
  • Start your day early to avoid crowds. By 10 AM, parking lots are full, and trails are crowded. Avoid crowds by getting an early start around sunrise. I think the early morning light on the geysers and steaming pools is stunning. After 4 PM, crowds tend to clear out too, so early evening until sunset is also a great time to explore!
  • Pack plenty of layers. Temperatures in Yellowstone change dramatically from day to night. Even in the summer, overnight temperatures are often near freezing. Therefore, dressing in layers is critical. I recommend packing fleeces and down layers, plus a warm hat and gloves even when visiting in the summer!
  • Pack binoculars. One of the best things to do in Yellowstone is wildlife watching. A quality pair of binoculars helps you keep your distance from wildlife but still see the animals in their natural habitat. If you’re looking for an entry-level pair, I recommend this pair from Occer on Amazon. If you’re looking to level up your binoculars, I’ve invested in the high-quality (but still somewhat affordable) Vortex Diamondback 10×32.
  • Keep your distance from wildlife. While incredible to see, be sure to keep a safe distance and give all wild animals plenty of room. Stay 25 yards away from bison, female elk, deer, and moose. You should stay 100 yards away from more aggressive animals like bears, wolves, and bull elk during rutting season.
  • Always carry bear spray when hiking. Yellowstone National Park is located in grizzly bear country. If you are doing any hikes or long strolls in the geyser basins, you should carry bear spray (like pepper spray for bears!). If you’re driving to Yellowstone, I recommend buying bear spray ahead of time. If you are flying to Yellowstone, you can buy it locally from any sporting goods store or rent it (you can’t fly with bear spray, even in a checked bag!).
  • Check road conditions before your trip. The conditions in Yellowstone National Park are constantly changing. The best way to stay up to date on road closures for weather or construction, as well as trail status for wildlife activity, is on the Yellowstone National Park conditions website.
  • Allow extra time to get places. Due to the plentiful wildlife, it’s common to have traffic jams from bison crossing or animals along the road. Allow plenty of time to get anywhere and remain calm when stuck in traffic. If you do choose to stop to look at wildlife, respect other drivers and be sure to pull off the road and not block traffic.
  • Take the first day to acclimate to the elevation. The Yellowstone Caldera is located above 9,000 feet. If you’re coming from a lower elevation place, it will take a few days to acclimate to the elevation in Yellowstone. I recommend saving your more strenuous activities for later on in your trip and spending the first few days doing scenic drives or easy hikes through the geyser basins.
  • Cell phone service in Yellowstone is limited. Be sure to download all reservations, confirmations, and maps offline before entering the park. I like to save all information in an offline Dropbox or Google Drive folder and take a screenshot.
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Looking for more tips on what to pack for your trip? Check out my guides on the best hiking gear, what to pack for a road trip, and essential camping gear for all my favorite gear picks and tips to make packing for your trip a breeze!

One Day in Yellowstone National Park

If you only have one day in Yellowstone National Park, you’ll want to stick to seeing only the most popular destinations. Yellowstone is most renowned for its impressive geysers, pools, and hot springs.

For that reason, I recommend spending most of your time in the Old Faithful area.

If you have one day, the must-see destinations include Old Faithful, Upper Geyser Basin, Grand Prismatic Spring, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, and Hayden Valley.

Are you planning a national park trip but don’t know where to start? Get my free 28-page national park ebook where I break down everything you need to know to visit all 63 USA national parks.

One Day Yellowstone Itinerary

Below is the sample one day in Yellowstone itinerary.

Morning: Old Faithful and Upper Geyser Basin.
Start your day early at Old Faithful, which erupts every 1.5 hours. Check the geyser prediction schedule the night before to determine when to arrive. After catching the Old Faithful eruption from the viewing area, explore the rest of the Upper Geyser Basin. Don’t miss Grand Riverside Geyser, Chromatic Pool, and Morning Glory Pool! Finally, end your time here at the Old Faithful Inn and Visitor Center.

Early morning sunrise as Old Faithful erupts in Yellowstone

Early Afternoon: Grand Prismatic Spring. Only a short drive from Old Faithful, you’ll find the second most famous landmark. However, the best way to see the geyser is from above via the Fairy Falls Trail. This 1.6-mile hike is relatively easy and provides fantastic views. If you aren’t up for the hike, you can also see Grand Prismatic, a short walk from the Midway Geyser Basin parking lot.

