The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon

Some people think of Oregon as a rainy state located on the West Coast. What they do not know is Oregon is home to some of the highest mountains, densest forests, and breathtaking shorelines located in the U.S.! All of those environmental factors make Oregon a paragliding haven. Since there are hundreds of options of where to paraglide in Oregon, we have narrowed it down to the top ten places to paraglide!

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon

If you are new to this and you want to have a safe paragliding experience, Black Cap will be the ideal option. It is only 5,317 feet. For paragliders, such a height isn’t challenging at all because they can go higher to an extreme height of 18,000 feet. If you fly from this point and descend below, you will be pampered with breathtaking views of the nearby mountains and the town. Reaching the mountain is relatively easy – you can access the dirt trail. It will lead you to the launching spot.

There are some of the best paragliding spots in Oregon known for their unique terrain and challenging geography. Oregon is most known as the rainy state on the West Coast area. However, not many people know that this place has its own unique geographical elements and contours, especially in the combination of dense forest, amazing shorelines, and also the highest mountains.

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon

In fact, if you are looking for the densest forest or the highest mountains, you should be able to find one easily in Oregon. Because of these factors, Oregon is often considered ideal as a paragliding point or even haven. The difficult thing is that there are countless options for paragliding there. That’s why there are some of the best spots with their unique features and characteristics.

Paragliding in Black Cap

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon: Black Cap

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon: Black Cap

For a less extreme Oregon paragliding experience, check out Black Cap Mountain! This mountain is only 5,371 feet, and in paragliding terms, that is not extremely high (paragliders can legally fly up to 18,000 feet!). While descending, you will be able to see the local town and nearby mountains.
Black Cap Mountain can be accessed by a dirt trail that leads to the launching spot.

Paragliding in Doherty Slide

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon: Doherty Slide

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon: Doherty Slide

Another less extreme Oregon paragliding experience can be found at Doherty Slide. Located in southeastern Oregon, Doherty Slide is rim that was created by a volcano. Surrounded by acres of shrubs, this is the perfect location for paragliding! With a 6,175 foot launch, and an area perfect for glass-offs, this is the perfect location to practice your paragliding while soaking in the crisp Oregon air!

This is another paragliding spot that is safe and ideal for beginner gliders. This spot is situated in the southeastern area of Oregon. Another unique thing about this rim is that it was created naturally by a volcano. The rim is also surrounded by shrubs that can go miles away. The launch platform is 6,175 feet, making it one of the best paragliding spots in Oregon – and also the safest. Want to know the extra perk? You can enjoy the crisp and fresh air while enjoying the gorgeous view.

Paragliding in Hadley Butte

Paragliding in Hadley Butte

Paragliding in Hadley Butte

Located near Fremont National Forest, Hadley Butte sits at 6,000 feet. Hadley Butte is popular for paragliders because of the flat launch and the gorgeous scenery. While descending the northern section, you will be overlooking Summer Lake and Summer Lake Hot Springs, two of Oregon’s most popular nature sights.

This area is 6,000 feet in height. The location is close to Fremont National Forest. What makes this spot popular (especially among paragliders) is the gorgeous view and the flat launch. Once you are up there and you descend below, you will enjoy the view of Hot Springs and Summer Lake – which are Oregon’s two most popular sights and destinations.

Paragliding in Hagelstein (Upper Klamath Lake)

Paragliding in Hagelstein (Upper Klamath Lake)

Paragliding in Hagelstein (Upper Klamath Lake)

Hagelstein, located near Upper Klamath Lake is a popular spot for Oregon paragliders. In order to get to the flying spot, travel the paved road that is located north of Hagelstein Park. When you land, you should land in a huge field next to Hagelstein Park. Aside from Hagelstein’s technicalities, Hagelstein is a popular location due to the gorgeous lake and mountain scenery you will view as you paraglide.
Some of the risks you should be aware of are; landing in an uncut field and an increased wind speed, due to the close proximity to the lake.

