Table of Contents

Where Can Green Card Holders Travel?

The United States green card is one of the most popular permanent resident permits and opens several doors for social and economic opportunities to people from all over the world. As a foreign national with permanent residency in the United States, you should know that there are numerous U.S. green card visa-free countries to which you can easily travel. In fact, you are free to travel outside the United States to your home country and other countries of your choice with the privilege of visiting those countries without a visa. In this article, we’ll cover:

  • Where green card holders can travel
  • Regulations for traveling out and returning to the U.S.
  • How long you can stay outside the United States
  • Required documents for traveling out and returning to the U.S.
  • Countries that grant a visa waiver for U.S. green card holders

Where can green card holders travel

Where Can I Travel With a Green Card and Without a Visa?

With your green card, you can travel to a number of countries without a visa. The United States has an agreement known as a “good neighbor policy” with Canada and Mexico. With this policy, as a green card holder, you don’t need to obtain a visa before traveling to any of these two countries. You will, however, need to present your passport to enter those countries.

Apart from the countries under the good neighbor policy, you can also travel to some other countries for the purpose of tourism without a visa. Those countries include Albania, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Aruba, Bahamas, Belize, Bermuda, Bonaire, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cayman Islands, Chile, Costa Rica, Curaçao, Dominican Republic, Georgia, Kosovo, Malaysia, Montenegro, Morocco, Oman, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Serbia, Singapore, Sint Maarten, South Korea, Taiwan, Turkey, Turks and Caicos, United Arab Emirates also grant visa waivers to U.S. green card holders.

Some of these countries have some restrictions for nationals of certain countries. Additionally, countries change their immigration laws from time to time. Therefore, before traveling to any of the countries or territories above, as a green card holder, it is recommended that you first check the requirements on their immigration website to be sure that a visa waiver is available to you.

Below you will find a map that outlines where visa-free countries for U.S. green card holders:

us green card visa free countries Map

Understanding the U.S. Green Card

The U.S. green card is the popular name for the official lawful permanent resident card (or I-551) issued to certain eligible foreign nationals by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). There are two major immigration statuses for noncitizens in the U.S. — immigrant status and nonimmigrant status.

Those with green cards are considered to have immigrant status, an immigration term that implies the eligibility to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis. The term “nonimmigrants,” on the other hand, refers to those who are in the U.S. on a temporary visa and are required to return to their home country on or before the expiration of their status. You can become a green card holder through employment , investment , or family ties to a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident , as well as a few other means.

Where Can I Travel With My Green Card?

According to the USCIS , a lawful permanent resident is free to travel outside the U.S., and brief or temporary travel usually does not affect your status. This freedom is for both lawful permanent residents and conditional green card holders. However, your travel arrangements must be made according to the travel regulations for your status. This includes having necessary documents that will allow you to travel outside and reenter the U.S. Although there are many U.S. green card visa-free countries you can travel to, the travel period in itself can have a negative impact on your residency status, depending on your immigration restrictions.

Documents Needed to Travel Outside the United States

To travel to a foreign country, you will need to present your passport and your green card. You may also need some additional documents depending on the country you are traveling to. This is because some foreign countries have their own entry and exit requirements which must be respected by every visitor.

Documents Needed to Reenter the United States

In general, after a brief or temporary trip abroad, you will need to present your valid, unexpired green card (I-551) upon your arrival from the foreign country. At the port of entry, your green card and other means of identity—such as your passport or foreign national I.D.—will be reviewed by a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer to determine if you can reenter the U.S. This requirement is applicable regardless of where the U.S green card holder traveled to a visa-free country or not.

How Long Can I Stay Outside the United States?

As a green card holder, you can travel and stay outside the United States for a period of six months without losing your permanent resident status. While your status grants you the freedom to travel in and out of the U.S., it is mandatory that you maintain legal status at all times, which includes establishing and maintaining a continuous physical presence. It is important to remember that traveling to visa-free countries for U.S. green card holders does not annul this requirement.

Staying abroad for more than six months but less than one year will likely lead to some questioning at the port of entry by the time you return to the United States. That doesn’t necessarily mean you will be denied entry as long as your journey abroad was within the parameters of your status. However, staying abroad for more than a year may indicate that you intend to abandon your permanent resident status. This is known as green card abandonment.

What Does Green Card Abandonment Mean?