Multi-colored rainbow hot springs - Grand Prismatic in Yellowstone

Late Afternoon: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. After you’ve had your fill of geysers and springs, head across Grand Loop Road to the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. Drive the South Rim road to Artist Point for excellent views of the canyon and Lower Falls. Drive the North Rim, too, stopping at Lookout Point if you have time.

River winds through Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

Evening: Hayden Valley. End your one day in Yellowstone with Hayden Valley, an excellent destination to spot wildlife. Drive through the valley and find a spot to sit and watch for animals. Expect to see plenty of bison. If you’re lucky, you may also spot elk, moose, grizzly bears, and bald eagles!

Where to Stay: Canyon Village. If you’re ending your day in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone or Hayden Valley, the most convenient place to stay is in Canyon Village. If you’re staying outside the park, the closest place to stay is in West Yellowstone, about 1 hour away.

2 Day Yellowstone Itinerary

With two days in Yellowstone, you’ll explore the same destinations as in the one-day itinerary but at a more leisurely pace. I highly recommend spending two days in Yellowstone instead of one day to avoid feeling overwhelmed.

Below is the sample itinerary for spending two days in Yellowstone National Park.

Day 1: Old Faithful, Upper Geyser Basin, & Grand Prismatic Spring

Morning: Old Faithful and Upper Geyser Basin. Start your day early at Old Faithful, which erupts every 1.5 hours. Check the geyser prediction schedule the night before to determine when to arrive. After catching the Old Faithful eruption from the viewing area, explore the rest of the Upper Geyser Basin for at least 2 hours. Don’t miss Grand Riverside Geyser, Chromatic Pool, and Morning Glory Pool! End your time here at the Old Faithful Inn (you can watch Old Faithful erupt from the lodge’s deck!) and explore the displays at the visitor center.

Yellow and green hot spring, Morning Glory Pool in Yellowstone

Early Afternoon: Biscuit Basin. Located between Old Faithful and Grand Prismatic, this small geyser basin deserves a quick visit. The most notable feature here is the brightly colored Sapphire Pool. Don’t miss the multi-colored Mustard Spring or Jewel Geyser either.

Mid Afternoon: Grand Prismatic Spring Overlook via Fairy Falls Trail. Continue past Biscuit Basin to the Fairy Falls Trailhead. This 1.6-mile hike allows you to see Grand Prismatic Spring from above. If you aren’t interested in exploring the Midway Geyser Basin more, consider adding the entire hike to Fairy Falls instead.

View of Grand Prismatic Hot Springs from the side

Late Afternoon: Grand Prismatic Spring in the Midway Geyser Basin. After seeing Grand Prismatic from above, you can get an up-close look by walking the Midway Geyser Basin. This route is more accessible and better for those unable to hike to the overlook.

Where to Stay: Old Faithful or Canyon Village. You can either choose to stay close by in Old Faithful or make the drive over to Canyon Village, where you’ll spend your time on day 2. If you’re staying outside the park, the closest place to stay is in West Yellowstone, about 45 minutes away.

Day 2: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone & Hayden Valley

Early Morning: Hayden Valley. Start your second and final day in Yellowstone with a scenic drive through Hayden Valley. Keep your eyes peeled for any wildlife (most likely bison). Morning is one of my favorite times to drive through Hayden Valley as a stark contrast in temperature from the air and hydrothermal features create mystical steam.

Bison grazes in a field in Yellowstone's Hayden Valley

Mid Morning: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone South Rim. Head to the South Rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone first. After sunrise, it takes a few hours for the light to permeate the canyon and Yellowstone River, so I don’t recommend arriving until 9 or 10 AM. Don’t miss Artist Point and Upper Falls Viewpoint. If you’re up for a strenuous hike in Yellowstone, take the Uncle Tom’s Trail (be prepared for hundreds of steps!).

Sunset over a distant waterfall in Yellowstone

Early Afternoon: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone North Rim. The light is better on the canyon’s North Rim by early afternoon. It’s a one-way loop through the North Rim, so I recommend stopping at the viewpoints in order. Don’t miss Lookout Point, Grand View, and Inspiration Point. Also, try the steep Brink of the Lower Falls or Red Rock Point trails if you want to hike.