This is another best paragliding spots in Oregonas well as the popular one. Getting to the launch spot is quite simple and pretty straightforward. You need to take the paved road which is on the northern side of Hagelstein Park. There are alsoother highlights to the spot – the mountain scenery and the beautiful lake. You won’t be able to find such a view and scenery elsewhere. When you soar to the sky, the fresh air and the natural view will welcome you. When you descend, you will land on a field (a big and wide one) close to Hagelstein Park. Despite the natural and breathtaking views, you should be careful of the risks, including an unexpected wind speed (usually an increased one) and landing in the uncut field.

Paragliding in Mount Bachelor

Paragliding in Mount Bachelor

Paragliding in Mount Bachelor

Sitting at 9,065 feet in central Oregon is Mt. Bachelor. Most people know Mt. Bachelor as a popular skiing location, but Mt. Bachelor is also great for paragliding! When paragliding Mt. Bachelor, you will launch from the summit. Unlike other ski resorts that allow paragliding, Mt. Bachelor forbids you to land in the parking lot. Thus, you must land towards the base foundation of the Skyliner chairlift—aka the designated landing area.

It should also be noted that in order to paraglide at Mt. Bachelor, you have to be accompanied by a paraglider guide from the Desert Air Riders paragliding club. Thus, Mt. Bachelor is the perfect Oregon paragliding location for beginners.

A benefit for paragliding at Mt. Bachelor is that there is a chairlift to the summit, and paragliders can purchase a pass that is good for multiple days and rides. Thus, feel free to descend as much as you would like during your time in Oregon!

Although this location is most popular as the skiing spot, it is also popular among paragliders. The mountain is 9.065 feet in height, located in Central Oregon. However, if you want to paraglide from this place, the ski resort won’t allow you to use the parking lot as a landing spot. You have to landin the designated area, which is located at the Skyliner chairlift base foundation. Another regulation is that you need to have a paraglider guide to accompany you – and the guide should be from the Desert Air Riders club. Because of these reasons, this spot is perfect for beginner and the less experienced paragliders.There is another perk of coming to this site: you can use the chairlift to reach the summit. So you won’t have to break excessive sweat for it. Moreover, you can buy a pass that can be used for multiple rides and days. You have the freedom to fly and descend as many as you want. No wonder if this place is included in the list of the best paragliding spots in Oregon.

Paragliding in Peterson Butte

Paragliding in Peterson Butte

Paragliding in Peterson Butte

Located near Oregon State University, Peterson Butte is perfect for someone looking for an authentic Oregon paragliding experience! Sitting at 1,439 feet, this mountain is perfect for paragliders who are not ready to descend from large heights. Since the mountain is not too tall, it is easy to hike to the summit. Once at the summit, launch into the air!
While Peterson Butte seems like the perfect beginner area, there are some weather hazards that you should be aware of. Some of the unsuitable weather conditions are; increased wind speed and an abundance of clouds and fog. Weather conditions can truly become unsuitable during the springtime. Before descending Peterson Butte, ensure that you can detect changing weather conditions, and when to make the call to launch or not.
Note: in order to descend Peterson Butte you have to have a U.S. Hang Gliding and Paragliding Association (USHPA) membership.

The place isn’t so high so it is great for beginner paragliders. Because of the not-so-high spot, hiking up will be easy. Moreover, it is not far from Oregon State University. Don’t be easily fooled by the simple and seemingly safe point. Don’t let your guards down. Weather hazards are some of the things you should be careful of, such astheabundance of clouds, increased speed of the wind, and also fog. During springs, the weather condition can be unpredictable and dangerous. Moreover, to use this spot, you need to be a member of USHPA (United States Hang Gliding and Paragliding Association).

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Paragliding in Pine Mountain

Paragliding in Pine Mountain

Paragliding in Pine Mountain

Located in central Oregon, Pine Mt. is one of the only mountains in central Oregon (central Oregon is mostly comprised of the flat desert landscape). Standing at 6,509 feet, Pine Mt. is one of the taller paragliding areas on this list. Surrounded by tons of trees, paragliding Pine Mt. will be an authentic woodsy experience. After paragliding Pine Mt., be sure to check out the Pine Observatory!

