The 10 Best Exercises for Hiking That You Need To Know

Amber Sayer

While hiking is often thought of as simply a walk in the woods, it can actually be quite a vigorous workout and athletic endeavor depending on the intensity, duration, and terrain of the hike, and the weight of your pack. If you find yourself getting winded while hiking or your legs are super sore the next day, consider doing some exercises to strengthen your legs and core to help when you’re on the trail. Strengthening your body off the trail will translate to improved hiking endurance, power, and protection against acute and overuse injuries. For example, improving your balance and building up the stabilizing muscles in your lower legs can help guard your ankles from sudden twists or sprains, while developing the quadriceps can make long, steep descents nothing more than an opportunity to enjoy the scenery rather than an exhausting trek that leaves your legs feeling like Jello.

Some of these exercises can be done at home without equipment, though having access to a gym or basic workout gear will help. Spending some time in the gym or doing strength training at home to prepare for hiking is also an opportunity to address any muscle imbalances, build core strength, and develop your athletic foundation. The goals of your hiking strength training program should be to increase your strength in the primary muscles involved in hiking (primarily the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, calves, and core), improve your muscular endurance to delay fatigue, develop your balance, and maintain or improve your cardiovascular fitness.

With these goals in mind, we’ve put together the 10 best strength training exercises to prepare for hiking.

goblet squats

Gradyreese/Getty Images

Goblet Squats

Goblet squats primarily target the quads and glutes, but they activate your hamstrings and adductors as well, making them an excellent exercise for hikers. As you get stronger, increase the weight you use or perform the squat atop a BOSU ball to add a challenge to your core and balance.

Equipment Needed: A heavy kettlebell or dumbbell. Optional: BOSU ball.

Step 1: Stand with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, with your toes pointing about forward or about 5-10 degrees outward. Your hips should also be externally rotated.

Step 2: Hold a kettlebell or dumbbell up at chest height.

Step 3: Inhale, pushing your hips backward as if reaching your butt back to sit in a chair. Make sure your core is engaged, your chest is up, and your back is straight.

Step 4: Exhale, pressing through your heels to return to the starting position.

Step 5: Repeat 10-15 reps per set.

how to do crunches man doing sit ups in urban setting

Weighted Step-Ups

You would be hard-pressed to find a more functional hiking exercise than weighted step-ups. Step-ups are a multi-joint, compound exercise that works all the major muscles of the lower body while simultaneously providing a cardiovascular challenge. A weighted vest, your actual hiking pack, or dumbbells can be used here.

Equipment Needed: Tall box or step, weighted vest or pack.

Step 1: Stand facing a bench, plyometric box, or step that is roughly knee height or slightly shorter. Relax your arms at your side.

Step 2: Engage your core and glutes while you step up onto the box with your right foot. Use your arms to drive your body upward.

Step 3: Bring your left leg up onto the box as well so that you are standing on top of the box.

Step 4: Step back down with your right foot first, then left.

Step 5: Continue leading with the right foot for 12 reps, and then switch sides.

Single-Leg Romanian Deadlifts

Single-leg Romanian deadlifts provide all the excellent posterior chain recruitment benefits of standard deadlifts, while being more functional for hiking since they improve your single-leg stability. Hiking requires excellent single-leg balance, so the single-leg Romanian deadlift will strengthen the glutes, hamstrings, and stabilizing muscles critical for injury prevention on the trail. It can be a tricky move to master, especially if you tend to struggle with balance and coordination, but it should translate to safer hikes and more confidence on uneven terrain. As you get stronger, you can even stand on a cushion or BOSU to further increase the difficulty and core muscle recruitment.

Equipment Needed: A heavy dumbbell or kettlebell. Optional: BOSU

Step 1: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, knees slightly bent, chest up and proud, arms at your side, and a dumbbell in your right hand.

Step 2: Bring your left arm out to your side for balance and engage your core.

Step 3: Bend your left knee (the one on your standing/support leg) about 20 degrees to activate your hamstrings and glutes while you lift your right leg off the ground.

Step 4: Contract your glutes and hinge from your hips to bring your torso toward the floor, keeping your gaze on the floor to prevent hyperextending your neck. Your right leg should extend behind you as a counterbalance.

Step 5: Reach the dumbbell in your right hand down toward your left foot until you feel enough of a stretch in the hamstring of your supporting leg.