Yellow, green, and blue hot spring overlooking Yellowstone Lake

Late Afternoon: West Thumb Geyser Basin. After seeing the Grand Canyon, head back through Hayden Valley to the West Thumb Geyser Basin, stopping to see Yellowstone Lake along the way. Also, don’t miss the Abyss Pool, Fishing Cone, and Black Pool. If you’re staying in Old Faithful the night before, another option is to visit West Thumb Geyser Basin first before heading through Hayden Valley in the morning.

Where to Stay: Grant Village, Canyon Village, or Old Faithful. If you don’t mind a bit of extra driving, stay at the same place you choose for night one! The closest place to stay is in Grant Village. If you’re heading to Grand Teton next, consider heading down and spending the night there. West Yellowstone is also an option, about 1 hour 15 minutes from West Thumb.

3 Day Yellowstone Itinerary

For three days in Yellowstone National Park, you’ll follow the same 2-day Yellowstone itinerary above. Then, one day 3, you’ll venture up to the northern part of the park to see Lamar Valley and Mammoth Hot Springs.

For all the details on Day 1 and Day 2, refer to the previous section. In addition, you’ll find a quick recap on the first two days below.

Day 1: Old Faithful, Upper Geyser Basin, & Grand Prismatic Spring

  • Morning: Old Faithful and Upper Geyser Basin
  • Early Afternoon: Biscuit Basin
  • Mid Afternoon: Grand Prismatic Spring Overlook via Fairy Falls Trail
  • Late Afternoon: Grand Prismatic Spring in the Midway Geyser Basin
  • Where to Stay: Old Faithful, Canyon Village, or West Yellowstone

Day 2: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone & Hayden Valley

  • Early Morning: Hayden Valley (optional stop at West Thumb Geyser Basin if staying in Old Faithful the night before)
  • Mid Morning: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone South Rim
  • Early Afternoon: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone North Rim
  • Late Afternoon: West Thumb Geyser Basin
  • Where to Stay: Canyon Village or Old Faithful

Day 3: Norris Geyser Basin, Mammoth Hot Springs, & Lamar Valley

Morning: Norris Geyser Basin. Start your last day in Yellowstone with a trip to the Norris Geyser Basin. It is made up of two smaller geyser basins: Porcelain Basin and Back Basin. Unless Steamboat Geyser is predicted to erupt (which is rare), I recommend skipping the Back Basin and just exploring the Porcelain Basin.

Blue creek flows through ground in Norris Geyser Basin

Afternoon: Mammoth Hot Springs. Head north along Grand Loop Road from Norris to read Mammoth, a small village near the North Entrance of Yellowstone. Mammoth Hot Springs is made up of a Lower and Upper Terrace. I recommend walking through the Lower Terrace and skipping the drive-through Upper Terrace if you’re short on time. After seeing Mammoth Hot Springs, walk through the village, checking out the Albright Visitor Center.

Travertine terraces in Mammoth Hot Springs

Evening: Lamar Valley. End your trip to Yellowstone with wildlife watching in Lamar Valley, one of the premier wildlife destinations in the park. Keep your eyes peeled for bison, bears, coyotes, and even wolves! If you stick around after sunset, you may hear wolves howling in the distance. Don’t forget your binoculars as the wildlife might be far away.

Bison crossing the road in Lamar Valley in Yellowstone

Where to Stay: Mammoth, Canyon Village, or Gardiner. While there is a lodge in the Tower-Roosevelt area, I recommend heading back to other park areas with more options. Canyon Village and Mammoth are each about 1 hour away. If you’re staying outside the park, consider staying in Gardiner or Cooke City-Silver Gate, depending on where you’re heading next.

4 Day Yellowstone Itinerary

In my opinion, four days in Yellowstone National Park is the perfect amount of time to see all the top attractions and the best things to do. In 4 days, you can cover everything, from Old Faithful to a stunning panoramic hike – all at a leisurely pace without feeling too overwhelmed.

Here is the best 4 days in Yellowstone itinerary.

