Rattlesnakes

Leave it alone. Most bites occur when individuals or dogs provoke the rattlesnake or if you try to capture or kill it. Rattlesnakes only bite or attack in self-defense, so the best way to avoid being bitten is to leave the rattlesnake alone.

In 1988 two doctors at the University of Southern California Medical Center analyzed 227 cases of venomous snakebite, covering more than a decade, and found that 44 percent occurred during accidental contact, such as stepping on the animal. More than 55 percent, however, resulted from the victim’s grabbing or handling the creatures, and in 28 percent of these cases, the victims were intoxicated. The doctors’ conclusion was that the typical snakebite victim is male and under thirty, with a blood-alcohol concentration of more than 0.1 percent at the time he is bitten. Yet only 0.2 percent of all snakebite victims die each year, and most of them receive no medical treatment or first aid. (Steve Grenard, Aug. ’00)

Many people spend a lifetime hunting, fishing or otherwise enjoying the outdoors and never see a rattlesnake. Very few people are actually bitten by rattlesnakes, yet because the bite is extremely painful and can be fatal, you should always keep alert and watch where you step or put your hands when you are in the field. Be careful after dark as well, for on warm nights rattlesnakes are out and about searching for food.

Most rattlesnakes, when disturbed, normally try to withdraw, but if they think they are cornered, the explosive sizzling buzz of their rattle is an unmistakable warning to retreat and is a sound that will long be remembered.

If you need help with a venomous bite or if you have a poisoning emergency, call your Poison Center immediately. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call 911. Poison Centers across the country now have a new national emergency phone number – 1-800-222-1222

Tips To Avoid Rattlesnakes

  • Be sure to walk or hike in areas where you can see the path and where you step or reach with your hands.
  • Use a walking stick or other device to rustle the shrubs along the side of route to alert snakes of your presence.
  • Wear high boots or hiking boots, long pants and gloves (when using your hands to move rocks or brush).
  • Don’t put your hands or feet in areas where you cannot see such as on a ledge, in a crevice and use caution when you pick up rocks or debris where a rattlesnake may be hiding.


Tips to Protect Your Dog or Small Pet from Rattlesnake Bites

One of the most common fears of pet owners is that their dog or cat will be bitten by a rattlesnake.

Rattlesnake avoidance classes designed to train your dog to fear and avoid rattlesnakes is one way to approach the situation. There is also a pet rattlesnake vaccine, but there is some controversy over how effective it really is. Talk to your Vet about the pros and cons of vaccinating your dog or cat with the rattlesnake vaccine.

Here are some additional tips on how to protect your pets from rattlesnakes.

  • Always keep your dog or pet on a leash when outside of your home or away from your yard.
  • Don’t let your dog wander into tall grass or thick shrubs where rattlesnakes may be hiding.
  • Be careful along streams and riverbeds as snakes are often found in the tall grass near water sources.
  • If you encounter a rattlesnake stay a minimum of 10′ or more away from the snake and walk around the area or take another route.
  • Always have a nearby 24/7 Vet Hospital phone number and address with you when you venture out to hike with your dog and keep emergency numbers in an easy to find location at home.
  • Enroll your dog in a Rattlesnake Avoidance Class from a local dog trainer who has experience training dogs to avoid rattlesnakes.
  • Ask your vet if he or she feels a rattlesnake vaccine is appropriate for your dog.
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Tips to Keep Rattlesnakes Out of Your Yard

A rattlesnake proof fence is one of the best ways to keep snakes out of your yard. It may be expensive, but worth the investment once you realize how expensive a visit to the emergency vet clinic will be.

A snake-proof fence should be a minimum of 3′ tall with the bottom portion of the fence buried at least 3″ or more. Gates should have no gaps on the sides and be flush with the ground. Concrete slabs placed under the gate are even better. For your fencing material, use mesh that is not more than 1/4″ in diameter or a solid material that is smooth. Snakes cannot climb smooth surfaces.

Here are some additional tips on how to snake proof your yard.

  • Keep the grass in your front and back yards cut short.
  • Clean up any debris in your yard including piles of wood, leaves, or any other materials that a snake could hide under.
  • Control rodents in your yard and around your home: pick up fruit on the ground, keep trash cans closed with lids and don’t leave pet food out.
  • Remove birdfeeders as they attract small rodents which rattlesnakes prey on.
  • Add a rattlesnake proof fence around your yard
  • Keep any vegetation from growing up or over the fence as snakes can use it as a way over the fence.
  • Check under your house and around the perimeter to close any gaps or holes where a rattlesnake could hide.
  • Fill in or block any holes or gaps were a snake can hide or slip through the fence or under your house.

Links

Health and Medical Disclaimer

The information provided on this web site and by this web site through content provided by Authors or third party providers, and in other sources to which it refers, is PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY and should not be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease.

Information provided at and by DesertUSA is NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL CARE. If you have a medical concern, or suspect you have a health problem you should consult your primary doctor or specialist.