Green card abandonment is a situation whereby a permanent resident gives up on his or her green card either intentionally or unintentionally. Staying outside the United States for too long is one of the acts that can be considered as having the intent of green card abandonment.

A general guide to determine whether or not abandonment has occurred is when you stay for more than a year abroad. In some cases, abandonment may be established if there are indications that you no longer have the intention of making the U.S. your permanent residence even during a brief or temporary journey that is less than a year.

After returning from a journey abroad, the CBP officer will base their assessment of your reentry eligibility on a number of criteria. This includes whether or not you maintained family and community ties, filed U.S. income taxes as a resident, and maintained U.S. employment while you were abroad.

They may also check to determine whether you maintained a U.S. mailing address, a valid U.S. driver’s license, a U.S. bank account, run a U.S. business, or own property in the United States. Maintaining any or some of these criteria will help in proving that your absence was indeed temporary and you had no intention of abandoning your permanent resident status.

What If I Want to Stay Longer Than One Year?

You may stay outside the United States for more than a year and still maintain your permanent resident status. This, however, has some requirements that must be put in place before you embark on the journey. To avoid denial at the port of entry, green card holders are advised to first apply for a re-entry permit before traveling outside the United States.

Whether you are a permanent or conditional green card holder, having a re-entry permit allows you to apply for admission to the U.S after returning from abroad without having to obtain a returning visa from a U.S. consulate or embassy. However, keep in mind that the permit will be issued with an expiration date, which means you can only use it to apply for admission on or before the expiration.

Expiration of Re-entry Permit

If you stay outside the United States for more than two years, your re-entry permit will have expired. In this scenario, you will have to obtain a returning resident visa (known as an SB-1) at a U.S. consulate or embassy. Applying for an SB-1 can be an extensive process that involves a medical exam, the establishment of eligibility for an immigrant visa, and other requirements.

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This is why it is not advisable to stay longer than the expiration of your re-entry visa. However, just like a re-entry permit, a returning resident visa will also not automatically grant you admission after your journey. The purpose of these documents is to help prove your case at the port of entry.

What Happens If My SB-1 Application is Denied?

If, for any reason, the immigration officials deny your returning visa application, you will not be allowed to enter the U.S. unless you acquire another valid visa. The common reason for SB-1 denial is failing to demonstrate strong ties to the United States while you were away. In this case, your only option is to reapply for another immigrant visa, which can be under the same category you had previously or you can explore other available options.

The downside to this is that you will have to start the process all over again. For instance, if you apply for an employment or family-based green card, the process will cost you and your sponsor another round of expenses, force your sponsor to file a new petition, and have you attend another interview This could possibly have a very long processing time, and, in the end, there is no guarantee of getting it. This is why it is important to be cautious and ensure you don’t stay abroad for more than the stipulated time when you travel on your green card.

What Happens If I Lose My Green Card While I am Abroad?

It is not impossible for your green card or reentry permit to get lost or destroyed while you away. If this happens, you will need to file a Form, I-31A, Application for Travel Document (Carrier Documentation). Without having your green card, reentry permit, or I-131A, you will find it difficult to find an airline or any other transportation carrier back to the U.S. Allowing a traveler without proper documentation aboard a transportation carrier may lead to sanction on the company.

Does Travel Outside the U.S. Affect the Naturalization Process?

If you dream of becoming a U.S. citizen someday, you might want to take extra precautions when it comes to your stay outside the United States. According to the USCIS, “absences from the U.S. of six months or more may disrupt the continuous residency required for naturalization.”

During your naturalization process, you will be asked to disclose all trips taken outside the United States for the five years preceding the citizenship application. If you are found to have stayed abroad for more than a period of six months, this may affect your chances of citizenship eligibility. However, for those who must unavoidably stay abroad for a long period, there is a provision in the N-470 Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Process .

This application will help you preserve your status if you have to stay abroad for a period of one year or longer. The eligibility for the N-470 must be based on a very genuine, such as employment purposes for the U.S. government, a recognized U.S. firm, a mission, or denomination that has a bona fide organization in the U.S., and other recognized entities .

Frequently Asked Questions About Green Card Travel

Below you will find answers to the most commonly asked questions about visa-free travel for green card holders.

Can you travel with a green card/permanent resident card?