Day 1: Old Faithful, Upper Geyser Basin, & Grand Prismatic Spring

  • Morning: Old Faithful and Upper Geyser Basin
  • Early Afternoon: Biscuit Basin
  • Mid Afternoon: Grand Prismatic Spring Overlook via Fairy Falls Trail
  • Late Afternoon: Grand Prismatic Spring in the Midway Geyser Basin
  • Where to Stay: Old Faithful, Canyon Village, or West Yellowstone

Day 2: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone & Hayden Valley

  • Early Morning: Hayden Valley (optional stop at West Thumb Geyser Basin if staying in Old Faithful the night before)
  • Mid Morning: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone South Rim
  • Early Afternoon: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone North Rim
  • Late Afternoon: West Thumb Geyser Basin
  • Where to Stay: Canyon Village or Old Faithful

Day 3: Norris Geyser Basin, Mammoth Hot Springs, & Lamar Valley

  • Morning: Norris Geyser Basin
  • Afternoon: Mammoth Hot Springs
  • Evening: Lamar Valley
  • Where to Stay: Canyon Village or Tower-Roosevelt

Day 4: Mount Washburn & Hayden Valley

Morning: Hike Mount Washburn. This incredible panoramic trail is routinely rated as one of the top hikes in Yellowstone National Park. The 6.8-mile hike starts at Dunraven Pass and takes you to the summit of Mount Washburn, standing at 10,200 feet. If you’re looking for an easier route, the trail is only 5.6 miles if you start from Chittenden Road instead (but it’s somewhat less scenic!).

Sign reading 'Mount Washburn' in Yellowstone

Early Afternoon: Tower Fall. After hiking Mount Washburn, stop at the nearby viewpoint for Tower Fall. This impressive and picturesque waterfall only requires a quick visit, but it is well worth your time. The viewpoint from Tower Fall Overlook looks down upon the 132-foot cascade and is an accessible side trip.

Waterfall framed by trees and rock spires at Tower Fall

Evening: Hayden Valley. End your last night in Yellowstone with another sunset in Hayden Valley. Find a spot to sit, relax, and watch for wildlife. The best way to spot wildlife is to stake out and wait. Don’t forget to bring binoculars or a spotting scope!

Sunset over a field and river in Hayden Valley in Yellowstone

Where to Stay: Canyon Village or West Yellowstone. Canyon Village is closest to Hayden Valley. If you’re heading to Grand Teton next, consider staying in Lake Village or Grant Village instead for a shorter drive the next day. West Yellowstone is also an option, about 1 hour 20 minutes from Hayden Valley.

5 Day Yellowstone Itinerary

If you’re looking for the ultimate experience, consider spending five days in Yellowstone National Park! In addition to the four-day suggested Yellowstone itinerary listed above, you can choose your adventure for the final day.

This Yellowstone 5 day itinerary is the ultimate way to see the park

On your last day in Yellowstone, consider one of these options:

  • Rent a boat on Yellowstone Lake. There are plenty of options for exploring this massive lake. Options include a scenic cruise, private boat rentals, and guided sightseeing and fishing tours. Read more about boat rentals and tours in Yellowstone.
  • Drive Beartooth Highway. This scenic drive just outside the Northeast entrance of Yellowstone is rated as one of the best in the United States. If you’re heading out of the park on your last day, this is a great option (although it’s only open in the summer!).
  • Hike Beaver Ponds Loop Trail. This easy 5-mile trail provides excellent opportunities for spotting wildlife in the Mammoth Hot Springs area.
  • Go for a swim at Boiling River Hot Springs or Firehole Canyon. If you’re looking for an excellent option for activity kids, check out Boiling River Hot Springs near Mammoth or Firehole Canyon swimming hole near Madison. Both offer excellent swimming opportunities for a more relaxed day after several days of touring Yellowstone.

If You Have More Time in Yellowstone National Park

If you have more than five days to spend in Yellowstone, I highly recommend checking out more of the best things to do! Here are some ideas:

  • Hike the Fairy Falls Trail
  • Take a scenic tour of Firehole Canyon Drive
  • Visit the Lower Geyser Basin, checking out both Fountain Paint Pot and Great Fountain Geyser
  • Visit Mud Volcano
  • Drive the scenic Blacktail Plateau Drive near Mammoth
  • Check out Roosevelt Arch at the North Entrance

Are you looking for more activities in Yellowstone? Check out these posts on the 22 best things to do in Yellowstone and the 15 best hikes in Yellowstone.