If you cannot agree to this Health and Medical Disclaimer, you are not permitted to use this web site and should exit immediately.

Rattlesnakes

Leave it alone. Most bites occur when individuals or dogs provoke the rattlesnake or if you try to capture or kill it. Rattlesnakes only bite or attack in self-defense, so the best way to avoid being bitten is to leave the rattlesnake alone.

In 1988 two doctors at the University of Southern California Medical Center analyzed 227 cases of venomous snakebite, covering more than a decade, and found that 44 percent occurred during accidental contact, such as stepping on the animal. More than 55 percent, however, resulted from the victim’s grabbing or handling the creatures, and in 28 percent of these cases, the victims were intoxicated. The doctors’ conclusion was that the typical snakebite victim is male and under thirty, with a blood-alcohol concentration of more than 0.1 percent at the time he is bitten. Yet only 0.2 percent of all snakebite victims die each year, and most of them receive no medical treatment or first aid. (Steve Grenard, Aug. ’00)

Many people spend a lifetime hunting, fishing or otherwise enjoying the outdoors and never see a rattlesnake. Very few people are actually bitten by rattlesnakes, yet because the bite is extremely painful and can be fatal, you should always keep alert and watch where you step or put your hands when you are in the field. Be careful after dark as well, for on warm nights rattlesnakes are out and about searching for food.

Most rattlesnakes, when disturbed, normally try to withdraw, but if they think they are cornered, the explosive sizzling buzz of their rattle is an unmistakable warning to retreat and is a sound that will long be remembered.

If you need help with a venomous bite or if you have a poisoning emergency, call your Poison Center immediately. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call 911. Poison Centers across the country now have a new national emergency phone number – 1-800-222-1222

Tips To Avoid Rattlesnakes

  • Be sure to walk or hike in areas where you can see the path and where you step or reach with your hands.
  • Use a walking stick or other device to rustle the shrubs along the side of route to alert snakes of your presence.
  • Wear high boots or hiking boots, long pants and gloves (when using your hands to move rocks or brush).
  • Don’t put your hands or feet in areas where you cannot see such as on a ledge, in a crevice and use caution when you pick up rocks or debris where a rattlesnake may be hiding.
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Tips to Protect Your Dog or Small Pet from Rattlesnake Bites

One of the most common fears of pet owners is that their dog or cat will be bitten by a rattlesnake.

Rattlesnake avoidance classes designed to train your dog to fear and avoid rattlesnakes is one way to approach the situation. There is also a pet rattlesnake vaccine, but there is some controversy over how effective it really is. Talk to your Vet about the pros and cons of vaccinating your dog or cat with the rattlesnake vaccine.

Here are some additional tips on how to protect your pets from rattlesnakes.

  • Always keep your dog or pet on a leash when outside of your home or away from your yard.
  • Don’t let your dog wander into tall grass or thick shrubs where rattlesnakes may be hiding.
  • Be careful along streams and riverbeds as snakes are often found in the tall grass near water sources.
  • If you encounter a rattlesnake stay a minimum of 10′ or more away from the snake and walk around the area or take another route.
  • Always have a nearby 24/7 Vet Hospital phone number and address with you when you venture out to hike with your dog and keep emergency numbers in an easy to find location at home.
  • Enroll your dog in a Rattlesnake Avoidance Class from a local dog trainer who has experience training dogs to avoid rattlesnakes.
  • Ask your vet if he or she feels a rattlesnake vaccine is appropriate for your dog.


Tips to Keep Rattlesnakes Out of Your Yard

A rattlesnake proof fence is one of the best ways to keep snakes out of your yard. It may be expensive, but worth the investment once you realize how expensive a visit to the emergency vet clinic will be.

A snake-proof fence should be a minimum of 3′ tall with the bottom portion of the fence buried at least 3″ or more. Gates should have no gaps on the sides and be flush with the ground. Concrete slabs placed under the gate are even better. For your fencing material, use mesh that is not more than 1/4″ in diameter or a solid material that is smooth. Snakes cannot climb smooth surfaces.

Here are some additional tips on how to snake proof your yard.

  • Keep the grass in your front and back yards cut short.
  • Clean up any debris in your yard including piles of wood, leaves, or any other materials that a snake could hide under.
  • Control rodents in your yard and around your home: pick up fruit on the ground, keep trash cans closed with lids and don’t leave pet food out.
  • Remove birdfeeders as they attract small rodents which rattlesnakes prey on.
  • Add a rattlesnake proof fence around your yard
  • Keep any vegetation from growing up or over the fence as snakes can use it as a way over the fence.
  • Check under your house and around the perimeter to close any gaps or holes where a rattlesnake could hide.
  • Fill in or block any holes or gaps were a snake can hide or slip through the fence or under your house.

Links

Health and Medical Disclaimer

The information provided on this web site and by this web site through content provided by Authors or third party providers, and in other sources to which it refers, is PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY and should not be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease.