This is the only mountain situated in central Oregon. In case you don’t know, central Oregon consists ofthemostly desert and flat landscape. Not only the mountain is tall, but it has its own woodsy area, thanks to the trees. If you paraglide from this point, you will enjoy the authentic nature exploration and experience. You can also find Pine Observatory while you are at it.

Paragliding in Pine Ridge

Paragliding in Pine Ridge

Paragliding in Pine Ridge

Located in central Oregon, Pine Ridge is a one-mile long ridge compiled with various launching options. Thus, Pine Ridge will give you a truly unique Oregon paragliding experience. Easily accessible, every launch located in Pine Ridge can be located by walking. If you want a shorter flight, check out the north and northwest areas.

Before launching, make sure to check the weather. Since every launch is located below ridge top, winds tend to be strong.

It should be noted that part of the year the National Grasslands forbid driving off primary roads. So, make plans to walk.

The ridge is one mile long and it comes with different launching points. Because of these factors, you will experience a unique paragliding moment at this spot. Every launching spot is easily accessed – each of them can be reached on foot. The shorter flight is located on the northwest and north areas. Be aware of the winds, though, because the launching spots are all located under the ridge top. Always check the weather before launching. Be prepared to walk if the National Grassland doesn’t allow driving.

Paragliding in Woodrat Mountain

Paragliding in Woodrat Mountain

Paragliding in Woodrat Mountain

One of the most popular and raved about Oregon paragliding spots is Woodrat Mountain. Sitting at 3,780 feet Woodrat Mountain is located in southwestern Oregon. Launch off the large and wide opened gravel area. Expect to land near a cow pasture.

After landing, be sure to follow the following rules; no dogs, no smoking, no vehicles inside the gated area, no littering, and no alcohol.

It should also be noted that the Main LZ launch can be especially dangerous mid-season, due to the air which causes difficulty landing.

One of the most raved and also the best paragliding spots in Oregon isthe Woodrat Mountain, situated in the southwestern area of Oregon. The launch spot is the open and wide gravel area while the landing spot is usually not far from the cow pasture. After you land, follow the regulations which include no littering, no alcohol, no smoking, no vehicles (inside the gated zone), and no dogs.

Paragliding in Yaquina Head

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon: Yaquina Head

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon: Yaquina Head

Our final Oregon paragliding area is located on the western shoreline of Oregon. Yaquina Head is home to a rocky launch area. Plan to land in a grassy area that is located in close proximity to the visitor center. If you do not want to land near the visitor center, you can stretch your flight to the east and land on the beach. Overall, Yaquina Head is the perfect place for coastal soaring in Oregon!
It should be advised that coastal winds can change abruptly. Ensure that you can detect changing weather conditions, and can make the right call of what to do. Also, you cannot fly near the lighthouse because seabirds nest in that area.

This area is situated on the shoreline western side of Oregon. The launch area is rocky but the landing spot is grassy – not far from the visitor center. However, if you don’t want to land there, you can fly to the eastern area and land on the beach. If you are looking for an ideal coastal soaring place, this one is the perfect pick! However, be advised that coastal winds can be super challenging and dangerous. Make plans to avoid flying close to the lighthouse and always make sure that the weather condition is safe for the launch.

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon

As it was mentioned, Oregon has some of the most unique combinations of geographical elements, such as the mountains, the forest, and the shorelines. These combinations are unique and they will create a unique paragliding experience to feast your eyes. However, you should never let your guards down, especially when it comes to the weather hazards. The weather can be risky and dangerous so you should always be prepared and careful. If you prepare everything carefully and you have a backup plan, you will enjoy the best paragliding spots in Oregon.

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon

Some people think of Oregon as a rainy state located on the West Coast. What they do not know is Oregon is home to some of the highest mountains, densest forests, and breathtaking shorelines located in the U.S.! All of those environmental factors make Oregon a paragliding haven. Since there are hundreds of options of where to paraglide in Oregon, we have narrowed it down to the top ten places to paraglide!

