U.S. Travel Documents Requirements: Traveling to and from the USA

If you are planning a trip to or outside the U.S., the first thing you need to make sure is that your travel documents are in order. A travel document is a form of identification issued by a government to ease the movement of individuals across international borders. Before you leave for the airport, you need to make sure that your travel document is valid, and that you have all the necessary extra documentation, including any required visas. There are different types of travel documents that are issued based on immigration status and purpose for the trip. U.S. law requires that every individual, regardless of citizenship, age or destination, needs to hold a valid travel document(s) to travel outside of the United States. Of course, the requirements for crossing international boundaries vary depending on the country of destination. It is paramount when traveling either domestically or internationally to make sure you have the necessary travel documents, required visas, for entering or departing the United States.

Main Travel Documents

It is important to keep in mind that the travel document requirements for traveling outside of the U.S. may not be the same required to enter another country. The main travel documents issued by the U.S. government are passports, U.S. permanent resident card (Green Card), Refugee or Stateless travel document, Re-Entry Permit, and emergency travel document issued by an embassy or consulate. But what are the differences between them?

Passports

The passport is perhaps the most common travel document there is. It is usually issued in a booklet format. It has a biometrics page with the holder’s information and also blank pages for entry and departure stamps and visas. It acts as a form of identification and proof of citizenship. Most countries require that a passport is valid for at least 6 months at the time of arrival.

The governmental entity responsible for issuing passports in the U.S. is the Department of State (DOS). U.S. passports act as proof of U.S. citizenship and allow their holder entry into a total of 156 countries visa-free.

Passport Cards

Both apassport and passport card are considered U.S. passports. They both serve as proof of your U.S. citizenship and identity. The passport card is a wallet-sized travel document that can only be used by U.S. citizens to re-enter the United States at land border-crossings or ports-of-entry by sea from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Bermuda. This card is a smaller, more convenient, and less expensive alternative to the traditional passport, especially for those who frequently travel to these destinations. The passport card, like the passport book, is valid for 10 years for an adult, and five years for children age 16 and younger. If you already have a passport book, then you may apply for the passport card at a reduced price.

USA Travel Documents

Form I-94 and Arrival/Departure Records

Form I-94, Arrival-Departure Record, is used to record traveler’s’ arrival/departure information to the United States. However, CBP now gathers this information automatically from their electronic travel records. All those arriving in the U.S. via air or sea are no longer required to complete Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record. However, if they need the information from their Form I-94 admission record to prove their legal-visitor status, they can access their arrival/departure record information online. Because CBP only collects this information automatically for air and sea travelers, CBP will still issue a paper form I-94 at land border ports of entry.

Visas

To travel to and enter the United States, travelers need a visa. The type of visa you will need to apply for depends on the reason for your visit. You can apply for a visa at a U.S. embassy or consulate in your country of residence. Your approved visa will be placed on directly in your passport. A visa usually comes in either a stamp or loose piece of paper format and shows the purpose of your trip as well as its validity. You cannot enter the U.S. after your visa’s expiration date. At the port of entry, the DHS officer will enter the date when you are required to leave the U.S in your I-94 form. You have an obligation to leave the United States by this date since it is when your immigration status expires, or face not being allowed to re.-enter the U.S. even if you have a valid travel document.

In addition to the traditional visas, the USCIS also issues three types of travel documents for exceptional circumstances. These special travel documents allow their holders to re-enter the U.S. country without having to apply for a visa. To apply for these travel documents, individuals need to complete and file Form I-131, Application for Travel Document and choose which document they want to apply for:

  • An advance parole document
  • A refugee travel document
  • A re-entry permit

All those who applied for asylum or were considered asylees on or after April 1, 1997, can lose their status should they return to the country for which they sought asylum.

Advance Parole

Individuals who are in the process of adjusting their status or applying for an immigrant visa (refugees and asylees) are required to apply for advance parole document. Failure to do so can lead to severe consequences upon returning and trying to enter the United States, as these individuals may be found inadmissible, their applications may be denied, or both. It is paramount for non-U.S. citizens to obtain the proper documentation before leaving the United States. However, there are three exceptions to the requirement for nonimmigrant visa holders to apply for advance parole: H1B, L and K3/4 holders as well as their dependents. Those who hold a K1/2 visa and who have married a U.S. citizen must apply for legal permanent resident (Green Card holder) status and advance parole before leaving the United States, by filing Form I-131.

Non-immigrant visa holders must obtain Advance Parole, before departure, to re-enter the United States if they have:

  • Filed an application for adjustment of status but have not received a decision from the USCIS;
  • Hold refugee or asylee status and intend to depart temporarily to apply for a U.S. immigrant visa in Canada; and/or
  • An emergency or personal reason to travel temporarily abroad.

Refugee Travel Documents

The USCIS grants refugee travel documents to individuals with refugee or asylum status and to lawful permanent residents who obtained their Green Cards based on their refugee or asylee status. If you want to travel abroad, you will need a passport. A refugee travel document is the equivalent of a passport for asylees and refugees who need to travel outside the U.S. temporarily. Before traveling abroad, those who were granted asylum or refugee status must apply for a refugee travel document. Family members who are classified as derivative asylees or refugees must also apply and obtain a refugee travel document before traveling outside of the United States. Failing to get a refugee travel document before leaving the U.S. could have serious consequences like being denied re-entry into the U.S. or even being deported. It is also important to keep in mind that both asylees and refugees you should never travel to the country from which they claimed persecution.

Re-entry Permits

A reentry permit allows a permanent resident (Green Card holder) or conditional resident to apply for re-entry after having spent at least a year outside of the United States. Those who are granted a re-entry permit are not required to apply for a returning resident visa from a U.S. embassy or consulate.