Step 6: Engage your core and glutes to come back up, extending your hips until they are fully locked out. If you need to regain your balance, you can touch your right foot back down to the floor; otherwise, keep it lifted and move into your next rep.

Step 7: Complete 10 reps per side per set.

A shirtless man doing split squats using a dumbbell.

Young shirtless man doing split squats with weights

Bulgarian Split Squat

Much like hiking, the Bulgarian split squat is a unilateral exercise, which means it requires coordination and balance while also placing a greater demand on your muscles. Split squats are great for strengthening your lower body, core, and spinal extensor muscles, and this variation, which elevates your rear foot, increases the activation of your hamstrings, quads, and hips, which translates closely to hiking .

Equipment Needed: Weight bench or box, heavy dumbbell, or kettlebell.

Step 1: Stand about three feet in front of a bench, facing away, with the top of your rear foot up on the bench behind you.

Step 2: Your legs should be shoulder-width apart. Your front foot should be far enough forward that when you drop into a lunge, your front knee does not extend beyond your toes.

Step 3: You can load this squat by holding dumbbells in each hand with your arms extended down at your sides.

Step 4: Keeping your shoulders back and core engaged, bend your front knee to drop into a split squat/lunge.

Step 5: When the thigh of your front leg is parallel to the ground, press through your heel to return to the standing position.

Step 6: Complete 8-10 reps per leg per set.

Woman doing hamstring curls with a stability ball.

Stability Ball Hamstring Curls

The hamstrings are key players in all the uphill sections of your hike. This exercise also engages your abs, glutes, and hip flexors, which work synergistically to coordinate your stride and maintain your balance on the trail. This is a great exercise to build muscular endurance; you can easily bang out many reps and keep your hamstrings firing.

Equipment Needed: Large stability ball.

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Step 1: Lie on your back with your legs straight and your heels up on a stability ball. Place your arms at your sides with your palms down on the mat.

Step 2: Engage your abs and glutes to lift your hips up so that your body is in a straight line from your heels to your head. Your shoulder blades should be down on your mat.

Step 3: Engage your hamstrings and press your heels into the ball.

Step 4: Bend your knees to bring the ball toward your butt.

Step 5: Return to the starting position.

Step 6: Complete 30 reps per set.

Man performing a jump squat

Kenta Seki

Jump Squats

Jump squats strengthen all the primary leg muscles involved in hiking, such as the glutes, quads, and hamstrings. Plus, they’ll give you a cardio boost that will make feeling breathless after steep uphill climbs a thing of the past.

Equipment Needed: None.

Step 1: Begin in a standing position with your feet shoulder-width apart.

Step 2: Lower your body into a squat by bending your knees and sitting your hips all the way back, as if reaching your butt back to sit in a chair. Engage your core, maintain a straight back, and keep your chest up and proud.

Step 3: Jump up vertically as high into the air as high as you can, reaching up towards the ceiling.

Step 4: As soon as you land, bend your knees to cushion the landing, transitioning immediately into a full squat to begin again.

Step 5: Jump as high and fast as you can for 60 seconds.

Step 6: Rest 30 seconds and then repeat for three sets.

Single-Leg Pallof Press

The Pallof Press is an anti-rotational exercise that works your obliques, shoulders, and abs. By standing on one leg, you’ll also work on your balance while you strengthen the muscles stabilizing the ankle. Keep your core tight and engage your glutes to prevent your body from twisting or falling. You can adjust the difficulty of the move with the width and thickness of the resistance band you choose — for an easier level, choose a thinner band, and for a more advanced progression, choose a wider and thicker band.

Equipment Needed: Anchored resistance band with a handle.

Step 1: Attach a resistance band with a handle to a pole or stationary object at chest height.

Step 2: Your starting position should be far enough away from the anchor point that there’s decent tension on the band.

Step 3: Stand on one leg and hold the handle of the band in toward your chest.

Step 4: Bracing your core and squeezing your glutes, straight your arms by pushing them out away from your chest against the tension of the band.

Step 5: Hold the extended position for a full breath and then return your arms to your chest.

Step 6: Complete 15 reps and then switch sides and legs.

Single-Leg Calf Raises

The calves are predominantly involved in uphill hiking and can easily fatigue if not sufficiently trained. Fortunately, they are easy to target with this move.

Equipment Needed: A step, curb, or box to stand on. Optional dumbbell.