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon

If you are new to this and you want to have a safe paragliding experience, Black Cap will be the ideal option. It is only 5,317 feet. For paragliders, such a height isn’t challenging at all because they can go higher to an extreme height of 18,000 feet. If you fly from this point and descend below, you will be pampered with breathtaking views of the nearby mountains and the town. Reaching the mountain is relatively easy – you can access the dirt trail. It will lead you to the launching spot.

There are some of the best paragliding spots in Oregon known for their unique terrain and challenging geography. Oregon is most known as the rainy state on the West Coast area. However, not many people know that this place has its own unique geographical elements and contours, especially in the combination of dense forest, amazing shorelines, and also the highest mountains.

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon

In fact, if you are looking for the densest forest or the highest mountains, you should be able to find one easily in Oregon. Because of these factors, Oregon is often considered ideal as a paragliding point or even haven. The difficult thing is that there are countless options for paragliding there. That’s why there are some of the best spots with their unique features and characteristics.

Paragliding in Black Cap

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon: Black Cap

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon: Black Cap

For a less extreme Oregon paragliding experience, check out Black Cap Mountain! This mountain is only 5,371 feet, and in paragliding terms, that is not extremely high (paragliders can legally fly up to 18,000 feet!). While descending, you will be able to see the local town and nearby mountains.
Black Cap Mountain can be accessed by a dirt trail that leads to the launching spot.

Paragliding in Doherty Slide

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon: Doherty Slide

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon: Doherty Slide

Another less extreme Oregon paragliding experience can be found at Doherty Slide. Located in southeastern Oregon, Doherty Slide is rim that was created by a volcano. Surrounded by acres of shrubs, this is the perfect location for paragliding! With a 6,175 foot launch, and an area perfect for glass-offs, this is the perfect location to practice your paragliding while soaking in the crisp Oregon air!

This is another paragliding spot that is safe and ideal for beginner gliders. This spot is situated in the southeastern area of Oregon. Another unique thing about this rim is that it was created naturally by a volcano. The rim is also surrounded by shrubs that can go miles away. The launch platform is 6,175 feet, making it one of the best paragliding spots in Oregon – and also the safest. Want to know the extra perk? You can enjoy the crisp and fresh air while enjoying the gorgeous view.

Paragliding in Hadley Butte

Paragliding in Hadley Butte

Paragliding in Hadley Butte

Located near Fremont National Forest, Hadley Butte sits at 6,000 feet. Hadley Butte is popular for paragliders because of the flat launch and the gorgeous scenery. While descending the northern section, you will be overlooking Summer Lake and Summer Lake Hot Springs, two of Oregon’s most popular nature sights.

This area is 6,000 feet in height. The location is close to Fremont National Forest. What makes this spot popular (especially among paragliders) is the gorgeous view and the flat launch. Once you are up there and you descend below, you will enjoy the view of Hot Springs and Summer Lake – which are Oregon’s two most popular sights and destinations.

Paragliding in Hagelstein (Upper Klamath Lake)

Paragliding in Hagelstein (Upper Klamath Lake)

Paragliding in Hagelstein (Upper Klamath Lake)

Hagelstein, located near Upper Klamath Lake is a popular spot for Oregon paragliders. In order to get to the flying spot, travel the paved road that is located north of Hagelstein Park. When you land, you should land in a huge field next to Hagelstein Park. Aside from Hagelstein’s technicalities, Hagelstein is a popular location due to the gorgeous lake and mountain scenery you will view as you paraglide.
Some of the risks you should be aware of are; landing in an uncut field and an increased wind speed, due to the close proximity to the lake.

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This is another best paragliding spots in Oregonas well as the popular one. Getting to the launch spot is quite simple and pretty straightforward. You need to take the paved road which is on the northern side of Hagelstein Park. There are alsoother highlights to the spot – the mountain scenery and the beautiful lake. You won’t be able to find such a view and scenery elsewhere. When you soar to the sky, the fresh air and the natural view will welcome you. When you descend, you will land on a field (a big and wide one) close to Hagelstein Park. Despite the natural and breathtaking views, you should be careful of the risks, including an unexpected wind speed (usually an increased one) and landing in the uncut field.