If you are a U.S. lawful permanent resident (green card holder), and you need to spend a year or more outside the United States, you are required to get a re-entry permit to maintain your status. While Green Card holders are allowed to travel, they cannot spend more than an allotted time outside the U.S. running the risk that immigration authorities may consider the act an intent to abandon U.S. residence status. A re-entry permit helps prove that you did not mean to give up your status. A re-entry permit is also useful for when you cannot, or do not wish to, get a passport from your home country. The permit (which looks like a passport) can be used in its place. Remember that you cannot extend the time on your re-entry permit. If it expires, and you want to renew it, you will need to return to the U.S. and apply for a new one.

Emergency Travel

In the case of emergency, and before leaving the United States, the USCIS might process an application for a travel document faster. If you are experiencing an extremely urgent situation, you may visit your local office to request an emergency travel document. You will be required to submit any additional documentation required, including proof of your emergency situation, e.g.; medical documents, death certificates, travel records, etc. It is important to understand that business trips, weddings, holiday parties and other planned events are usually not considered emergency situations. USCIS considers emergency situations to be, life-threatening conditions, a humanitarian situation like a natural catastrophe. Your requested assistance to attend a cultural or social program which would benefit the United States, etc.

So if you are a foreign national planning a trip outside of the U.S., please make sure you have all the appropriate travel documents in order or risk losing their rights and benefits given to you by the U.S. government. Failing to do so may result in being found inadmissible upon your return, or your applications may be denied, or both. That is why it is paramount that the proper documentation is obtained before leaving the United States.

Here Are The Current Travel Restrictions For Americans Traveling To Europe

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Here Are The Current Travel Restrictions For Americans Traveling To Europe

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Americans can still travel to European countries, although each country makes their own decisions about who can enter and what precautions are required to help prevent the spread of Covid-19.

Before deciding to travel to Europe, check the testing and vaccination requirements for your destination. Be sure to also consider any countries you transit as there may be testing or vaccination requirements even if you don’t leave the airport. You’ll also want to travel masks with you at all times, since some forms of transportation as well as public and private businesses may require them to enter. Many European countries specifically call for FFP2 masks (or similar-style masks such as KF94 or N95s).

Here are some of the latest European travel rules and restrictions for U.S. travelers.

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France

U.S. citizens can travel to France with full proof of vaccination , which you may have to show to your airline and to border patrol.

Spain

U.S. citizens are not required to quarantine when arriving in Spain, but proof of vaccination or a recent negative test is required. Your test must be from within 72 hours prior to departure for PCR tests or 24 hours for antigen tests. Spain recently revised their requirements to define fully vaccinated travelers as those who received their final dose 14-270 days prior to arrival. Therefore, some travelers may need to obtain a booster dose prior to travel to Spain.

Before departure, you must complete a Health Control Form (FCS) and obtain and download the QR code to show at boarding and health controls upon arrival in Spain.

Requirements for Traveling to the U.S.

As of June 12, U.S. citizens returning from Europe to the United States no longer need to provide a negative Covid-19 test in order to return home. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lifted the previous mandate that had required travelers to supply a negative Covid test or documentation of recovery in order to re-enter the U.S.

However, if you’re not a U.S. citizen or are on an immigrant visa, you’ll still need to show proof of vaccination to fly to the U.S. from Europe.

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Traveling To Europe: A Complete Country-By-Country Guide For U.S. Visitors

Aerial view of Berlin, Germany skyline in Europe

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Albania

Albania is now open to all foreign travel. According to the U.S. Embassy, tourists must submit a vaccination passport where the date of full vaccination is no later than 2 weeks from the date of entry. Additionally, visitors must have a negative PCR test within 72 hours or a rapid antigen test within 48 hours. Alternatively, visitors may provide documentation from a licensed health care provider of having recovered from COVID-19 in the 6 months preceding travel.

As of March 11, Americans can travel to Albania without any additional restrictions.

Face masks are required for any individual 11 years old and above, wearing a mask outdoors is also mandatory when social distancing is not possible. Additionally, theres is a night time curfew in effect from 12am until 6am.

  • The CDC currently classifies Albania at Level Three: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Albania’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Albania.

Andorra

As of March 13, Andorra no longer requires any COVID-related entry documents. However, all foreigners interested in traveling to the country must cross its borders via one of its neighboring countries, either France or Spain. This means that, while Andorra will not require documents, travelers will be subject to the requirements of either France or Spain.

Wearing a mask is mandatory for all public, indoor locations. Restaurants and businesses across Andorra are open, but many require a COVID certificate or other proof of vaccination in order to enter. While tourists should, as always, double check the guidelines of any anticipated tourist attraction, most locations should be operating and welcoming guests.

  • The CDC currently classifies Andorra at Level Three: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.

Updated March 13.

Armenia

Travelers to Armenia are no longer required to provide documentation of vaccination against COVID-19 or a negative COVID-19 test. There are no health screening procedures at the airports or other ports of entry.

The country has also lifted its mask mandate for indoor venues.

  • The CDC currently classifies Armenia at Level One: A Low Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Albania’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Armenia.

Austria

Travelers from all countries, including the United States, can visit Austria, and proof of vaccination, recovery or a test is no longer needed.

Businesses throughout the country are open, and there is no longer a curfew placed on restaurants and bars. Mask mandates have loosened, and masks are no longer required when using public transportation, except for Vienna. In Vienna FFP2 masks are required in pharmacies and all forms of public transportations. Children under 6 are exempt, while those from 6 to 13 can wear a regular mask.

