Which Countries Are Open For Travel & Tourism? When Will International Flights Resume? (Updated Regularly)

Find out which countries are open for you based on your country of residence and vaccination status.

Find out the specific travel restrictions for a particular route and travel date.

Table of Contents

COVID-19 Travel Restrictions For Every Country (Full Details)

Click on your desired country and get its complete & most up-to-date information about travel restrictions, test requirements & quarantine details and more. Additionally, we’ve also provided dedicated pages for Covid Test For Travel In 2022 (All Countries) and Quarantine Guidelines For Travel In 2022 (All Countries)

Middle East & North Africa

Algeria | Bahrain | Egypt | Iran | Iraq | Israel | Jordan | Kuwait | Lebanon | Libya | Morocco | Oman | Qatar | Saudi Arabia | Syria | Tunisia | United Arab Emirates | Yemen

Africa

Europe

North America

South America

Oceania

Top 10 Countries You Can Travel to for a Holiday Now

Updated November 2022

Denmark

A tranquil, modern, and peaceful country consistently ranked among the world’s happiest, Denmark is regarded by many as the epitome of Scandinavian culture and is the place to visit if you’re looking to retrace the footsteps of the legendary Vikings as well as bask in the country’s enchanting fairytale setting. Perhaps it’s due to the unbearable cold of the North, but you’ll be surprised at how natural it is for the Danes to readily invite you into the warmth and comfort of their home.

There are no COVID-19-related restrictions on entry into Denmark.

The Bahamas

It’s common knowledge that the Bahamas is blessed with paradisiacal beaches and alluring waters. However, visitors can also expect to discover a charming culture where exotic gastronomy along with the islands’ rich history will make your stay truly memorable.

All travelers, regardless of vaccination status, are no longer required to submit to pre-travel COVID-19 testing to enter the country. COVID-19 testing is also no longer required for persons traveling inter-island (domestic) within the Bahamas, regardless of their COVID-19 vaccination status. Finally, the Bahamas Travel Health Visa is no longer a requirement to enter the country.

Mexico

Mexico is the place to be for lovers of culture, gastronomy, and outdoor activities. With 30,000 years of history, Mexico offers insight into a kaleidoscope of ancient civilizations that had thrived long before the arrival of Columbus. Visitors to the country will be greeted by stretches of idyllic beaches, towering volcanoes and tantalizing cuisines under the watchful eye of the omnipresent sun.

Pandemic or otherwise, Mexico is one of the few countries that did not close its borders to visitors. Mexico does not currently request tests, vaccines, or quarantine upon arrival.

El Salvador

The tropical haven of El Salvador, better known as the Land of Volcanoes, is not only home to beautiful volcano craters you cannot find elsewhere, but it is also famous for its beautiful beaches perfect for surfing. Despite the COVID surge in Central America, El Salvador has managed to keep new COVID infections at bay.

You do not need proof of COVID-19 vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test in order to enter the country. You should, however, bring proof of vaccination with you, as this may occasionally be required for entry to specific events.

Maldives

A famous archipelago in the Indian Ocean- known for idyllic, laid-back, luxury vacations, Maldives has ambitious plans of vaccinating visitors once its resident population is immunized. As of now, the scattered country is receiving travelers, without asking those vaccinated to quarantine.

Pre-arrival PCR test is not required for all passengers arriving in Maldives. However, All individuals except tourists and Maldivians are recommended to undertake PCR testing between 3-5 days after arrival. Travelers who have symptoms of COVID-19 may take an antigen test. Please note that all travelers to the Maldives must fill in a Traveller Declaration Form within 96 hours of arrival/departure.

Travel-related quarantine is no longer required

Croatia

With more than 1,200 islands and islets, Croatia is known as having some of the prettiest beaches in Europe, perfect for holidays, with Ancient Roman Ruins, castles and secluded coves.

There are no COVID-19-related restrictions on entry into Croatia. Travelers looking to enter Croatia are no longer required to present an EU digital COVID certificate or any other certificate related to COVID-19. Additionally, the requirement to complete an online entry form before arriving in Croatia no longer applies.

Costa Rica

A journey through Costa Rica means immersing oneself in the cultural highlights of the central highlands, adventurous treks through volcanoes and national parks, or rejuvenating after countless activities at its excellent spas. Over the years, many travelers have come to appreciate the diversity offered by Costa Rica as it offers something for essentially everyone.