Paragliding in Mount Bachelor

Paragliding in Mount Bachelor

Paragliding in Mount Bachelor

Sitting at 9,065 feet in central Oregon is Mt. Bachelor. Most people know Mt. Bachelor as a popular skiing location, but Mt. Bachelor is also great for paragliding! When paragliding Mt. Bachelor, you will launch from the summit. Unlike other ski resorts that allow paragliding, Mt. Bachelor forbids you to land in the parking lot. Thus, you must land towards the base foundation of the Skyliner chairlift—aka the designated landing area.

It should also be noted that in order to paraglide at Mt. Bachelor, you have to be accompanied by a paraglider guide from the Desert Air Riders paragliding club. Thus, Mt. Bachelor is the perfect Oregon paragliding location for beginners.

A benefit for paragliding at Mt. Bachelor is that there is a chairlift to the summit, and paragliders can purchase a pass that is good for multiple days and rides. Thus, feel free to descend as much as you would like during your time in Oregon!

Although this location is most popular as the skiing spot, it is also popular among paragliders. The mountain is 9.065 feet in height, located in Central Oregon. However, if you want to paraglide from this place, the ski resort won’t allow you to use the parking lot as a landing spot. You have to landin the designated area, which is located at the Skyliner chairlift base foundation. Another regulation is that you need to have a paraglider guide to accompany you – and the guide should be from the Desert Air Riders club. Because of these reasons, this spot is perfect for beginner and the less experienced paragliders.There is another perk of coming to this site: you can use the chairlift to reach the summit. So you won’t have to break excessive sweat for it. Moreover, you can buy a pass that can be used for multiple rides and days. You have the freedom to fly and descend as many as you want. No wonder if this place is included in the list of the best paragliding spots in Oregon.

Paragliding in Peterson Butte

Paragliding in Peterson Butte

Paragliding in Peterson Butte

Located near Oregon State University, Peterson Butte is perfect for someone looking for an authentic Oregon paragliding experience! Sitting at 1,439 feet, this mountain is perfect for paragliders who are not ready to descend from large heights. Since the mountain is not too tall, it is easy to hike to the summit. Once at the summit, launch into the air!
While Peterson Butte seems like the perfect beginner area, there are some weather hazards that you should be aware of. Some of the unsuitable weather conditions are; increased wind speed and an abundance of clouds and fog. Weather conditions can truly become unsuitable during the springtime. Before descending Peterson Butte, ensure that you can detect changing weather conditions, and when to make the call to launch or not.
Note: in order to descend Peterson Butte you have to have a U.S. Hang Gliding and Paragliding Association (USHPA) membership.

The place isn’t so high so it is great for beginner paragliders. Because of the not-so-high spot, hiking up will be easy. Moreover, it is not far from Oregon State University. Don’t be easily fooled by the simple and seemingly safe point. Don’t let your guards down. Weather hazards are some of the things you should be careful of, such astheabundance of clouds, increased speed of the wind, and also fog. During springs, the weather condition can be unpredictable and dangerous. Moreover, to use this spot, you need to be a member of USHPA (United States Hang Gliding and Paragliding Association).

Paragliding in Pine Mountain

Paragliding in Pine Mountain

Paragliding in Pine Mountain

Located in central Oregon, Pine Mt. is one of the only mountains in central Oregon (central Oregon is mostly comprised of the flat desert landscape). Standing at 6,509 feet, Pine Mt. is one of the taller paragliding areas on this list. Surrounded by tons of trees, paragliding Pine Mt. will be an authentic woodsy experience. After paragliding Pine Mt., be sure to check out the Pine Observatory!

This is the only mountain situated in central Oregon. In case you don’t know, central Oregon consists ofthemostly desert and flat landscape. Not only the mountain is tall, but it has its own woodsy area, thanks to the trees. If you paraglide from this point, you will enjoy the authentic nature exploration and experience. You can also find Pine Observatory while you are at it.

Paragliding in Pine Ridge

Paragliding in Pine Ridge

Paragliding in Pine Ridge

Located in central Oregon, Pine Ridge is a one-mile long ridge compiled with various launching options. Thus, Pine Ridge will give you a truly unique Oregon paragliding experience. Easily accessible, every launch located in Pine Ridge can be located by walking. If you want a shorter flight, check out the north and northwest areas.