  • The CDC currently classifies Austria at Level Three: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Albania’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the country’s COVID-19 page.

Azerbaijan

Travel to Azerbaijan is currently open to travelers from a list of approved countries, and only via Azerbaijan Airlines. The updating list of permitted countries of origin is available here. As of March 13, the United States is considered a permitted country.

Beginning April 15, 2022, the need for a negative PCR test for entry to Azerbaijan was eliminated, according to The Cabinet of Ministers.

Effective May 1, 2022, masks are no longer required.

  • The CDC currently classifies Azerbaijan at Level One: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Azerbaijan’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Azerbaijan.

Belarus

The borders of Belarus have reopened, but only partially. With very few exceptions, all travelers must exclusively enter through the Minsk National Airport, since almost all land border crossings are prohibited.

The U.S. Department of State issued a Do Not Travel ordinance that prohibits the sale of airline tickets destined for Belarus to all U.S. residents. This safety measure is due to both Belarus’s COVID-19 ordinances and political actions of the country.

  • The CDC currently classifies Belarus at Level Three: A High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Belarus’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, visit the U.S. Embassy in Belarus.

Reviewed June 3.

Belgium

As of May 23, 2022, travel to Belgium for U.S. citizens is permitted. There is no testing or quarantine requirement or a need to present a Passenger Locator Form or valid vaccination, recovery, or test certificate.

Masks, currently required for most indoor venues, will only be mandatory on public transport and in hospitals and care homes. Capacity limits on indoor venues will also be lifted.

  • The CDC currently classifies Belgium at Level Three: A High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Belgium’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Belgium.

Bosnia And Herzegovina

Travel to Bosnia and Herzegovina is permitted to all foreigners, so long as a traveler can provide one of three document options: a negative COVID-19 test from within 72 hours prior to arrival (48 hours if coming from Europe), a COVID-19 vaccination certificate, or a doctor’s certificate of COVID-19 recovery. As of March 13, American travelers can enter Bosnia and Herzegovina and will be asked to provide one of these three documents.

The country’s public attractions and restaurants are open and operating, but follow all rules concerning mask-wearing, social distancing, and gathering capacity limitations. Exact guidelines are dependent on local ordinances.

  • The CDC currently classifies Bosnia and Herzegovina at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Date reviewed: March 13

Bulgaria

Bulgaria classifies countries into green, orange, red, and dark red zones, and entry requirements will differ depending on a traveler’s country of origin. In order to enter the country, travelers from green, orange, and red zones must present proof of vaccination, a recent negative test, or recent proof of recovery.

Bulgaria’s updating list of country classifications is available here. As of March 13, the United States is classified as an orange zone. Because of this, Americans traveling to Bulgaria must bring one of the three valid documents to present upon arrival. If a traveler is unable to present any of these documents, they will be asked to quarantine for several days.

Masks are required at all indoor public places, as well as outdoor public spaces where social distancing is not possible. All of Bulgaria’s famous attractions, including its beaches, cathedrals, and monuments, are open but operate with social distancing and mask mandates. As of October 21, all adults in public indoor spaces are required to provide proof of vaccination, recent recovery, or a negative test result.

  • The CDC currently classifies Bulgaria at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Bulgaria’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Bulgaria.

Updated March 13.

Croatia

Croatia has eliminated all COVID-19-related entry requirements, and travelers can visit without any testing, vaccination or quarantine rules. According to the Croatian National Tourist Board, entry is “subject to the conditions of entry valid before the COVID 19 epidemic.”

Croatia’s restaurants, shops, and beautiful national parks are all open and operating. , Masks are not required on public transportation or indoor entertainment venues. They are however required at a doctor’s office, in medical clinics and hospitals, or if visiting a nursing home.

  • The CDC currently classifies Croatia at Level Three: A High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Croatia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, visit the U.S. Embassy in Croatia.

Date updated June 3.

Cyprus

Cyprus classifies all countries as green, orange, and red, and entrance requirements vary depending on a traveler’s country of origin. Prior to arrival, all travelers must fill out a Cyprus Flight Pass.

A regularly updated list of permitted travelers is available here. As of April 11, the United States — along with almost every other country in the world — is classified as a red zone. This means that all travelers must obtain a CyprusFlightPass with either proof of vaccination, recent recovery, or a recent negative test within 48 hours prior to boarding their flight.

Many institutions in Cyprus require a SafePass — a document proving an individual’s vaccination or recent negative test — in order to enter institutions that hold more than 25 people. For tourists, a CyprusFlightPass can function in place of a SafePass, and allow entrance into the restaurants, shops, and museums across the country.

  • The CDC currently classifies Cyprus at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Cyprus’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, visit the U.S. Embassy in Cyprus.

Updated April 11.

Czechia

For all travelers interested in entering Czechia, proof of vaccination or a medical certificate proving recent recovery will grant access to the country. If more than 9 months have passed since the initial vaccine, a booster shot is also required. For unvaccinated travelers, those from low- and medium-risk countries must provide a negative test, either before or after arrival. Any unvaccinated travelers arriving from countries classified as high or very high risk must provide a negative test, quarantine, and then pass a second test.

A regularly updated list of country classifications is available here. As of March 13, the United States is classified as a very high-risk country. Because of this, vaccinated Americans or recently recovered Americans can provide their proof of vaccination or certificate of recovery as valid entry documents. Meanwhile, unvaccinated Americans can only travel for essential purposes.

Across the country, museums, hotels, and public venues require either a recent negative COVID test or a proof of vaccination in order to enter. While not common for all businesses, other types of establishments may also ask the same. Mask mandates and social distancing guidelines are present throughout Czechia.

  • The CDC currently classifies Czechia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Czechia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Czechia.