Stone archway over the Yellowstone National Park entrance

Don’t miss these nearby national park destinations if you’re looking to extend your national park road trip!

  • Grand Teton National Park – 30 minutes to South Entrance
  • Glacier National Park – 6 hours to North Entrance
  • Theodore Roosevelt National Park – 7 hours to Northeast or East Entrance
  • Mount Rushmore National Memorial – 8 hours to East Entrance
  • Badlands National Park – 8 hours to East Entrance
  • Rocky Mountain National Park – 8.5 hours to South Entrance

Frequently Asked Questions About Yellowstone Itineraries

How many days do you need in Yellowstone National Park?

At a minimum, you need 2 to 3 days in Yellowstone National Park. This gives you enough time to see all the highlights without feeling too rushed. However, if you only have one day, you can see the top attractions.

How many days do you need in Yellowstone and Grand Teton?

To see the highlights of both Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Park, you’ll need at least 5 to 7 days. This gives you about three days in Yellowstone and two days in Grand Teton. To explore both parks further, I recommend ten days.

How long does it take to drive the entire Yellowstone Loop?

Driving the Grand Loop Road around Yellowstone takes about 4 to 8 hours, depending on how frequently you stop. I recommend spending a full day on the scenic drive, stopping to see wildlife and popular attractions.

Is 3 days in Yellowstone enough?

Three days in Yellowstone is enough time to see all the highlights in the park without feeling rushed. You’ll be able to see top attractions like Old Faithful, Grand Prismatic, and Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone.

Is 5 days in Yellowstone enough?

Five days in Yellowstone provides enough time to see nearly everything Yellowstone offers. In 5 days, you can see top attractions, hike popular trails, and see plenty of wildlife and scenic drives.

How many days does it take to drive through Yellowstone?

To see all of Yellowstone, you’ll need at least 2 to 3 days to drive throughout the park. However, the Grand Loop Road connects all the park’s top attractions and allows you to navigate the park easily over several days.

Can you drive through Yellowstone in a day?

You can visit Yellowstone National Park in one day if you are only interested in seeing the top attractions. For example, in one day, you can see both Old Faithful and Grand Prismatic Spring, the most popular spots in Yellowstone.

Can you just drive through Yellowstone National Park?

Grand Loop Road connects all the entrances to Yellowstone. While you can drive directly through Yellowstone National Park, you will be required to pay the entry fee at the park entrance station.

Final Thoughts on This Itinerary for Yellowstone

I highly recommend spending at least two days in Yellowstone National Park. This gives you just enough time to explore the park’s top attractions without feeling too rushed.

Personally, my ideal Yellowstone itinerary is three days, as shown below:

  • Day 1: Old Faithful, Upper Geyser Basin, & Grand Prismatic Spring
  • Day 2: Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone & Hayden Valley
  • Day 3: Norris Geyser Basin, Mammoth Hot Springs, & Lamar Valley

I also highly recommend adding Grand Teton National Park to your trip. Located only 30 minutes south of Yellowstone National Park, it provides incredible scenery and hiking, plus plenty of wildlife.

If you want to learn more about Yellowstone National Park, check out these posts!

  • Add Grand Teton:7 Day Grand Teton & Yellowstone Road Trip
  • Things to Do:22 Best Things to Do in Yellowstone
  • Hikes:15 Best Hikes in Yellowstone
  • Getting There:8 Best Airports and Flights to Yellowstone
  • When to Visit:The Best Time to Visit Yellowstone
  • Where to Stay:Where to Stay in Yellowstone
  • Camping:12 Best Campgrounds in Yellowstone
  • Airbnbs Nearby:25 Incredible Airbnbs Near Yellowstone
  • From Salt Lake City:8-Day Salt Lake to Yellowstone Road Trip

Are you planning a national park trip but don’t know where to start? Get my free 28-page national park ebook where I break down everything you need to know to visit all 63 USA national parks.

Source https://www.earthtrekkers.com/yellowstone-itinerary-1-to-5-days-in-yellowstone/

Source https://thepointsguy.com/guide/yellowstone-national-park/

Source https://www.wellplannedjourney.com/yellowstone-itinerary/

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