The Government of Costa Rica does not require tourists entering by air, land or sea to present a negative COVID-19 test, nor quarantine upon arrival. Tourists can verify if they require entry with or without a visa at the following link: https://migracion.go.cr/Paginas/Visas.aspx.

The United Kingdom

The UK is always a great place to visit; England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland along with the offshore Islands provide g reat views and fabulous scenery. The forces of nature, such as the wind, seas, and earth, have conspired to endow this relatively small island kingdom with mountains and ranges of majestic hills, rolling farmlands, exquisite lakes, and gentle valleys and streams.

If you will arrive in England from abroad, you are not required to:

  • complete a UK passenger locator form before you travel to England from abroad
  • take any COVID-19 tests before you travel or after you arrive
  • quarantine when you arrive

This applies to both vaccinated and unvaccinated travelers.

Norway

Norway is well-known for what it offers; sumptuous landscapes and unspoiled nature, and a plethora of outdoor activities. From its nature parks, fjords, glaciers and naturally the northern lights and midnight sun, there are plenty of reasons to make Norway your next vacation destination.

There are no requirements for testing, quarantine or registration upon arrival in Norway.

Saudi Arabia

A religious haven for adherents of the Islamic faith and a dazzling country of the Middle East, Saudi Arabia is a Kingdom filled with endless diversities. From a top-class scuba diving spot in the Red Sea, the holiest Islamic cities of Makkah and Madinah, to being a diverse environment home to the Arabian Leopard, it’s no exaggeration to say that a trip to Saudi Arabia makes for an enchanting getaway.

All COVID‑19 restrictions for travel to Saudi Arabia have been lifted. Travelers are no longer required to hold a COVID‑19 vaccination certificate or a COVID‑19 test result to enter the country. Quarantine restrictions have also been lifted.

France

Paris, along with other French cities, has long attracted international attention for their beauty, culture, and people. Being a diverse and sophisticated city, Paris appeals to most tourists by way of its beautiful architecture, landmarks, and amazing food. Apart from the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France has several other gorgeous landmarks and monuments allowing for some truly memorable photo opportunities.

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France has ended all its COVID-19-related entry restrictions since 1 August 2022. Travelers to France do not need to show proof of vaccination or proof of having recovered from COVID-19. Pre-departure testing has also been done away with.

When will international travel return? Here’s what we know right now

The number of people busting out of their countries will start creeping up this spring and rise higher by mid-year, travel industry experts predict, as vaccines and risk-based safety measures are rolled out more widely and spiking coronavirus cases around the world begin to fall once again.

“I’m actually quite confident that first of May onwards . we’ll all be in a much better world,” said Paul Charles, founder and CEO of London-based travel consultancy The PC Agency.

Vaccines and testing are the way forward, Charles and other industry experts say, but what’s needed perhaps as desperately is greater consistency and coordination across borders.

“When you don’t have a coordinated global approach, it’s very difficult for the industry to go forward, especially when you have the rules of the game changing basically every single day,” said Luis Felipe de Oliveira, director general of Airports Council International (ACI), a global trade organization representing the world’s airports.

Departure testing is one component of making travel safer during the pandemic.

There’s a lot more work to be done in ironing out testing protocols that would allow globetrotters to opt out of quarantines and finding ways to smoothly and securely share vaccination and testing information across borders.

Sovereign nations still decide what’s best for them individually, looking at their own health situations and economies, but progress has been made in getting countries to look more globally at the huge economic force that is travel.

An alphabet soup of agencies, organizations and companies (UNWTO, ICAO, ACI, WTTC, the airlines and so on) have collaborated on numerous sets of guidelines and global recommendations aimed at making travel safer, easier and less confusing for a world of consumers starving for a change of scene.

ACI’s de Oliveira says that the summer rebound could mean international air traffic reaching 50% to 60% of previous levels in most countries.

Eliminating quarantines

Mandatory — and shifting — quarantine requirements “basically are killing the process to restart the industry,” de Oliveira said.

When he spoke to CNN Travel, de Oliveira was on day 12 of a 14-day quarantine in Montreal after returning home from a business trip to the Dominican Republic followed by a personal trip to Mexico. He has quarantined four times in the past seven months, spending 56 days at home without the possibility of going out.