Updated March 13.

Denmark

Denmark is open to all travelers. The country has no COVID-related entry requirements.

Denmark’s restaurants, shops, and tourist attractions are open, welcoming tourists and locals alike. Masks, social distancing, and proof of vaccination are no longer required by law, but some institutions (especially medical facilities, elder care facilities, and public transportation) still require them.

  • The CDC currently classifies Denmark at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Denmark’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Denmark.

Updated April 6.

Estonia

The borders of Estonia are open to all vaccinated travelers, regardless of their country of origin, with no additional testing or quarantining requirements. Unvaccinated travelers may also enter the country, but their required entry documents depend on their country of origin.

Prior to entering Estonia, all travelers are required to fill out a declaration of health. As of March 13, vaccinated Americans should bring with them proof of vaccination, while unvaccinated Americans should provide a negative test and plan on quarantining for several days.

Estonia’s restaurants, shops, museums, and tourist attractions are all open, but most require a Digital COVID Certificate upon entry, which assures an institution that someone is fully vaccinated. Masks are required in all indoor public locations.

  • The CDC currently classifies Estonia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Estonia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Estonia.

Date reviewed: March 13

Finland

Finland has a complex series of rules for crossing the border, depending on a traveler’s country of origin, but the rule across the board is that any fully vaccinated traveler is allowed to enter the country. Regardless of home country, a traveler will need to provide proof of vaccination in order to enter Finland.

If an unvaccinated traveler is coming from the EU and Schengen countries, or an area with “normal cross-border traffic,” they are still able to travel to Finland. Meanwhile, unvaccinated travelers from all other countries — including the United States — are banned from entering the country for anything other than essential travel. A full breakdown of country-by-country restrictions is available on the Finnish Border Guard website.

This means that, as of March 13, vaccinated Americans should travel with proof of vaccination, while unvaccinated Americans will not be allowed to travel to Finland for non-essential reasons.

The popular castles, cathedrals, and bustling cities of Finland are once again open to tourists, as well as the country’s shops and restaurants. All businesses have some form of social distancing, and mask requirements are dependent on local guidelines. Many businesses require proof of vaccination for entry.

  • The CDC currently classifies Finland at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Finland’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Finland.

Updated March 13.

France

The borders of France are open to all vaccinated travelers. Requirements to enter are proof of full vaccination and a sworn declaration stating the traveler has no symptoms and has not been in contact with a confirmed case in the past two weeks. If more than 9 months have passed since the initial vaccine, a booster shot is also required.

France keeps an updating list of green, orange, and red countries, and unvaccinated travelers (with a recent negative test) can only enter the country for leisure and travel purposes if coming from a country in the green zone. Unvaccinated travelers from orange and red zones are banned from entry unless they have “pressing ground to travel.” An updating list of country classifications is available here.

As of March 15, the United States is considered a green country, meaning vaccinated travelers should bring proof of vaccination (and booster, if applicable), while unvaccinated travelers must show a recent negative COVID test (48 hours for a rapid antigen test; 72 hours for a PCR test) or proof of recovery within the past 6 months.

France’s iconic tourist landmarks, including its restaurants, shops, museums, and cafés, are all open and no longer require a French Vaccine Pass, which assures an institution that someone is fully vaccinated, upon entry. The passes will still be required to enter hospitals and nursing homes.

  • The CDC currently classifies France at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of France’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in France.

Updated March 15.

Georgia

Travelers from all countries can enter Georgia, regardless of vaccination status. Vaccinated travelers can present proof of vaccination as an entry document, while unvaccinated travelers can present a negative test from within 72 hours of arrival. Required documents no longer vary depending on entry route, meaning necessary documents are consistent throughout the country.

This means that, as of March 13, all Americans are permitted to travel to Georgia with either a recent negative test or proof of vaccination as an entry document. That said, the state department has issued a Do Not Travel warning for the Russian-occupied regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia due to unrest.

Georgia has discontinued its Green Pass System, which required proof of vaccination or a negative test to gain access to most businesses and restaurants.

  • The CDC currently classifies Georgia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Georgia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, visit the U.S. Embassy in Georgia.
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Updated March 13.

Germany

Germany is open to most travelers, depending on their country of origin. Those permitted to enter the country must be able to provide either proof of vaccination or a medical recovery certificate. Any unvaccinated travelers from “high-risk” countries can only enter for essential purposes, and will have to quarantine for 10 days, while all travelers coming from a “virus-variant area,” regardless of vaccination status, can only travel for essential purposes and must quarantine for 14 days after arrival.

A continuously updated list of country classifications is available here. As of March 13, the United States is no longer considered a “high-risk” country. This means that all vaccinated Americans are able to travel to Germany with either proof of vaccination or a recovery certificate, with no additional requirements upon arrival. Unvaccinated Americans cannot travel to Germany for tourism purposes.

Germany’s popular tourist destinations and its local restaurants and shops are all open, but operate under various mask mandates and gathering limitations. Many businesses require patrons to provide proof of vaccination or recent recovery.

  • The CDC currently classifies Germany at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Germany’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Germany.

Updated March 13.

Greece

The borders of Greece are fully open, but requirements vary depending on a traveler’s country of origin. In order to enter the country, all travelers must provide proof of vaccination, while travelers outside of EU and Schengen countries must also provide a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of arrival. If more than 9 months have passed since the initial vaccination, fully vaccinated travelers will need proof of a booster shot. All passengers are subject to additional randomized health screenings.

A continuously updated list of Greece’s country-by-country entry requirements is available here. As of March 13, all vaccinated American travelers can enter Greece but will be asked to provide both proof of vaccination and a recent negative test.