You are eligible to travel outside of the U.S. as a green card holder/permanent resident. U.S. permanent residents are allowed to travel anywhere in the world, depending on their ability to enter the country of their destination. However, as a green card holder, there are a number of visa-free countries that do not require any additional paperwork for entry. The proof of your U.S. green card will be enough to grant entry.

Can you fly with a green card?

Yes, as a green card holder you can board domestic and international flights. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) accepts a variety of personal identification documents such as:

  • U.S. green card;
  • U.S. passport;
  • Driver’s license;
  • Border crossing card;
  • An acceptable photo ID issued by a federally recognized Tribal Nation/Indian Tribe; and
  • Many other forms of identification.

What are U.S. green card travel benefits?

There are several travel benefits to having a green card. Firstly, you can easily leave, enter, and re-enter the U.S. You will not be subject to denial of entry unless you violate the U.S. or international laws. Secondly, you are eligible to travel to many visa-free countries with your U.S. green card. To visit those countries, you will not need any additional paperwork or visas for entry. Your U.S. green card will be enough.

How VisaNation Law Group Can Help

While you are allowed to travel the world as a lawful permanent resident, it is important to take precautions on circumstances that could make you lose your green card or affect your eligibility for citizenship in the future. Whether you are already a green card holder or in the process of acquiring it, you need to know how to make the most of your status. This is why you should work with experienced green card immigration attorneys.

VisaNation Law Group has a team of highly experienced green card attorneys with extensive knowledge of the immigration rules for permanent residents, especially travel regulations. For a professional guide on your travel documentation, including a re-entry permit, or returning visa application, you can always count on them. Additionally, if your application for any of these has been denied, they can help you regain entry to the U.S. You can contact and book an appointment with VisaNation Law Group today by filling out this consultation form.

Where Can Green Card Holders Travel?

The United States green card is one of the most popular permanent resident permits and opens several doors for social and economic opportunities to people from all over the world. As a foreign national with permanent residency in the United States, you should know that there are numerous U.S. green card visa-free countries to which you can easily travel. In fact, you are free to travel outside the United States to your home country and other countries of your choice with the privilege of visiting those countries without a visa. In this article, we’ll cover:

  • Where green card holders can travel
  • Regulations for traveling out and returning to the U.S.
  • How long you can stay outside the United States
  • Required documents for traveling out and returning to the U.S.
  • Countries that grant a visa waiver for U.S. green card holders

Where can green card holders travel

Where Can I Travel With a Green Card and Without a Visa?

With your green card, you can travel to a number of countries without a visa. The United States has an agreement known as a “good neighbor policy” with Canada and Mexico. With this policy, as a green card holder, you don’t need to obtain a visa before traveling to any of these two countries. You will, however, need to present your passport to enter those countries.

Apart from the countries under the good neighbor policy, you can also travel to some other countries for the purpose of tourism without a visa. Those countries include Albania, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Aruba, Bahamas, Belize, Bermuda, Bonaire, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cayman Islands, Chile, Costa Rica, Curaçao, Dominican Republic, Georgia, Kosovo, Malaysia, Montenegro, Morocco, Oman, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Serbia, Singapore, Sint Maarten, South Korea, Taiwan, Turkey, Turks and Caicos, United Arab Emirates also grant visa waivers to U.S. green card holders.

Some of these countries have some restrictions for nationals of certain countries. Additionally, countries change their immigration laws from time to time. Therefore, before traveling to any of the countries or territories above, as a green card holder, it is recommended that you first check the requirements on their immigration website to be sure that a visa waiver is available to you.

Below you will find a map that outlines where visa-free countries for U.S. green card holders:

us green card visa free countries Map

Understanding the U.S. Green Card

The U.S. green card is the popular name for the official lawful permanent resident card (or I-551) issued to certain eligible foreign nationals by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). There are two major immigration statuses for noncitizens in the U.S. — immigrant status and nonimmigrant status.

Those with green cards are considered to have immigrant status, an immigration term that implies the eligibility to live and work in the United States on a permanent basis. The term “nonimmigrants,” on the other hand, refers to those who are in the U.S. on a temporary visa and are required to return to their home country on or before the expiration of their status. You can become a green card holder through employment , investment , or family ties to a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident , as well as a few other means.

Where Can I Travel With My Green Card?