That kind of time investment, along with the confusion around requirements — both going and coming home — are big deterrents for people who might otherwise be willing to travel. Safety is essential, but those in the industry are advocating for a more nuanced, layered approach.

Travelers at a hotel in Melbourne, Australia in December had to quarantine after returning from overseas.

Travelers at a hotel in Melbourne, Australia in December had to quarantine after returning from overseas.

A test-out mechanism is needed to avoid quarantines, says Tori Emerson Barnes, executive vice president of public affairs and policy at the national nonprofit U.S. Travel Association, which has been advocating for a science-driven, risk-based approach to reopening international travel “in particular looking at the elimination of quarantines if you have the right testing protocol in place.”

While vaccines will be critical, de Oliveira and others say the travel industry absolutely cannot afford to wait to ramp up until vaccinations are fully administered globally, making testing an essential part of the equation for safer travel in the near-term.

Barnes mentioned a two-tiered regimen of testing 72 hours before departure and again upon arrival as one possible standard, and she cited a testing pilot program in Hawaii — where a 10-day quarantine can be bypassed on most islands with negative test results — as an example of where testing out of quarantine has generated demand.

While U.S. Travel would encourage people to get vaccinated and to test out in places that require quarantines, the association isn’t looking for blanket requirements for access, Barnes said. “We wouldn’t say that you have to have a vaccine to travel.”

She acknowledges that determining who is responsible for creating and implementing consistent protocols is a challenge. “The government doesn’t necessarily want to,” she said, “and I don’t know that the private sector should have that responsibility.”

Yet countries and organizations around the world are making progress in coordinating common approaches, says Alessandra Priante, regional director for Europe at the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), a specialized agency of the United Nations.

A coordinated way of testing is already being implemented in numerous cases, and the next step at a global level is tracing, Priante says, “to make sure that we’re able to share a certain amount of data, because if we don’t share the data, then we are not really able to have all the information that we should have.”

The travel industry can't afford to wait until vaccines have been distributed globally to ramp up.

Getting vaccinated . and proving it

Some of that information likely would pertain to vaccinations. The United Kingdom’s vaccination program is well under way. Other countries have also made significant progress, and the United States’ program is slowly ramping up.

Traveler confusion may well ramp up, too, as more people start moving around in the spring and additional requirements come into play for negative tests and proof of vaccination.

Australia, for example, just announced that it will require negative PCR Covid tests for all travelers, and airline Qantas has suggested that all international passengers may soon be required to have a vaccination certificate.

We’ll need a harmonized global approach to recognizing and accurately and safely sharing vaccination and testing information, de Oliveira said.

Current practices — involving printed paper documents from unknown labs in languages that may be unfamiliar to those inspecting them or a tangle of unconnected databases across the world — are less than ideal.

That’s why ACI supports the use of health apps such as CommonPass, a tool that would allow travelers to share lab results and vaccination records without revealing other personal health information. The International Air Transport Association (IATA) is also working on a digital Travel Pass platform.

Even when vaccines do become widely available, not everyone will take them and researchers are looking at whether the virus could be still be transmitted by vaccinated people. Masking, social distancing, sanitation and other safety layers will still be part of daily life — and travel — for a long time to come.

Travel bubbles -- like the anticipated two-way corridor between New Zealand and Australia -- are among the tailored measures aimed at restoring some international travel.

Travel bubbles — like the anticipated two-way corridor between New Zealand and Australia — are among the tailored measures aimed at restoring some international travel.

Measures in the meantime

Even as we wait for declines in coronavirus cases and more global coordination around safer, less confusing cross-border travel, destinations and corporations increasingly are rolling out their own interim solutions.

Delta Air Lines is trying out a handful of Covid-tested, quarantine-free flights to the Netherlands. These flights employ a combination of the gold-standard PCR testing with preboarding rapid antigen testing.

De Oliveira sees rapid antigen testing as a potential aid in the industry’s recovery. While considered less accurate, antigen tests are also much quicker and less expensive than molecular tests as one layer of risk management.

Iceland and Hungary have embraced the concept of “immunity passports,” allowing people to enter who have already been infected with Covid-19 and recovered.

Travel bubbles, such as a much-anticipated, two-way corridor between New Zealand and Australia, allow people to travel back and forth between countries without quarantining.

“Corridors can be useful if they’re consistent, but again, they’ve been up and down, opening and shutting at short notice and that has not helped consumers at all,” said Paul Charles, the travel industry consultant.