Popular tourist attractions are open, but operate with capacity limitations, while restaurants, cafés, and nightclubs require proof of vaccination or medical recovery certificates at entry. The country continues to require masks in all indoor public areas, but not at uncrowded outdoor events.

  • The CDC currently classifies Greece at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Greece’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, visit the U.S. Embassy in Greece.

Updated March 13.

Hungary

Hungary is open to all travelers. On March 7, the country dropped all COVID-related restrictions upon entry.

Hungary’s popular tourist destinations and its local restaurants and shops are all open, and masks are only required in social and healthcare institutions.

  • The CDC currently classifies Hungary at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Hungary’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Hungary.

Updated March 29.

Iceland

On February 25, Iceland officially dropped all COVID-related entry requirements. This means travelers do not have to undergo any testing, provide proof of vaccination, or quarantine.

In addition to loosening requirements at the border, the rest of the country has dropped all mask mandates and social distancing guidelines. While some individual businesses may enact their own policies, there are no longer any country-wide official COVID prevention measures.

  • The CDC currently classifies Iceland at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Iceland’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Iceland.

Updated March 13.

Ireland

On March 6, Ireland officially dropped all COVID-related entry requirements. This means travelers do not have to undergo any testing, provide proof of vaccination, or quarantine. The country also no longer requires travelers to complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

Irish restaurants, shops, museums, and other tourist attractions are open but are subject to mask mandates, social distancing rules, and capacity limits. In January, the country dropped all restaurant and bar curfews.

  • The CDC currently classifies Ireland at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Ireland’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Ireland.

Updated March 13.

Italy

On June 1, Italy lifted all COVID-19-related entry requirements. Travelers may visit the country without proof of vaccinations, tests or proof of recovery. Additionally the Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced that a Green Pass, or equivalent is no longer needed to enter the country.

While the EU recently decided to drop mask mandates, Italy will still require masks to be worn on all public transportation, at indoor performances in theaters, cinemas, indoor sporting events and other indoor entertainment venues until at least June 15.

  • The CDC currently classifies Italy at Level Three: A High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Italy’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Italy.

Kazakhstan

As of now, the borders to Kazakhstan remain almost entirely closed off from tourists. For a comprehensive list of the few exceptions to this rule, trips that would be classified as essential travel can be found here. These restrictions will remain in place indefinitely until rescinded by the Kazakhstan government.

  • The CDC currently classifies Kazakhstan as unknown and does not recommend travel.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Kazakhstan’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Kazakhstan.

Updated March 13.

Kosovo

While Kosovo’s borders are open for travelers, international flights to and from the country remain limited. Travelers should be aware that many countries will not offer direct flights to Kosovo.

Entry requirements depend on a traveler’s vaccination status. Fully vaccinated travelers can present proof of vaccination upon entry, while partially vaccinated individuals should present both proof of vaccination and a recent negative test. If more than 12 months have passed since the initial vaccination, fully vaccinated travelers will need proof of a booster shot. Unvaccinated travelers can provide either a certificate of recent recovery or a negative test no older than 48 hours. This means that, as of March 13, both vaccinated and unvaccinated Americans can travel to Kosovo for tourism purposes.

Wearing a mask is required in almost all public settings, with few exceptions. Other social distancing and capacity limitations are in place throughout businesses.

  • The CDC currently classifies Kosovo at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Kosovo’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Kosovo.

Updated March 13.

Latvia

Travel to Latvia is open to travelers from a select list of countries. Latvia welcomes all individuals from the EU, EEA, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and an updating list of countries, available here, considered “low risk.” The country also welcomes vaccinated travelers from “high risk” countries. As of March 13, the United States is a “high risk” country, meaning that only vaccinated Americans can travel to Latvia for tourism purposes.

In order to enter Latvia, vaccinated travelers must provide a U.S. CDC vaccine card, a digital EU certificate, or proof of vaccination issued in the EU, the EEA countries, Switzerland, or the UK.

Most businesses, including restaurants, museums, and other tourist attractions, require customers to present proof of vaccination or a recent recovery in order to enter. Mask mandates are dependent on local ordinances and business requirements.

  • The CDC currently classifies Latvia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Latvia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Latvia.

Updated March 13.

Liechtenstein

A traveler’s ability to enter Liechtenstein is dependent on the regulations of its neighboring country, Switzerland. Entry requirements and regulations are the same for both.

All countries are classified as those with a variant of concern, and those without. A list of country classifications is available here. As of March 13, the United States is not classified as a country with a variant of concern.

All travelers entering from a country without a variant of concern must provide proof of vaccination or a medical certificate of recovery. There are no quarantine requirements. Currently, unvaccinated travelers are not permitted to enter the country for tourism purposes. As of March 13, vaccinated American travelers can enter Liechtenstein upon presenting a recent negative test and one of the two document options.

Restaurants, businesses, and transportation are all open in Liechtenstein, with mask mandates, social distancing guidelines, and capacity limitations dependent on businesses and local ordinances.

  • The CDC currently classifies Liechtenstein at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Liechtenstein’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Liechtenstein.

Updated March 13.

Lithuania

Travel to Lithuania is open to all countries, but requirements vary depending on a traveler’s country of origin. As of February 15, 2022, all travelers from European Union countries (plus Iceland, Liechtenstein, and Norway) no longer have to provide proof of vaccination, a document of recovery, or a negative test.

Travelers from all other countries are required to fill out a National Public Health Center questionnaire prior to arrival. They must also provide one of three documents: proof of complete vaccination (with booster if the vaccination was taken more than 9 months prior), a negative PCR COVID test no older than 72 hours, or a medical certificate of recovery.