According to the USCIS , a lawful permanent resident is free to travel outside the U.S., and brief or temporary travel usually does not affect your status. This freedom is for both lawful permanent residents and conditional green card holders. However, your travel arrangements must be made according to the travel regulations for your status. This includes having necessary documents that will allow you to travel outside and reenter the U.S. Although there are many U.S. green card visa-free countries you can travel to, the travel period in itself can have a negative impact on your residency status, depending on your immigration restrictions.

Documents Needed to Travel Outside the United States

To travel to a foreign country, you will need to present your passport and your green card. You may also need some additional documents depending on the country you are traveling to. This is because some foreign countries have their own entry and exit requirements which must be respected by every visitor.

Documents Needed to Reenter the United States

In general, after a brief or temporary trip abroad, you will need to present your valid, unexpired green card (I-551) upon your arrival from the foreign country. At the port of entry, your green card and other means of identity—such as your passport or foreign national I.D.—will be reviewed by a U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer to determine if you can reenter the U.S. This requirement is applicable regardless of where the U.S green card holder traveled to a visa-free country or not.

How Long Can I Stay Outside the United States?

As a green card holder, you can travel and stay outside the United States for a period of six months without losing your permanent resident status. While your status grants you the freedom to travel in and out of the U.S., it is mandatory that you maintain legal status at all times, which includes establishing and maintaining a continuous physical presence. It is important to remember that traveling to visa-free countries for U.S. green card holders does not annul this requirement.

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Staying abroad for more than six months but less than one year will likely lead to some questioning at the port of entry by the time you return to the United States. That doesn’t necessarily mean you will be denied entry as long as your journey abroad was within the parameters of your status. However, staying abroad for more than a year may indicate that you intend to abandon your permanent resident status. This is known as green card abandonment.

What Does Green Card Abandonment Mean?

Green card abandonment is a situation whereby a permanent resident gives up on his or her green card either intentionally or unintentionally. Staying outside the United States for too long is one of the acts that can be considered as having the intent of green card abandonment.

A general guide to determine whether or not abandonment has occurred is when you stay for more than a year abroad. In some cases, abandonment may be established if there are indications that you no longer have the intention of making the U.S. your permanent residence even during a brief or temporary journey that is less than a year.

After returning from a journey abroad, the CBP officer will base their assessment of your reentry eligibility on a number of criteria. This includes whether or not you maintained family and community ties, filed U.S. income taxes as a resident, and maintained U.S. employment while you were abroad.

They may also check to determine whether you maintained a U.S. mailing address, a valid U.S. driver’s license, a U.S. bank account, run a U.S. business, or own property in the United States. Maintaining any or some of these criteria will help in proving that your absence was indeed temporary and you had no intention of abandoning your permanent resident status.

What If I Want to Stay Longer Than One Year?

You may stay outside the United States for more than a year and still maintain your permanent resident status. This, however, has some requirements that must be put in place before you embark on the journey. To avoid denial at the port of entry, green card holders are advised to first apply for a re-entry permit before traveling outside the United States.

Whether you are a permanent or conditional green card holder, having a re-entry permit allows you to apply for admission to the U.S after returning from abroad without having to obtain a returning visa from a U.S. consulate or embassy. However, keep in mind that the permit will be issued with an expiration date, which means you can only use it to apply for admission on or before the expiration.

Expiration of Re-entry Permit

If you stay outside the United States for more than two years, your re-entry permit will have expired. In this scenario, you will have to obtain a returning resident visa (known as an SB-1) at a U.S. consulate or embassy. Applying for an SB-1 can be an extensive process that involves a medical exam, the establishment of eligibility for an immigrant visa, and other requirements.

This is why it is not advisable to stay longer than the expiration of your re-entry visa. However, just like a re-entry permit, a returning resident visa will also not automatically grant you admission after your journey. The purpose of these documents is to help prove your case at the port of entry.

What Happens If My SB-1 Application is Denied?

If, for any reason, the immigration officials deny your returning visa application, you will not be allowed to enter the U.S. unless you acquire another valid visa. The common reason for SB-1 denial is failing to demonstrate strong ties to the United States while you were away. In this case, your only option is to reapply for another immigrant visa, which can be under the same category you had previously or you can explore other available options.

The downside to this is that you will have to start the process all over again. For instance, if you apply for an employment or family-based green card, the process will cost you and your sponsor another round of expenses, force your sponsor to file a new petition, and have you attend another interview This could possibly have a very long processing time, and, in the end, there is no guarantee of getting it. This is why it is important to be cautious and ensure you don’t stay abroad for more than the stipulated time when you travel on your green card.