Ultimately, travelers would like to get back to safely mixing and mingling with the rest of the world.

Ultimately, travelers would like to get back to safely mixing and mingling with the rest of the world.

The great goal: Mingling with strangers

“What I regret the most is that all that tourism is about, which is to trust the unknown . the beauty of exploring, of meeting somebody you’ve never met before from another culture, another nation, is all sort of on hold and at stake because people are telling us ‘don’t trust anyone, cross the sidewalk, wear your mask, don’t mingle,’ ” she said from her home in Madrid.

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And while Priante and her colleagues have taken every precaution and continued to travel and work to address the global crisis that is threatening livelihoods in the industry, she wants to see more people traveling safely.

“We want to get the spirit of tourism back into the heart of people. Because tourism is about building memories . and we want to get back to that, we want to become again the industry of beautiful memories.”

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Travel to Europe: A Reopening Timeline, Country by Country

Jamie Ditaranto is a freelance journalist, photographer, and full-time traveler. Before writing for TripSavvy, Jamie was the Editor of Video and Content for SmarterTravel.com, where she sought to share unique travel experiences like barge cruising in France and sleeping in centuries-old Japanese inns.

France Eases Coronavirus Lockdown

Most European countries are allowing Americans to enter on the condition they can show proof of vaccination. Some will also still accept a negative test result from unvaccinated travelers. In many countries, you may be asked to show proof of vaccination to enter a restaurant or check in to your hotel.

After the emergence of the Omicron variant in late 2021, many places have banned or restricted travel from Southern African countries and tightened entry requirements. However, in most countries, U.S. citizens are still allowed to enter. Every European country is handling the crisis differently, so read on to learn the latest travel requirements and lockdown conditions in each.

Austria

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Austria as long as they can show proof of vaccination (within 360 days) or a certificate of recovery confirming that the traveler has recovered from COVID-19 in the past few months. Travelers will also be required to take a PCR test before entry unless they can show proof of a booster shot. Unvaccinated travelers are required to show a negative test result and quarantine for 10 days. Before boarding, all passengers must complete the Pre-Travel-Clearance Form.

The Baltics

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Estonia, Latvia, or Lithuania if they are fully vaccinated. Fully vaccinated travelers may enter any of these three countries for non-essential reasons without needing to quarantine. Unvaccinated travelers may enter Estonia or Latvia if they qualify for an exception, but will need to show a negative test and self-isolate for 10 days.

Belgium

The U.S. is again considered a “red zone” area and U.S. citizens may only enter Belgium with proof of vaccination and a PCR test taken within 72 hours or an antigen test taken within 36 hours. Unvaccinated travelers who qualify for an Essential Travel Certificate must quarantine for seven days. All travelers will be tested upon arrival and vaccinated travelers must self-isolate until a negative result is returned. A follow-up test on day seven is also required.

Bulgaria

The U.S. has been reclassified as a Red Zone country, which means travelers are only allowed to enter Bulgaria if they qualify for an exception. If so, they will be required to provide proof of vaccination, antibodies, or a negative PCR test. There is no requirement to quarantine.

Croatia

Tourists are allowed to enter Croatia, but they will need proof of vaccination (not older than 365 days), antibodies, or a negative PCR or antigen test. Any traveler who enters Croatia without these documents will be tested on arrival and must self-isolate until negative results come back. Travelers can upload their required documents before arrival on the Enter Croatia website.

Czech Republic

U.S. citizens must show a negative PCR test to enter the Czech Republic, regardless of vaccination status. Travelers who can show proof of receiving a booster shot will be exempt from the testing requirement. As of January 1, the government will consider a vaccination valid if the visitor is within nine months of their second dose. However, a booster shot extends the validity of vaccination indefinitely.

All travelers must also fill out a Personal Locator Form. Unvaccinated travelers will be tested on arrival and must self-isolate until negative results are returned.

Denmark

U.S. citizens will need a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours or an antigen test taken within 48 hours to enter Denmark, regardless of vaccination status. Exceptions will be made for children under 15 years old. Unvaccinated travelers will be tested upon arrival and required to self-isolate for 10 days.

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Finland

All travelers entering Finland must present a negative test taken within 48 hours, regardless of vaccination status. Unvaccinated travelers, except for children, are not allowed to enter Finland for tourism.