Lithuania has a mask mandate requiring face coverings in all indoor public spaces. While restaurants, shops, and museums are open, most are operating under stricter capacity limitations and safety mandates.

  • The CDC currently classifies Lithuania at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Lithuania’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Lithuania.

Updated March 13.

Luxembourg

The borders of Luxembourg are open to all travelers from the EU and a list of approved countries, available here. Vaccinated travelers from an additional list of countries are also permitted to enter. As of March 13, vaccinated travelers from the United States are permitted to enter Luxembourg.

While some travelers can show a recent negative test to gain entry, American travelers must instead provide proof of complete vaccination or a medical certificate of recovery upon entry. This means that unvaccinated Americans cannot travel to Luxembourg for tourism purposes.

Restaurants, museums, and most public spaces require proof of vaccination or recent recovery to enter. Most locations will not permit unvaccinated individuals. Masks remain mandatory in most public spaces, with exceptions for markets and shopping centers.

  • The CDC currently classifies Luxembourg at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Luxembourg’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Luxembourg.

Date reviewed: March 13

Malta

Travel to Malta is open only to vaccinated travelers from a select list of countries. If a traveler arrives without sufficient proof of vaccination, they will be required to quarantine for two weeks. If more than 3 months have passed since the initial vaccine, a booster shot is also required.

Individuals from countries classified as a “dark red zone” are not allowed to enter Malta for leisure or tourism reasons. A continuously updated list of region classifications is available here. As of March 13, the United States is not on this list. Because of this, vaccinated Americans are permitted to travel to Malta, and must bring their proof of vaccination with them as an entry document. There are no other entry document options.

Most shops, museums, and tourist attractions across Malta are open, but mass gatherings remain banned indefinitely. Masks are required across the country in all public places, including outdoor locations, regardless of vaccination status. While not the case for all restaurants, some will only seat those who can provide proof of vaccination.

  • The CDC currently classifies Malta at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Malta’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Malta.

Updated March 13.

Moldova

Travel to Moldova is open to tourists from all countries, provided they can show proof of vaccination, a medical certificate of recovery, or a negative COVID test taken 72 hours or fewer before arrival. If a traveler has none of these documents, they will be required to quarantine for two weeks. As of March 13, American travelers can enter Moldova and will be asked to provide one of these three documents.

Businesses are open, but most require either proof of vaccination or a recent negative test in order to enter. The country has a mask mandate for all indoor public places, while some local ordinances have an additional mask requirement for outdoor events.

  • The CDC currently classifies Moldova at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Moldova’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Moldova.

Updated March 13.

Monaco

All tourists are welcome to visit Monaco, provided that they can show either proof of vaccination or a medical certificate of recovery. Travelers from “green zones” may opt to present a recent negative COVID test instead. Tourists from either the “orange zone” or the “red zone” are not permitted to use a negative test as an entry document, and can instead only use the vaccine or recovery certificate. A regularly updated list of country classifications is available here.

As of March 13, the United States is considered an “orange zone.” This means Americans can enter Monaco with either proof of vaccination or a certificate of recovery. A recent negative test is not sufficient for American travelers.

While Monaco’s mask mandates and social distancing measures vary by establishment, all restaurants, businesses, and tourist attractions are open, welcoming both tourists and locals. A breakdown of rules by establishment is available here.

  • The CDC currently classifies Monaco at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.

Updated March 13.

Montenegro

Travel to Montenegro is open to tourists from all countries, provided they can show proof of vaccination, a medical certificate of recovery, or a negative COVID test taken no longer than 72 hours before arrival. If a traveler has none of these documents, they will be required to quarantine for two weeks. As of March 13, American travelers can enter Montenegro upon presenting one of these three documents.

Many restaurants, museums, and other businesses require some proof of vaccination, a recent negative test, or a medical certificate of recovery in order to enter the establishment. Masks are required in all indoor public spaces, as well as any outdoor events where social distancing is not possible.

  • The CDC currently classifies Montenegro at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Montenegro’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Montenegro.

Updated March 13.

Netherlands

The borders of the Netherlands are partially open, welcoming tourists from the EU/Schengen area as well other countries deemed safe. Travelers from other countries are welcome if they fit into certain exemption categories from the Netherlands’ EU entry ban.

As of March 24, the U.S. is not considered a safe country. Travelers from the U.S. are only able to enter the Netherlands if they are fully vaccinated, have recently recovered from COVID-19, or meet other narrow exemption categories. Fully vaccinated and recently recovered visitors must fill out a health declaration form and provide proof of a booked trip home.

While masks remain mandatory in airports and on planes, all other businesses enforce their own mask-wearing policies.

  • The CDC currently classifies the Netherlands at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of the Netherlands’ COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the Netherlands’ official site and the U.S. Embassy in the Netherlands.

Updated March 24.

North Macedonia

Travel to North Macedonia is permitted to all foreigners, so long as a traveler can provide one of three document options: a negative COVID test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival, a vaccination certificate, or a doctor’s certificate of recovery. As of March 13, American travelers can enter North Macedonia and will be asked to provide one of these three documents.

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Masks are still required in all indoor public spaces, as well as any outdoor events where social distancing is not possible. Restaurants, museums, and tourist attractions are all open but operate under social distancing guidelines and capacity limitations.

  • The CDC currently classifies North Macedonia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of North Macedonia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in North Macedonia.

Updated March 13.

Norway

On February 12, Norway officially dropped all COVID-related entry requirements. This means travelers do not have to undergo any testing, provide proof of vaccination, or quarantine.