Step 1: Stand on one leg on a step or box with your heels hanging off the back. Hook your other foot behind the ankle of the supporting leg.

Step 2: Hold a dumbbell in the opposite arm.

Step 3: Drop your heel down so that you’re sinking down into the heel and then raise up onto your toe so that you’re on your tiptoes.

Step 4:

Speed Skaters

Many hikers complain about sore knees after a long day on the trail, which is often caused by weak hips. When the hips are weak, your knees collapse inward, putting undue stress on the ligaments and cartilage of the knee. By strengthening your hips, adductors, and abductors through lateral training you’ll not only reduce your risk of injury, but improve your agility, coordination, and stability up and down uneven terrain. You’ll also get your heart pumping during this intense exercise. A portable slide board, such as the Brrrn Board is ideal for this exercise, or you can use socked feet on a smooth floor.

Equipment Needed: Lateral training slide board such as the Brrrn Board or smooth floor

Step 1: Start at the right side of your Brrrn Board or slide board with a slight bend in your knees and hips and core engaged.

Step 2: Slide your left foot across the slide board to the left as you press your right foot against the right bumper of the board.

Step 3: When your left foot is about to touch the left bumper, lift your right foot off the slide board.

Step 4: Skate back and forth as fast as you can for 3-5 minutes.

Step 5: As you get more advanced, you can lean forward like a speed skater and reach across your body with your opposite hand to touch down at each bumper.

Heel Touches

One of the common ways hikers stumble and fall is when they lower their body off a boulder or elevated log. Stepping down under control can be very difficult, especially on tired legs or with a heavy pack, so this exercise works your glutes and quads to facilitate this motion.

Equipment Needed: Stair, box, or curb about 8 inches off the ground and an optional dumbbell.

Step 1: Stand on a step or curb facing the stair or ground below it.

Step 2: Lift your left foot off the stair so it’s just hovering right about the stair with the toes pointing toward the ceiling.

Step 3: Bend your right knee as if you’re going to step down onto your leg foot, but just hover the heel over the ground or stair below without touching it.

Step 4: Power yourself back up with the right leg.

Step 5: Complete 12 reps per side, moving in a slow and controlled fashion.

The 10 Best Exercises for Hiking That You Need To Know

Amber Sayer

While hiking is often thought of as simply a walk in the woods, it can actually be quite a vigorous workout and athletic endeavor depending on the intensity, duration, and terrain of the hike, and the weight of your pack. If you find yourself getting winded while hiking or your legs are super sore the next day, consider doing some exercises to strengthen your legs and core to help when you’re on the trail. Strengthening your body off the trail will translate to improved hiking endurance, power, and protection against acute and overuse injuries. For example, improving your balance and building up the stabilizing muscles in your lower legs can help guard your ankles from sudden twists or sprains, while developing the quadriceps can make long, steep descents nothing more than an opportunity to enjoy the scenery rather than an exhausting trek that leaves your legs feeling like Jello.

Some of these exercises can be done at home without equipment, though having access to a gym or basic workout gear will help. Spending some time in the gym or doing strength training at home to prepare for hiking is also an opportunity to address any muscle imbalances, build core strength, and develop your athletic foundation. The goals of your hiking strength training program should be to increase your strength in the primary muscles involved in hiking (primarily the quadriceps, hamstrings, glutes, calves, and core), improve your muscular endurance to delay fatigue, develop your balance, and maintain or improve your cardiovascular fitness.

With these goals in mind, we’ve put together the 10 best strength training exercises to prepare for hiking.

goblet squats

Gradyreese/Getty Images

Goblet Squats

Goblet squats primarily target the quads and glutes, but they activate your hamstrings and adductors as well, making them an excellent exercise for hikers. As you get stronger, increase the weight you use or perform the squat atop a BOSU ball to add a challenge to your core and balance.

Equipment Needed: A heavy kettlebell or dumbbell. Optional: BOSU ball.

Step 1: Stand with your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart, with your toes pointing about forward or about 5-10 degrees outward. Your hips should also be externally rotated.

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Step 2: Hold a kettlebell or dumbbell up at chest height.

Step 3: Inhale, pushing your hips backward as if reaching your butt back to sit in a chair. Make sure your core is engaged, your chest is up, and your back is straight.

Step 4: Exhale, pressing through your heels to return to the starting position.