France

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter France with proof of vaccination, a negative test taken 48 hours before arrival, and a sworn statement they do not have symptoms. Unvaccinated travelers may be allowed to enter if they qualify for an exception, but they must supply a negative test taken within 48 hours and will also be required to quarantine for seven days.

An indoor and outdoor mask mandate is in place and every person in France is required to obtain a health pass to board an airplane or enter cafes, restaurants, and other businesses. For a fee of up to 36 Euros, tourists can obtain a health pass, or Pass Sanitaire, from a French pharmacy or doctor by showing proof of vaccination or a negative test. If showing a negative test, the pass is only good for 72 hours. As of December 15, any person over the age of 65 will need to have received a booster shot (to be taken between three and seven months after their last dose) to keep their health pass active. This rule applies to everyone over 18 years old.

Germany

Vaccinated travelers arriving from the U.S. are allowed to enter Germany as long as they can show proof of vaccination and a negative test taken within 72 hours. Any unvaccinated traveler who qualifies for an exception or any traveler coming from a virus-variant area must quarantine for 14 days, even if they have been vaccinated.

Greece

Greece has opened its doors to U.S. citizens, who will be allowed to enter with proof of vaccination and a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours. All international travelers are subject to random testing upon arrival in Greece and must complete the Passenger Locator Form. If you are selected for random testing, you must self-quarantine at your destination for 24 hours or until you receive a negative test result. Proof of vaccination is required to enter shops and restaurants, including outdoor cafes.

Hungary

U.S. citizens can now enter Hungary with a negative test taken within 72 hours. There is no requirement to quarantine.

Iceland

Only travelers who can prove they have been fully vaccinated are allowed to enter Iceland. Everyone will also need to pre-register their trip and show a negative test taken within 72 hours of departure and will be tested again on arrival, at no extra charge. Unvaccinated travelers who may be allowed to enter Iceland under an exemption will need to provide two negative tests—before and after arrival—and quarantine for at least five days.

Ireland

Vaccinated travelers no longer have to show a negative test to enter Ireland, but unvaccinated travelers must provide a PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival. Before departure, everyone must fill out the Passenger Locator Form. Unvaccinated passengers that arrive without a negative test must quarantine at home and take a PCR test within 36 hours of entering Ireland.

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Italy

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Italy with proof of vaccination (or proof of recovery) and a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours. This will give the traveler a “green pass,” which exempts them from the required 10-day self-isolation. Before traveling to Italy, all passengers must also complete the EU Digital Passport Locator Form.

There are two levels to the green pass. The “basic green pass,” obtained with a negative test, is enough to stay in hotels and use public transportation. However, the “super green pass,” obtained with proof of vaccination, is necessary to dine indoors and visit cultural venues like museums. Until March 31, the super green pass will be necessary to stay in hotels and use public transportation from airplanes to trains and buses.

The Netherlands

Only U.S. citizens who can present proof of vaccination will be allowed to enter. They will also need a negative PCR or antigen test taken within 24 hours. There is no quarantine requirement for those who can show proof of vaccination or a negative test result.

Norway

Norway is allowing some travelers to enter as long as they complete the proper registration and produce proof of vaccination or a negative test taken within 24 hours of arrival. Unvaccinated travelers must get tested upon arrival. A 10-day quarantine is required for any traveler coming from red, dark red, and purple countries unless the individual can provide proof of vaccination. U.S. travelers are now allowed to enter Norway.

Poland

All U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Poland, but proof of vaccination and a negative PCR test taken within 24 hours will be required to enter. Unvaccinated travelers may enter, but in addition to providing a negative test result, they will also have to quarantine for 10 or 14 days depending on whether they are arriving from a Schengen Area country.

Portugal Impacted By Coronavirus

Portugal

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Portugal for tourism if they can show a negative test taken within 72 hours of boarding or proof of vaccination. As of January 10, masks are required indoors and a negative rapid test or proof of vaccination will be required to enter restaurants and check into a hotel. A negative rapid test or proof of receiving a booster shot will also be necessary to enter bars and large events.

Romania

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Romania, but all travelers will be required to present a negative PCR test taken within 48 hours of departure. If no test is presented, fully vaccinated travelers must quarantine for 5 days and unvaccinated travelers must quarantine for 10 days. A green pass proving vaccination will be required to access most businesses in Romania.