In addition to eliminating all remaining entry requirements, the country has dropped all mask mandates and social distancing guidelines. While some individual businesses may enact their own policies, there are no longer any country-wide official COVID prevention measures.

  • The CDC currently classifies Norway at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Norway’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Norway.

Updated March 13.

Poland

The borders of Poland are partially open, welcoming tourists from EU and Schengen countries, as well as other countries deemed safe. All travelers from outside the Schengen area must provide a recent negative COVID test, regardless of vaccination status. If unvaccinated, travelers will have to quarantine for several days. Travelers can provide either proof of vaccination or a medical certificate of recovery to bypass any quarantine requirements.

A list of approved countries is available here. As of March 13, the United States is considered an approved country. This means Americans are permitted to travel to Poland but must bring a recent negative test and either proof of vaccination or a recovery certificate. If unvaccinated or unable to provide either document, American travelers will be asked to quarantine for several days.

Masks are required in all indoor public locations. Restaurants, hotels, museums, parks, and tourist attractions are open.

  • The CDC currently classifies Poland at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Poland’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Poland.

Updated March 13.

Portugal

Travel to Portugal is open to most foreigners, so long as they can provide either an EU Digital Vaccination Certificate or a recent negative COVID test. All travelers must also fill out a SEF Registration Form prior to entry. A regularly updated list of permitted countries of origin is available here.

As of March 13, the United States is an approved country. This means all American travelers should plan on filling out the registration form and providing a recent negative test as their entry document. All travelers must present a recent negative test, regardless of vaccination status.

Masks are required in indoor public spaces, as well as any outdoor events where social distancing is not possible. Many hotels, restaurants, and businesses will require either an EU Digital Vaccination Certificate or a negative test in order to enter. Shops, museums, and tourist attractions are all open to the public.

  • The CDC currently classifies Portugal at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Portugal’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Portugal.

Date reviewed: March 13

Romania

Non-essential travel to Romania is available to almost all fully vaccinated foreigners. In order to enter the country, a traveler must present either a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing full vaccination completion or a medical certificate of recent COVID-19 recovery, along with a negative test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival.

If a traveler is not able to provide any of these documents, they will be required to quarantine for fourteen days. If an unvaccinated traveler can provide only the negative test, they must quarantine for 10 days. Exact quarantine requirements are dependent on a traveler’s country of origin.

As of March 13, Americans can travel to Romania but must bring either proof of vaccination or a recovery certificate as an entry document, in addition to a negative test. If they cannot provide these documents, American travelers will be expected to quarantine.

There is a nationwide curfew from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. While some non-essential businesses remain closed, most have reopened, hosting guests so long as they follow safety measures. Mask mandates, social distancing guidelines, and capacity limitations are dependent on businesses and local ordinances. Many locations require a Green Pass, signifying complete vaccination, upon entry.

  • The CDC currently classifies Romania at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Romania’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Romania.

Updated March 13.

Russia

Non-essential travel to Russia is limited only to travelers from certain countries. As of March 13, the United States is included on the list, meaning that Americans can now travel to Russia for tourism purposes. All tourists permitted to enter the country must fill out this form and provide a negative COVID test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival.

Masks are required in all indoor public locations. Restaurants, museums, and tourist attractions are open, operating with social distancing, capacity limitations, and other health safety measures. Some locations require proof of vaccination upon entry.

The U.S. currently has a Do Not Travel advisory for Russia, advising all U.S. residents in the country to leave.

  • The CDC currently classifies Russia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Russia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Russia.

Date reviewed: March 13

San Marino

On June 3, 2021, San Marino began allowing movement across its Italian border. The Italian border remains the only entry point into the country, meaning all tourists interested in traveling to San Marino must also review Italy’s entry requirements. San Marino has no additional document, testing, or quarantine requirements of its own.

As of March 13, Americans can travel to Italy — and to San Marino — by providing a recent negative test, proof of vaccination, or a recent recovery certificate as an entry document.

The country continues to maintain mask mandates and strict social distancing guidelines, but all museums, restaurants, and tourist attractions are open and welcoming visitors.

  • The CDC currently classifies San Marino at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.

Updated March 13.

Serbia

Serbia has opened its borders for all foreigners, so long as they can provide one of three documents: proof of complete vaccination, a negative COVID test taken 48 or fewer hours prior to arrival, or a medical certificate of recovery. A short list of countries, available here, are deemed special risk and require additional documentation upon arrival.

As of March 13, the United States is not on that list. Because of this, Americans traveling to Serbia must bring a recent negative test, proof of vaccination, or a certificate of recovery as their entry document.

The country’s public attractions and restaurants are open and operating, but follow all rules concerning mask wearing, social distancing, and gathering limitations. Exact guidelines are dependent on local ordinances. All indoor dining must close by 1 a.m.

  • The CDC currently classifies Serbia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Serbia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Serbia.

Date reviewed: March 13

Slovakia

Slovakia categorizes all travelers into two categories: the fully vaccinated and the unvaccinated, and each group has its own entry requirements.

Both groups must register here prior to arrival. Fully vaccinated travelers are classified as either those who have received or those with a medical recovery certificate. If more than 9 months have passed since the initial vaccination, fully vaccinated travelers will need proof of a booster shot. These travelers are exempt from any quarantine upon arrival. Unvaccinated travelers, meanwhile, will be required to quarantine for 5 days or until they undergo a test and receive a negative result.

As of March 13, Americans can travel to Slovakia with proof of vaccination or a recovery certificate as their entry document, in addition to a recent negative test. Unvaccinated Americans cannot travel for non-essential reasons.

Masks remain mandatory in all public indoor spaces. Most restaurants, museums, and shops are operating under social distancing guidelines and capacity limitations. Some locations may require proof of vaccination or a negative test in order to enter an establishment.