Before launching, make sure to check the weather. Since every launch is located below ridge top, winds tend to be strong.

It should be noted that part of the year the National Grasslands forbid driving off primary roads. So, make plans to walk.

The ridge is one mile long and it comes with different launching points. Because of these factors, you will experience a unique paragliding moment at this spot. Every launching spot is easily accessed – each of them can be reached on foot. The shorter flight is located on the northwest and north areas. Be aware of the winds, though, because the launching spots are all located under the ridge top. Always check the weather before launching. Be prepared to walk if the National Grassland doesn’t allow driving.

Paragliding in Woodrat Mountain

Paragliding in Woodrat Mountain

Paragliding in Woodrat Mountain

One of the most popular and raved about Oregon paragliding spots is Woodrat Mountain. Sitting at 3,780 feet Woodrat Mountain is located in southwestern Oregon. Launch off the large and wide opened gravel area. Expect to land near a cow pasture.

After landing, be sure to follow the following rules; no dogs, no smoking, no vehicles inside the gated area, no littering, and no alcohol.

It should also be noted that the Main LZ launch can be especially dangerous mid-season, due to the air which causes difficulty landing.

One of the most raved and also the best paragliding spots in Oregon isthe Woodrat Mountain, situated in the southwestern area of Oregon. The launch spot is the open and wide gravel area while the landing spot is usually not far from the cow pasture. After you land, follow the regulations which include no littering, no alcohol, no smoking, no vehicles (inside the gated zone), and no dogs.

Paragliding in Yaquina Head

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon: Yaquina Head

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon, 10 of the Unique Places for paraglide in Oregon: Yaquina Head

Our final Oregon paragliding area is located on the western shoreline of Oregon. Yaquina Head is home to a rocky launch area. Plan to land in a grassy area that is located in close proximity to the visitor center. If you do not want to land near the visitor center, you can stretch your flight to the east and land on the beach. Overall, Yaquina Head is the perfect place for coastal soaring in Oregon!
It should be advised that coastal winds can change abruptly. Ensure that you can detect changing weather conditions, and can make the right call of what to do. Also, you cannot fly near the lighthouse because seabirds nest in that area.

This area is situated on the shoreline western side of Oregon. The launch area is rocky but the landing spot is grassy – not far from the visitor center. However, if you don’t want to land there, you can fly to the eastern area and land on the beach. If you are looking for an ideal coastal soaring place, this one is the perfect pick! However, be advised that coastal winds can be super challenging and dangerous. Make plans to avoid flying close to the lighthouse and always make sure that the weather condition is safe for the launch.

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon

The Best Paragliding Spots in Oregon

As it was mentioned, Oregon has some of the most unique combinations of geographical elements, such as the mountains, the forest, and the shorelines. These combinations are unique and they will create a unique paragliding experience to feast your eyes. However, you should never let your guards down, especially when it comes to the weather hazards. The weather can be risky and dangerous so you should always be prepared and careful. If you prepare everything carefully and you have a backup plan, you will enjoy the best paragliding spots in Oregon.

10 Types of Trees in Oregon (With Pictures)

Pete Ortiz

Oregon is a beautiful state known for its natural beauty and outdoorsy lifestyle. Western Oregon features wet forests, plunging sea cliffs, and soaring mountain peaks. Eastern Oregon has large dry evergreen forests, shrubland, and frequent seasonal fires. Both unique environments produce some equally unique trees.

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Oregon has some of the largest trees in the world growing inside its borders. It also has some of the most unique trees in the world, like a maple with the biggest leaves of its kind. From trees that look like bushes to trees that grow over 250 tall, Oregon truly has it all.

trees & plants divider

The 10 types of trees you can find in Oregon

1. Oregon White Oak

eastern White Oak tree

Image Credit: TippyTortue, Shutterstock

Scientific name:Quercus garryana
Height:60 – 80 feet
Longevity:400+ years

The Oregon white oak is the only tree to bear the name of its native state. Oregon white oaks are found in dry areas of the state, often standing alone. Oregon white oaks can be found as far north as Canada and as far south as Southern California. These are extremely slow growing and long-lived trees. When thriving, Oregon white oaks can easily live to be 400 years old, with some examples reaching ages well in excess of 500 years.