Information provided at and by DesertUSA is NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL CARE. If you have a medical concern, or suspect you have a health problem you should consult your primary doctor or specialist.

If you cannot agree to this Health and Medical Disclaimer, you are not permitted to use this web site and should exit immediately.

How To Avoid Rattlesnakes While Hiking

How To Avoid Rattlesnakes While Hiking

Finding a rattlesnake while hiking or camping in one of the terrifying experiences a traveler can have. In spite of their venomous nature, is it feasible to escape rattlesnakes when trekking or camping?

There’s good news: the answer to that question is “yes,” and it’s a lot simpler than you would imagine.

Table of Contents

The Best Ways To Avoid Rattlesnakes While Hiking

In order to keep you safe when hiking, we have come up with some really unique ideas. Let’s discover the best possible ways for avoiding rattlesnakes when hiking.

Continue on the Trail

Staying on the route is the quickest and safest approach to avoid encountering rattlesnakes. In the early morning hours, rattlesnakes emerge from their burrows to take advantage of the sun’s rays. Other than that, rattlesnakes like to hide in shrubs or rocks. In order to avoid being seen by predators, such as feral pigs, kingsnakes, and roadrunners, they hide in the bushes. Avoid rattlesnakes by staying on the route and not tripping over rocks or crawling beneath bushes when out trekking.

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Prepare Your Wardrobe Ahead of Time

If you do get bitten, you’ll want to dress in such a way that your clothes and shoes take the brunt of the bite’s force. As a result, long leggings and ankle-covering shoes are required. Because of this, hiking boots that are well-made are ideal. Open-toe shoes, sandals, and Converse should never, ever be worn! Long trousers with reinforced knees and seats are the best option for pants.

Maintain Complete Concentration Throughout

At all times, remain mindful of your surroundings while trekking in an area known to be inhabited by rattlesnakes. Always trek with a companion and on a well-known path if at all feasible. Avoid going into dense vegetation or wooded areas without first inspecting them. Make sure there are no snakes in the vicinity before you take a break. Avoid stepping on rocks or logs to make sure there aren’t any snakes, and never grasp anything you see close since it may be a snake.

Carry a Walking Stick When Hiking

It’s easier to check for snakes if you hike with a stick. You can move anything in front of you out of the way with the stick. Snakes may be detected by shaking the neighboring grass and plants with the stick. Another benefit of this is that it warns snakes in the vicinity that people are around. If such is the case, they will make every effort to crawl away from you.

Be Extra Cautious When Surrounded by Water

Remember that snakes are capable of swimming. In fact, if you see anything that looks like a stick as you walk by the water, even if it’s water in a ditch, it might very well be a snake.

As you can see, the best strategy to avoid seeing a snake when hiking in an area known to contain them is to be a bit more proactive about your approach.

Identifying and Dealing With A Rattlesnake

In the event that you come face-to-face with a rattlesnake or any other sort of poisonous snake, the most important thing you can do is to remain cool and not freak out.

How difficult is that, right? Roughly speaking, rattlesnakes are more terrified of humans than the reverse is true. The only time they’ll bite is if they feel threatened, so you may just walk away and continue on your way even though it should go without saying. Never irritate a snake by taunting it or otherwise provoking it.

As a result, your chances of being bitten will be considerably increased because of its inherent tendency to defend itself. To be safe, you should just move away from the snake and let it go about its own business as well! The majority of persons who are bitten by rattlesnakes when they attempt to touch them are doing it for one of many reasons. Keep your hands well away from the snake at all times. Remove yourself from the snake’s path and do it as quickly as feasible.

Here’s What to Do If You Get Bitten

The best thing to do if you are bitten by a snake is to visit a doctor as soon as possible, no matter how cautious you are. However, what should you do first if you’re in the middle of the woods and want to accomplish anything before you get to the hospital for treatment?

If you’re a frequent hiker, you should already have one of the several over-the-the-counter snake bite kits in your bag. Avoid sucking out your wound’s venom, which may easily enter your bloodstream and inflict serious harm, contrary to popular belief. Follow the instructions in your kit and don’t panic, and if the symptoms are already beginning to develop, try to go to the hospital as soon as possible.

Conclusion

Avoiding rattlesnakes at all costs is the most effective method to ensure that you never get bitten by one, and now that you know how uncommon it is to get bitten or die as a result of a rattlesnake, bite, you should feel a little more confident about your next hiking excursion. However, avoid being overconfident or arrogant. Simply be cautious and use common sense, and you should be okay.

Source https://www.desertusa.com/reptiles/how-to-keep-rattlesnakes-away.html#:~:text=Tips%20To%20Avoid%20Rattlesnakes%20Be%20sure%20to%20walk,using%20your%20hands%20to%20move%20rocks%20or%20brush).

Source https://www.desertusa.com/reptiles/how-to-keep-rattlesnakes-away.html

Source https://snakebiteproofing.com/how-avoid-rattlesnakes-while-hiking/

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