  • The CDC currently classifies Slovakia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Slovakia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Slovakia.

Updated March 13.

Slovenia

On February 21, Slovenia officially dropped all COVID-related entry requirements. This means travelers do not have to undergo any testing, provide proof of vaccination, or quarantine.

In addition to eliminating all remaining entry requirements, the country has dropped all mask mandates and social distancing guidelines. While some individual businesses may enact their own policies, there are no longer any country-wide official COVID prevention measures.

  • The CDC currently classifies Slovenia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Slovenia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Slovenia.

Date reviewed: March 13

Spain

Travelers to Spain must show proof of vaccination or proof they contracted COVID-19 and recovered within 6 months. Children under 12 are exempt from showing any vaccination or test certificates.

As of May 21, 2022, unvaccinated travelers will be allowed to enter the country with proof of a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of their departure, or a negative rapid antigen test taken within 24 hours of their departure.

Travelers without an EU Digital COVID certificate, must complete the SpTH Health Control Form.

It is no longer mandatory to wear a mask indoors or outdoors with a few exceptions. Masks are required on public transportation, and in healthcare settings.

  • The CDC currently classifies Spain at Level Thre: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Spain’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Spain.

Sweden

Sweden is currently open to tourists from all countries. There are no COVID-related entry requirements. The country’s normal entry requirements, like the obligation to apply for a visa if you’re staying for fewer than 90 days, still apply.

Restaurants, businesses, transportation, and tourist attractions are all open in Sweden. In February, Sweden officially dropped all capacity limits, social distancing guidelines, and mask mandates.

  • The CDC currently classifies Sweden a Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Sweden’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Sweden.

Updated April 6.

Switzerland

On February 17, Switzerland lifted many of its COVID-related guidelines, but entry requirements stayed the same. This means that all travelers are required to provide proof of vaccination or a medical certificate of recovery. Currently, unvaccinated Americans cannot travel to Switzerland for non-essential purposes.

Whil entry requirements can change depending on a traveler’s country of origin, no countries are currently classified as containing a “variant of concern.”

Masks remain mandatory only on public transport and in healthcare facilities. Restaurants, businesses, and tourist attractions are open, welcoming both tourists and locals.

  • The CDC currently classifies Switzerland at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Switzerland’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Switzerland.

Updated March 13.

Türkiye (Turkey)

Travel across Türkiye‘s borders is permitted to almost everyone, with a select few exceptions. Prior to arrival, all travelers must fill out an online form. Upon arrival, tourists must present proof of vaccination, a medical recovery certificate, or a negative COVID test.

Travelers from a short list of high-risk countries, available here, will have to submit to additional testing and quarantine regulations. As of March 13, the United States is not included on the list. This means Americans can travel to Türkiye as long as they can provide proof of vaccination, a recent negative test, or a recovery certificate.

Restaurants and businesses across Türkiye are open, and the country no longer requires masks indoors, as long as social distancing is possible. Tourists should, as always, double check the guidelines of any anticipated tourist attraction, but most should be operating and welcoming guests. Almost all forms of public transportation, as well as some businesses, require proof of vaccination or a recent negative test.

  • The CDC currently classifies Turkey at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Turkey’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Turkey.

Date reviewed: March 13

Ukraine

Travel to Ukraine is open to tourists from all countries, provided they can show proof of vaccination, a medical certificate of recovery, or a negative COVID test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. Additionally, Ukraine requires travelers to show proof of medical insurance that would cover any necessary treatment for COVID. Unvaccinated travelers will have to undergo another test upon arrival and quarantine while awaiting results.

Travelers from a short list of countries will be required to quarantine for two weeks, with no exceptions. The list, available here, currently does not include the United States. This means that, as of March 13, all Americans can travel to Ukraine as long as they can provide proof of vaccination, a recent negative test, or a recovery certificate, as well as proof of medical insurance.

Most businesses and restaurants have reopened, hosting guests so long as they maintain social distancing precautions. Masks remain mandatory across the country.

Due to the ongoing war in Ukraine, the U.S. currently has a Do Not Travel advisory for the country, advising all U.S. residents in the country to leave. The U.S. Embassy of Kyiv has suspended all operations until further notice.

  • The CDC currently classifies Ukraine at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Ukraine’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, visit the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine.

Updated March 13.

United Kingdom

Travel to the United Kingdom is open to tourists throughout the world, regardless of vaccination status. Visitors no longer need to complete a passenger locator form, submit a negative COVID test, or quarantine upon arrival.

In the past, Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Wales have operated under different requirements, but as of March 21, all locations have the same entry process.

In the U.K., all restaurants, businesses, and tourist attractions are open, welcoming both tourists and locals. Besides in Northern Ireland, where mask-wearing isn’t legally enforced, face coverings are mandatory on most modes of public transportation and in shops. In the London Tube, masks aren’t mandatory but are “strongly encouraged.”

  • The CDC currently classifies the United Kingdom at Level Three: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of the United Kingdom’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in the United Kingdom.

Reviewed June 3.

Madalena Robertson is a Seattle native who has lived all across the United States, currently calling Las Vegas home. She is a communications expert who has worked on presidential campaigns and is pursuing a graduate certificate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Her travels have taken her to London, Costa Rica, and Canada, as well as all across the United States.

Source https://www.usimmigration.org/articles/u-s-travel-documents-requirements-traveling-to-and-from-the-usa

Source https://www.forbes.com/advisor/travel-insurance/travel-restrictions-us-europe/

Source https://www.travelawaits.com/2662387/can-americans-travel-to-europe-covid-travel-restrictions/

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