Russia

U.S. citizens are now allowed to enter Russia. Everyone traveling to Russia will be required to present a negative PCR test taken within the previous three days of their arrival with no requirement to quarantine.

Serbia

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Serbia with a negative PCR test taken within 48 hours, regardless of vaccination status. However, there’s no need to quarantine.

Spain

U.S. and British citizens can only enter Spain if they can show proof of vaccination. All travelers coming from approved countries are asked to complete a health control form online, which will give them the QR code they will need to show upon entry in Spain in addition to undergoing a health check. No quarantine is required.

Sweden

U.S. citizens may enter Sweden, but they will need to show a negative test taken within 48 hours and proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19. Unvaccinated travelers must qualify for an exception to enter Sweden but there is no quarantine requirement.

Switzerland

U.S. citizens may enter Switzerland if they can show proof of vaccination and a negative PCR test. No quarantine is necessary, but everyone will need to complete a second antigen or PCR test between their fourth and seventh day in Switzerland.

All travelers must also complete the entry form before checking into their flight. Tourists in Switzerland will need to obtain and show a Swiss digital vaccine certificate to enter restaurants, museums, and other businesses.

Turkey

Turkey has reopened its borders to travelers from many countries, including the U.S. All passengers traveling to Turkey will undergo a health exam upon arrival and must provide proof of vaccination. Travelers under the age of 12 will need a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours before departure. Travelers from the UK will need to show a negative test regardless of vaccination status and anyone who has visited a high-risk country like Brazil or South Africa within 14 days before entering Turkey will be required to quarantine for 14 days.

Ukraine

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Ukraine if they can show proof of vaccination or a negative test taken within 72 hours, plus proof of health insurance. Only unvaccinated travelers who do not produce a negative test before entry will be required to quarantine for 10 days.

United Kingdom

All travelers must complete the Passenger Locator Form before departing for the UK. Fully vaccinated travelers may enter the UK without a test, but they will still be required to get tested on arrival by either booking a PCR or antigen test or purchasing an at-home test. They must self-isolate until the results come back negative.

Unvaccinated travelers may be eligible to enter the UK, but they must show a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours before departure self-quarantine for 10 days. They will need to take follow-up tests on the second and eighth days of their quarantine period.

TripSavvy uses only high-quality, trusted sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial policy to learn more about how we keep our content accurate, reliable and trustworthy.

Austrian Embassy. “Travel Information.” December 27, 2021.

U.S. Embassy in Estonia. “ COVID-19 Information.” January 14, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Latvia. “COVID-19 Information.” December 4, 2021.

U.S. Embassy in Lithuania. “COVID-19 Information.” December 30, 2021.

U.S. Embassy in Belgium. “COVID-19 Information.” January 10, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Croatia. “COVID-19 Information.” January 10, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in the Czech Republic. “COVID-19 Information.” January 10, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulate in the Kingdom of Denmark. “COVID-19 Information.” January 14, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Finland. “COVID-19 Information.” January 13, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulates in France. “COVID-19 Information.” January 10, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Germany. “COVID-19 Information.” January 3, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Greece. “COVID-19 Information.” January 7, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Hungary. “COVID-19 Information.” December 6, 2021.

U.S. Embassy in Iceland. “COVID-19 Information.” January 14, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Ireland. “COVID-19 Information.” January 13, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Italy. “COVID-19 Information.” January 14, 2022.

U.S. Embassy and Consulate in the Netherlands. “COVID-19 Information.” December 29, 2021.

Government of Norway. “Travel to Norway.” January 14, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Norway. “COVID-19 Information.” December 13, 2021.

U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Poland. “COVID-19 Information.” January 7, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Romania. “COVID-19 Information.” January 14, 2022.

U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Russia. “COVID-19 Information.” December 6, 2021.

U.S. Embassy in Serbia. “COVID-19 Information.” January 12, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Spain and Andorra. “COVID-19 Information.” December 23, 2021.

U.S. Embassy in Switzerland and Liechtenstein. “COVID-19 Information for Switzerland and Liechtenstein.” January 13, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Turkey. “COVID-19 Information.” January 3, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Ukraine. “COVID-19 Information.” January 4, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulates in the United Kingdom. “COVID-19 Information.” January 7, 2022.

Source https://blog.wego.com/international-reopening/

Source https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/international-trips-2021-pandemic/index.html

Source https://www.tripsavvy.com/europe-travel-border-reopenings-4845817

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