Step 5: Repeat 10-15 reps per set.

how to do crunches man doing sit ups in urban setting

Weighted Step-Ups

You would be hard-pressed to find a more functional hiking exercise than weighted step-ups. Step-ups are a multi-joint, compound exercise that works all the major muscles of the lower body while simultaneously providing a cardiovascular challenge. A weighted vest, your actual hiking pack, or dumbbells can be used here.

Equipment Needed: Tall box or step, weighted vest or pack.

Step 1: Stand facing a bench, plyometric box, or step that is roughly knee height or slightly shorter. Relax your arms at your side.

Step 2: Engage your core and glutes while you step up onto the box with your right foot. Use your arms to drive your body upward.

Step 3: Bring your left leg up onto the box as well so that you are standing on top of the box.

Step 4: Step back down with your right foot first, then left.

Step 5: Continue leading with the right foot for 12 reps, and then switch sides.

Single-Leg Romanian Deadlifts

Single-leg Romanian deadlifts provide all the excellent posterior chain recruitment benefits of standard deadlifts, while being more functional for hiking since they improve your single-leg stability. Hiking requires excellent single-leg balance, so the single-leg Romanian deadlift will strengthen the glutes, hamstrings, and stabilizing muscles critical for injury prevention on the trail. It can be a tricky move to master, especially if you tend to struggle with balance and coordination, but it should translate to safer hikes and more confidence on uneven terrain. As you get stronger, you can even stand on a cushion or BOSU to further increase the difficulty and core muscle recruitment.

Equipment Needed: A heavy dumbbell or kettlebell. Optional: BOSU

Step 1: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, knees slightly bent, chest up and proud, arms at your side, and a dumbbell in your right hand.

Step 2: Bring your left arm out to your side for balance and engage your core.

Step 3: Bend your left knee (the one on your standing/support leg) about 20 degrees to activate your hamstrings and glutes while you lift your right leg off the ground.

Step 4: Contract your glutes and hinge from your hips to bring your torso toward the floor, keeping your gaze on the floor to prevent hyperextending your neck. Your right leg should extend behind you as a counterbalance.

Step 5: Reach the dumbbell in your right hand down toward your left foot until you feel enough of a stretch in the hamstring of your supporting leg.

Step 6: Engage your core and glutes to come back up, extending your hips until they are fully locked out. If you need to regain your balance, you can touch your right foot back down to the floor; otherwise, keep it lifted and move into your next rep.

Step 7: Complete 10 reps per side per set.

A shirtless man doing split squats using a dumbbell.

Young shirtless man doing split squats with weights

Bulgarian Split Squat

Much like hiking, the Bulgarian split squat is a unilateral exercise, which means it requires coordination and balance while also placing a greater demand on your muscles. Split squats are great for strengthening your lower body, core, and spinal extensor muscles, and this variation, which elevates your rear foot, increases the activation of your hamstrings, quads, and hips, which translates closely to hiking .

Equipment Needed: Weight bench or box, heavy dumbbell, or kettlebell.

Step 1: Stand about three feet in front of a bench, facing away, with the top of your rear foot up on the bench behind you.

Step 2: Your legs should be shoulder-width apart. Your front foot should be far enough forward that when you drop into a lunge, your front knee does not extend beyond your toes.

Step 3: You can load this squat by holding dumbbells in each hand with your arms extended down at your sides.

Step 4: Keeping your shoulders back and core engaged, bend your front knee to drop into a split squat/lunge.

Step 5: When the thigh of your front leg is parallel to the ground, press through your heel to return to the standing position.

Step 6: Complete 8-10 reps per leg per set.

Woman doing hamstring curls with a stability ball.

Stability Ball Hamstring Curls

The hamstrings are key players in all the uphill sections of your hike. This exercise also engages your abs, glutes, and hip flexors, which work synergistically to coordinate your stride and maintain your balance on the trail. This is a great exercise to build muscular endurance; you can easily bang out many reps and keep your hamstrings firing.

Equipment Needed: Large stability ball.

Step 1: Lie on your back with your legs straight and your heels up on a stability ball. Place your arms at your sides with your palms down on the mat.

Step 2: Engage your abs and glutes to lift your hips up so that your body is in a straight line from your heels to your head. Your shoulder blades should be down on your mat.

Step 3: Engage your hamstrings and press your heels into the ball.

Step 4: Bend your knees to bring the ball toward your butt.

Step 5: Return to the starting position.

Step 6: Complete 30 reps per set.