What Happens If I Lose My Green Card While I am Abroad?

It is not impossible for your green card or reentry permit to get lost or destroyed while you away. If this happens, you will need to file a Form, I-31A, Application for Travel Document (Carrier Documentation). Without having your green card, reentry permit, or I-131A, you will find it difficult to find an airline or any other transportation carrier back to the U.S. Allowing a traveler without proper documentation aboard a transportation carrier may lead to sanction on the company.

Does Travel Outside the U.S. Affect the Naturalization Process?

If you dream of becoming a U.S. citizen someday, you might want to take extra precautions when it comes to your stay outside the United States. According to the USCIS, “absences from the U.S. of six months or more may disrupt the continuous residency required for naturalization.”

During your naturalization process, you will be asked to disclose all trips taken outside the United States for the five years preceding the citizenship application. If you are found to have stayed abroad for more than a period of six months, this may affect your chances of citizenship eligibility. However, for those who must unavoidably stay abroad for a long period, there is a provision in the N-470 Application to Preserve Residence for Naturalization Process .

This application will help you preserve your status if you have to stay abroad for a period of one year or longer. The eligibility for the N-470 must be based on a very genuine, such as employment purposes for the U.S. government, a recognized U.S. firm, a mission, or denomination that has a bona fide organization in the U.S., and other recognized entities .

Frequently Asked Questions About Green Card Travel

Below you will find answers to the most commonly asked questions about visa-free travel for green card holders.

Can you travel with a green card/permanent resident card?

You are eligible to travel outside of the U.S. as a green card holder/permanent resident. U.S. permanent residents are allowed to travel anywhere in the world, depending on their ability to enter the country of their destination. However, as a green card holder, there are a number of visa-free countries that do not require any additional paperwork for entry. The proof of your U.S. green card will be enough to grant entry.

Can you fly with a green card?

Yes, as a green card holder you can board domestic and international flights. The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) accepts a variety of personal identification documents such as:

  • U.S. green card;
  • U.S. passport;
  • Driver’s license;
  • Border crossing card;
  • An acceptable photo ID issued by a federally recognized Tribal Nation/Indian Tribe; and
  • Many other forms of identification.

What are U.S. green card travel benefits?

There are several travel benefits to having a green card. Firstly, you can easily leave, enter, and re-enter the U.S. You will not be subject to denial of entry unless you violate the U.S. or international laws. Secondly, you are eligible to travel to many visa-free countries with your U.S. green card. To visit those countries, you will not need any additional paperwork or visas for entry. Your U.S. green card will be enough.

How VisaNation Law Group Can Help

While you are allowed to travel the world as a lawful permanent resident, it is important to take precautions on circumstances that could make you lose your green card or affect your eligibility for citizenship in the future. Whether you are already a green card holder or in the process of acquiring it, you need to know how to make the most of your status. This is why you should work with experienced green card immigration attorneys.

VisaNation Law Group has a team of highly experienced green card attorneys with extensive knowledge of the immigration rules for permanent residents, especially travel regulations. For a professional guide on your travel documentation, including a re-entry permit, or returning visa application, you can always count on them. Additionally, if your application for any of these has been denied, they can help you regain entry to the U.S. You can contact and book an appointment with VisaNation Law Group today by filling out this consultation form.

Which Countries Can Green Card Holders Travel to Without a Visa?

Which Countries Can Green Card Holders Travel to Without a Visa?

Citizens of the US are allowed to fly to 184 countries worldwide visa free. As a result, several countries have granted the same right to those who have lawful permanent resident status. However, foreign nationals residing in the United States who hold a Green Card are allowed to travel without a visa to some non-US countries. See other benefits of Green Card.

You can only fly abroad with your residence permit if you are traveling to a country that grants equal rights to U.S. residents.

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Countries that Green Card holders can travel to without a visa

Below you can find the list of some countries that Green Card holders can travel to without the need of having a visa.

Canada

Traveling to Canada is simple if you have a valid U.S. Green Card. However, you do need to obtain an eTA (Electronic Travel Authorization), in other words a permission that grants you access to legally cross the border with Canada.

Once you reach the border of Canada, you will only need to show your eTA to the border agents. You will however, be asked to also present your passport and Green Card as well.