Unfortunately, continuous development on the west coast has decreased the population of these old hardwoods. Homeowners don’t like to plant them because they take forever to grow, and many people will never see a white oak go from seedling to mature in their lifetime. Every white oak lost is hundreds of years of progress and growth that cannot be easily recovered.

2. Ponderosa Pine

ponderosa pine

Image Credit: Pixabay

Scientific name:Pinus ponderosa
Height:120 – 180 feet
Longevity:300+ years

The ponderosa pine is a common sight in eastern Oregon. These trees are fire resistant and grow in areas that receive seasonal light fires. Ponderosa pines are cultivated for their wood and can be easily identified by their needles which grow in clusters of three. The ponderosa pine has learned to adapt and thrive in areas where fire has removed much of the competition. When kept in their native habitat, ponderosa pines can live to be over 300 years old and reach heights of around 200 feet.

While most ponderosa pines live east of the Cascade Mountains, there is a species of ponderosa pine native to Oregon that lives west of the mountains. That cousin is known as the Willamette Valley ponderosa pine, and it has been classified as its own genetically distinct offshoot from the regular ponderosa pine.

3. Red Alder

Scientific name:Alnus rubra
Height:40 – 120 feet
Longevity:100 years

The red alder strikes a unique appearance. It has deep green leaves over a trunk consisting of light gray bark. It is a very pleasant natural color pallet. The bark can either be smooth or mottled, and the leaves have a serrated edge to them.

Red alders are a shorter variety of tree that likes to cling to low slopes on the western side of the mountains. Alders rarely grow over 100 feet and are more likely to be found at 60 feet heights than 120 feet. These trees thrive in wet environments where frequent rainfall nourishes their roots. Red alders prefer cool environments at higher elevations and do not like heat or dry climates.

4. Bigleaf Maple

big leaf maple

Image Credit: escalosobre, Pixabay

Scientific name:Acer macrophyllum
Height:40 – 80 feet
Longevity:200+ years

The bigleaf maple is so named for its unusually large leaves. This species of maple has the largest leaves out of any maple tree on Earth. The bigleaf maple is generally found in old hardwood forests growing in tandem with large oaks and evergreen trees. In the wild, these trees like to grow in moist areas alongside streams and rivers that run out of the mountains in western Oregon.

However, people also like to plant these native trees in their yards. They do not get too large, they live a long time, and they produce beautiful yellow flowers in the spring that attract pollinators. These characteristics make them ideal for planting, and they grow very easily in a variety of soils.

5. Vine Maple

vine maple tree up close

Image Credit: Pixabay

Scientific name:Acer circinatum
Height:20 – 30 feet
Longevity:90 years

The vine maple is a small stubby tree that is native to Oregon. It only grows about 25 feet tall in nature. It can often be mistaken for an overgrown shrub. Despite its small stature, this is a true maple in the same family as the bigleaf maple.

Vine maples can be identified by their serrated leaves. These trees produce a lot of color throughout the year. In the spring, they bloom with red and white blossoms and in the fall, they turn a beautiful shade of orange, red, and yellow. You can find these maples growing in the shade alongside some of its larger cousins in Oregon’s thick forests.

6. Pacific Dogwood

Pacific Dogwood_John Yunker_Shutterstock

Image Credit: John Yunker, Shutterstock

Scientific name:Cornus nuttallii
Height:40 – 60 feet
Longevity:150 years

The Pacific dogwood is a small tree prized for its ornamental properties. It does not grow very large and is relatively easy to cultivate. It produces small white flowers and large bracts that appear like huge blooms. In the fall, the dogwood spits tons of beautiful autumn colors. Pacific dogwoods also attract various species of woodpeckers and sapsuckers to their branches.