Man performing a jump squat

Kenta Seki

Jump Squats

Jump squats strengthen all the primary leg muscles involved in hiking, such as the glutes, quads, and hamstrings. Plus, they’ll give you a cardio boost that will make feeling breathless after steep uphill climbs a thing of the past.

Equipment Needed: None.

Step 1: Begin in a standing position with your feet shoulder-width apart.

Step 2: Lower your body into a squat by bending your knees and sitting your hips all the way back, as if reaching your butt back to sit in a chair. Engage your core, maintain a straight back, and keep your chest up and proud.

Step 3: Jump up vertically as high into the air as high as you can, reaching up towards the ceiling.

Step 4: As soon as you land, bend your knees to cushion the landing, transitioning immediately into a full squat to begin again.

Step 5: Jump as high and fast as you can for 60 seconds.

Step 6: Rest 30 seconds and then repeat for three sets.

Single-Leg Pallof Press

The Pallof Press is an anti-rotational exercise that works your obliques, shoulders, and abs. By standing on one leg, you’ll also work on your balance while you strengthen the muscles stabilizing the ankle. Keep your core tight and engage your glutes to prevent your body from twisting or falling. You can adjust the difficulty of the move with the width and thickness of the resistance band you choose — for an easier level, choose a thinner band, and for a more advanced progression, choose a wider and thicker band.

Equipment Needed: Anchored resistance band with a handle.

Step 1: Attach a resistance band with a handle to a pole or stationary object at chest height.

Step 2: Your starting position should be far enough away from the anchor point that there’s decent tension on the band.

Step 3: Stand on one leg and hold the handle of the band in toward your chest.

Step 4: Bracing your core and squeezing your glutes, straight your arms by pushing them out away from your chest against the tension of the band.

Step 5: Hold the extended position for a full breath and then return your arms to your chest.

Step 6: Complete 15 reps and then switch sides and legs.

Single-Leg Calf Raises

The calves are predominantly involved in uphill hiking and can easily fatigue if not sufficiently trained. Fortunately, they are easy to target with this move.

Equipment Needed: A step, curb, or box to stand on. Optional dumbbell.

Read Post  How To Protect Toes When Hiking Downhill – 16 Easy Tips

Step 1: Stand on one leg on a step or box with your heels hanging off the back. Hook your other foot behind the ankle of the supporting leg.

Step 2: Hold a dumbbell in the opposite arm.

Step 3: Drop your heel down so that you’re sinking down into the heel and then raise up onto your toe so that you’re on your tiptoes.

Step 4:

Speed Skaters

Many hikers complain about sore knees after a long day on the trail, which is often caused by weak hips. When the hips are weak, your knees collapse inward, putting undue stress on the ligaments and cartilage of the knee. By strengthening your hips, adductors, and abductors through lateral training you’ll not only reduce your risk of injury, but improve your agility, coordination, and stability up and down uneven terrain. You’ll also get your heart pumping during this intense exercise. A portable slide board, such as the Brrrn Board is ideal for this exercise, or you can use socked feet on a smooth floor.

Equipment Needed: Lateral training slide board such as the Brrrn Board or smooth floor

Step 1: Start at the right side of your Brrrn Board or slide board with a slight bend in your knees and hips and core engaged.

Step 2: Slide your left foot across the slide board to the left as you press your right foot against the right bumper of the board.

Step 3: When your left foot is about to touch the left bumper, lift your right foot off the slide board.

Step 4: Skate back and forth as fast as you can for 3-5 minutes.

Step 5: As you get more advanced, you can lean forward like a speed skater and reach across your body with your opposite hand to touch down at each bumper.

Heel Touches

One of the common ways hikers stumble and fall is when they lower their body off a boulder or elevated log. Stepping down under control can be very difficult, especially on tired legs or with a heavy pack, so this exercise works your glutes and quads to facilitate this motion.

Equipment Needed: Stair, box, or curb about 8 inches off the ground and an optional dumbbell.

Step 1: Stand on a step or curb facing the stair or ground below it.

Step 2: Lift your left foot off the stair so it’s just hovering right about the stair with the toes pointing toward the ceiling.

Step 3: Bend your right knee as if you’re going to step down onto your leg foot, but just hover the heel over the ground or stair below without touching it.

Step 4: Power yourself back up with the right leg.

Step 5: Complete 12 reps per side, moving in a slow and controlled fashion.