Find out more about Green Card from these articles:

  • Can I Travel if the Names on My Passport and Green Card Don’t Match?
  • Emergency Travel with an Expired Passport
  • Can You Fly if You Have a Warrant?
  • Visa Application Support Letter
  • Do Green Card Holders Need Visa For Mexico?
  • Do You Need a Passport to Go to Alaska?
  • Traveling With a Damaged Passport
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Mexico

Similar to Canada, when travelling to Mexico, you will also have to show your passport and your Green Card.

Nevertheless, you do need one of the following to get a Mexico Tourist Card:

  1. You’ll get one from the aircraft crew if you are traveling by plane.
  2. Another way is to print your online tourist card and bring it with you.
  3. Before you fly, you can get one at the Embassy of Mexico in the U.S.
  4. At the immigration office after your arrival in Mexico.
  5. If you’re traveling by sea, you can collect it at the port call.
  6. At the entry point if you are traveling by land.

Belize

For Belize, you will need a passport that has been valid for a period of at least 6 (six) months after the end of your stay. You will need a copy of your Green Card that has been notarized, a visa registration form, and evidence of appropriate funds needed for your stay in Belize.

  • Costa Rica
  • Virgin Islands of Britain
  • Dominican republic
  • Jamaica.

Costa Rica

With a Green Card you can visit Costa Rica’s natural parks, beautiful islands and enjoy the tropical weather. A Green Card is all you need in order to travel to Costa Rica. Thus, a visa will not be required.

The necessary documents are:

  • a valid passport
  • the Green Card
  • the booked ticket which indicates the return date.

With a Green Card you can only stay for up to 30 (thirty) days. If you are looking to stay longer then you will be required to apply for an extension.

Travel to Costa Rica, Mexico and Canada without a visa.

Georgia

There are also some European countries that you can visit with a Green Card, one of them being Georgia. You might know Georgia for its splendid wines, but that’s not all you can look forward to when visiting this country. In Georgia, you can visit many beautiful sites, old town streets, parks, and some breathtaking mountains.

A visa will not be required for your visit for Green Card holders. As for the documents, they are similar to those necessary when traveling to other countries: you will need your passport, Green Card, and boarding pass. As a Green Card holder you will be able to stay in Georgia for up to 90 (ninety) days visa free.

The Balkans

The Balkans are an absolutely stupendous area of Southern Europe, including countries like Albania, Montenegro, and North Macedonia. These three countries allow Green Card holders to visit them visa free for a maximum of:

  • 90 days within a 180-day period – Albania
  • 30 days – Montenegro
  • 15 days – North Macedonia.

The upside of visiting Balkan countries is that they’re a lot more affordable than their more mainstream European counterparts such as, for example, France, Spain, or the UK. They have tons of wonderful attractions and absolutely phenomenal views to offer, and they’re also more low-key in terms of tourist traffic.

Virgin Islands of Britain

If you are looking for a beautiful place with gorgeous beaches and a place to spend an amazing summer, then these British Islands are definitely a destination you should take a look at.

Besides your Green Card you will need your passport, return flight ticket, and also proof of accommodation on the islands.

U.S. Green Card holders can stay for a maximum of 30 (thirty) days visa free in the British Virgin Islands.

Curaçao and Aruba

With their amazing swimming spots and underwater life, these two countries have a lot to offer to their tourists.

All you’ll need is your Green Card, and you’ll be good to go and have an amazing time on any of the picturesque beaches of Curacao and Aruba.

Singapore

Singapore is yet another wonderful location that Green Card holders can visit without a visa. However, U.S. permanent residents will only be able to enjoy Singapore visa free for 4 (four) days unless they happen to be happy holders of either a Chinese or Indian passport.

If they fulfill the specified criteria, Chinese and Indian citizens are qualified for the Singaporean Visa Free Transit Facility:

  • travel by sea or air
  • have a legitimate plane ticket or ferry ticket booked for the next 96 hours from Singapore
  • are granted a Green Card.

Peru is yet another state where you can travel with a Green Card only if you are an Indian or Chinese citizen.

You have probably heard of Peru’s destinations such as Machu Picchu or other historical sites, sometimes filled with mysteries that have yet to be uncovered. If you are obsessed with history and archaeology then Peru can offer just that.