These trees are naturally found growing underneath many of the larger trees found in Oregon. For that reason, Pacific dogwoods should be kept in the shade, their trunks should be isolated from direct sunlight, and the leaves should be raked from around the base if you plan on keeping one of these trees in your yard. In optimal conditions, these trees can reach heights of 60 feet or more and live to be over 150 years old.

7. Sitka Spruce

Sitka Spruce Trees

Image Credit: Peter Turner Photography, Shutterstock

Scientific name:Picea sitchensis
Height:120 – 180 feet
Longevity:500+ years

Sitka spruce is the largest species of spruce and the third largest species of tree in the world. It is dwarfed only by the Douglas fir and the coastal redwood. A Sitka spruce once held the title of the largest tree in the United States. Sitka spruces can grow to nearly 200 feet tall and have diameters exceeding five feet wide.

They have been cherished for their majestic appearance and their commercial qualities as lumber. These giants grow in the foggy rainforests that cling to the coastlines of the Pacific Northwest. They are prevalent in the forests along Oregon’s coast but they are most heavily found in British Columbia and Alaska. Sitka is a town in Alaska, after which this giant tree is named after.

8. Douglas Fir

Douglas Fir trees

Image Credit: Jacquie Klose, Shutterstock

Scientific name:Pseudotsuga menziesii
Height:125 – 250 feet
Longevity:500+ years

Douglas firs are some of the oldest and largest trees found anywhere on Earth. Douglas firs can grow to absolutely massive heights that stretch well beyond 200 feet in the air. The thickest Douglas firs have trunks with diameters of eight feet or more. Some of the oldest Douglas firs are speculated to be close to 1000 years old. These trees suck up the sun and moisture found in western Oregon to grow to their titanic proportions.

In the wild, Douglas firs look like giant Christmas trees. Indeed, adolescent Douglas firs are sold across the United States for just this purpose around the holidays. Douglas fir also produces good lumber with pleasant white coloring and straight tight grain.

9. Western Red Cedar

cedar tree

Image Credit: Pixabay

Scientific name:Thuja plicata
Height:150 – 200 feet
Longevity:400+ years

Western red cedars are very popular trees known for many distinct qualities. Western red cedars smell amazing. Their foliage has a distinctive smell, and the lumber also carries a pleasing aroma when milled. The smell can linger for months or even years after the wood is cut. Western red cedars are huge trees that thrive in Oregon’s wet forests, and they grow alongside other trees such as Douglas fir.

In the wild, western red cedars can grow to nearly 200 feet and live for well over 400 years, making them one of the largest and oldest trees in Oregon. Western red cedars are fast growers which makes them excellent for the cultivation of lumber. Cedar wood is bug-resistant, rot-resistant, and has an amazing red color.

10. Western Hemlock

Western Hemlock_Abbie Warnock Matthews_Shutterstock

Image Credit: Abbie Warnock Matthews, Shutterstock

Scientific name:Tsuga heterophylla
Height:125 – 150 feet
Longevity:400+ years

Western hemlocks are a distinct species from their eastern counterparts, Tsuga canadensis, which thrive in cool wet environments. Western hemlocks thrive in areas that receive 60 inches of rain or more per year. This tree can be found hugging the coast, west of the Cascades, going from northern California all the way up to southern Alaska. They are rarely ever found east of the Cascades and cannot grow in dry conditions.

When thriving, these trees can grow very large and live for hundreds of years. You can spot western hemlocks by their droopy hanging branch tips. Western hemlocks were ignored as commercial trees for many years because people assumed their wood would be of poor quality like that of their eastern cousin.

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Conclusion

These are ten of the most common and native trees that you can find in Oregon. Many of the largest trees grow in the wet coastal areas that trap the water coming off the Pacific against the sides of the Cascade mountains. A few of the trees like to live in solitary existences in Oregon’s dry, fire-prone, east. Each of these trees has its own history, story, and appearance. Next time you are plying the Pacific coast, keep your eyes peeled, and you will likely spot one of these common trees on your journey.

Source https://topadventuresports.com/top-10-places-in-oregon-to-paraglide/

Source https://topadventuresports.com/top-10-places-in-oregon-to-paraglide/

Source https://housegrail.com/types-of-trees-in-oregon/

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