Can You Use Ski Pole for Hiking? (Instead Of Trekking Pole?)

Ski poles are great for skiing, but can you use them for hiking? In this blog post, we will take a look at the pros and cons of using ski poles for hiking. We will also discuss when it is appropriate to use trekking poles instead. Let’s get started!

Table of Contents

So, Can You Use Ski Poles For Hiking?

The short answer is yes, you can use ski poles for hiking. However, there are some benefits and disadvantages to consider before making a decision.

Let’s take a look at some of the pros and cons of using ski poles vs trekking poles for hiking:

About Ski Poles

About Ski Poles

Ski poles are designed to withstand cold and wet weather, and they usually have wider baskets that help keep them stable in deep snow. They’re also adjustable, so you can customize the length to fit your height and needs.

However, ski poles are not as lightweight as trekking poles, and they can be more expensive. If you’re looking for a budget-friendly option, or if you don’t plan to hike in cold weather conditions, trekking poles might be a better choice.

  • Fixed Pole (One Piece Pole)
  • 2 Section Poles

Fixed Pole (One Piece Pole)

Fixed Pole (One Piece Pole) ski poles do not have any sections that can be adjusted. This type of pole is typically less expensive, but it also tends to be heavier and less durable than two-section poles.

These are only good for downhill skiing and you shouldn’t use these for backcountry skiing or climbing.

2 Section Poles (Two-Piece Pole)

Two-section poles are the most common type of ski pole. They’re made up of two pieces that can be easily connected and disconnected, which makes them adjustable to fit different heights.

This type of pole is typically more durable than fixed poles, and it’s also lighter and less expensive. However, they can be more prone to breaking if they’re not handled with care.

Pros Of Using Ski Poles For Hiking

  • Ski poles are generally less expensive than trekking poles. (Not always though)
  • Ski poles are heavier than trekking poles.
  • Ski poles are much better for skiing as they are specifically designed for skiing.

About Trekking Poles

About Trekking Poles

Trekking poles are the most popular type of hiking pole. They’re lightweight and adjustable, and they come in a variety of prices and materials. Trekking poles are perfect for all types of hikers, from beginners to experts.

Trekking poles are considered 3 section poles, they offer the most adjustment and customizability. Normal ski poles don’t offer the ability to adjust the length to the degree that a trekking pole would provide especially since you going uphill.

They are also super portable and easy to break down/assemble.

trekking poles also have a shock-absorbing feature that can help reduce stress on your knees and ankles when hiking downhill.

Pros of Using Trekking Poles For Hiking

  • Trekking poles are more versatile for hiking terrain than ski poles and can be used in a wider variety of situations.
  • Specifically designed for hiking
  • Way more portable
  • Much better for hiking, camping, and backpacking

What Trekking Poles Should You Get?

  • Choose a pole that is lightweight and adjustable. The pole should fit comfortably in your hand and be easy to adjust to different heights.
  • Choose a pole that is made from durable materials. The pole should be able to withstand wear and tear, and it should also be weather-resistant.
  • Choose a pole that has a shock-absorbing system. This will help reduce stress on your knees and ankles when hiking downhill.

Here at Outside Origin, we personally recommend Montem Ultra Strong Trekking Poles. You can check out the review we did here.

Conclusion: Can You Use Ski Pole For Hiking?

So, can you use ski poles for hiking?

It depends on the situation. Ski poles are specifically designed for skiing and may not be as durable or lightweight as trekking poles. However, they are less expensive than trekking poles and maybe a good option if you’re looking for an affordable option.

Trekking poles are the most popular type of hiking pole and are perfect for all types of hikers. They’re lightweight, adjustable, and come in a variety of prices and materials.

If you’re looking for the best option for hiking, trekking poles are your best bet!

Can You Do Me A Small Favor?

I have put a lot of time & effort into writing this post to provide you with the best info out there.
It’ll help me out if you could consider sharing it on your social media networks. You are also allowed to take any photo you want from my blog as long as you credit and link back!

Appreciate it! ❤️️

Hey, I am the founder of Outside Origin! I love hiking in my spare time and have gone to various different hikes. You can check out our about us section to learn more about what our team and I do over at Outside Origin.

Source https://www.themanual.com/fitness/best-exercises-for-hiking/

Source https://www.themanual.com/fitness/best-exercises-for-hiking/

Source https://outsideorigin.com/can-you-use-ski-pole-for-hiking/

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