The documents you need are: a passport, boarding pass, and your Green Card. Once you reach the entry point, you will be granted a tourist card which will serve as evidence of how long you plan to stay in Peru. You cannot stay for longer than 90 days.

Traveling to European countries with a Green Card

Green Card holders’ travel to Europe is limited to only a few non-EU countries, as some European states provide a visa waiver to Green Card holders where you will not be required to have a valid visa to travel.

It all depends on which country’s passport you hold. For instance, if the citizens of your country of origin are normally required to apply for a Schengen visa (or any other European country’s tourist visa) prior to a Euro trip, then as a U.S. Green Card holder you will still be required to apply for such a visa.

If you do obtain a Schengen visa, you will be allowed to stay in the Schengen Area (which includes 26 countries) for a period of up to 90 days.

Can I travel to the UK with only a Green Card?

Unfortunately, you cannot. Even if you do have a U.S. Green Card, you will still be required to obtain a UK visa to travel to the UK.

The UK visa program requires residents of many nations (which are mostly EU and Commonwealth nations) to be granted visa-free access for up to six months. You would have to request a regular UK visitor visa if you don’t come from any of the countries listed in the visa exemptions.

Do I need a passport if I have a Green Card?

The short answer is yes. A valid passport will be required regardless whether you have a Green Card or not.

You won’t be allowed to fly abroad if you don’t hold a valid passport. When you cross a country’s border, whether by land or air, the border officials will most likely ask for your passport and probably a visa or residency permit.

In certain situations, you won’t be asked to show your passport at the border. Only citizens of neighboring countries or regions with an arrangement of some kind in place (such as Schengen Area citizens) do not need to display a passport.

Get your U.S. Green Card photo with Passport Photo Online

If you need to get your Green Card photo (or any other document photo for that matter) fast, you can help yourself with our U.S. passport photo tool to easily get your shot online – Passport Photo Online. All you will need to do is upload a photo for your Green Card and within a few seconds, it will be sent to you via email.

Our AI tools automatically crop the photo to the required size and fix any possible mistakes in the image. You will also be notified right away in case of any errors in your picture, and prompted to retake your shot and upload it again. You won’t be charged for any additional photos you take or upload, just your final, polished picture.

Passport Photo Online app has been recognized by Forbes, National Geographic, Yahoo!, and Glamour, and has served a million users since its inception 7 years ago.

Visa free countries for U.S. Green Card holders – wrap up

The U.S. Green Card has been known for its many benefits, and one of them is definitely the ability to travel to some exquisite locations around the world visa free.

Some of the visa free countries that you can enjoy visiting as a Green Card holder include Albania, Belize, Canada, Costa Rica, Georgia, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Peru, and more.

Each one of these countries has their own established maximum period of stay, the shortest one being 4 days (Singapore). Always make sure that you have a valid passport, with a minimum of 6-month validity to be on the safe side.

Visa free countries for US Green Card holders: FAQ

I am a Green Card holder. Can I travel to Europe visa free?

As a Green Card holder you can visit a couple European countries, including Albania, Georgia, Montenegro, and North Macedonia. If you’re planning to visit an EU country, you will be required to obtain a Schengen Visa that will allow you to stay in the Schengen Area for up to 90 days.

What countries can I travel to as a Green Card holder?

The visa free countries that US permanent residents with a Green Card can travel to are: Albania, Aruba, Belize, the British Virgin Islands, Canada, Costa Rica, Curaçao, Georgia, Mexico, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Peru, and Singapore.

As a Green Card holder, do I need a tourist visa to travel to Mexico?

You won’t need a tourist visa to travel to Mexico, but you will be required to obtain a tourist card, which you can either apply for online before your trip, get it on the plane, or upon your arrival in Mexico.

Will I need a visa to travel to Canada as a U.S. permanent resident?

If you have a valid Green Card you won’t need to apply for a Canadian visa in order to travel, however if you plan to cross the USA-Canada border by plane you will have to apply for an eTA (Electronic Travel Authorization).

How long can Green Card holders stay in Peru visa free?

Upon your arrival in Peru, an immigration officer will give you a tourist card that will include the maximum amount of time that you can spend in Peru visa free – it will usually be a period of no longer than 90 days.

Source https://www.immi-usa.com/traveling-green-card/locations/

Source https://www.immi-usa.com/traveling-green-card/locations/

Source https://passport-photo.online/blog/green-card-holder-travel-without-visa/

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