Travel during the coronavirus pandemic

To slow down the spread of coronavirus and protect the health and well-being of all Europeans, some travel restrictions have been necessary. The European Commission is doing its utmost to allow people to meet friends and family, travel for work and to ensure free movement of citizens, goods and services – with full respect of health and safety measures.

The Commission has launched initiatives to help citizens travel safely across Europe:

Re-open EU

Find up-to-date information on the travel and health situation for European countries.

EU Digital COVID Certificate

Learn more about the travel certificates that will facilitate free movement in the EU.

Mobile contact tracing apps

Find out how you can help can help break the chain of coronavirus infections through contact tracing apps.

A common approach to travel measures in the EU

On 13 October 2020, EU Member States adopted a Council Recommendation on a coordinated approach to the restriction of free movement in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Recommendation was updated on 1 February 2021,14 June 2021, and 25 January 2022.

Common passenger locator form

Data exchange between Member States’ contact tracing authorities can be particularly important when travellers are crossing borders in close proximity to each other, such as in airplanes or trains. Digital Passenger Locator Forms can be used by Member States to collect data from cross-border travellers entering their territory. In order for Member States to exchange relevant data through the exchange platform developed by the Commission and the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), the Commission published draft measures on 17 March 2021, which establish the necessary legal conditions for processing such personal data.

Passenger and traveller rights

Travel during the pandemic FAQ

Passenger rights

Passenger travel guidance on health safety

Under EU rules, passengers and travellers have the right to choose between vouchers or cash reimbursement for cancelled transport tickets (plane, train, bus/coach and ferries) or package travel. While reaffirming this right, the Commission recommendation of 13 May 2020 aims to ensure that vouchers become a viable and more attractive alternative to reimbursement for cancelled trips in the context of the current pandemic, which has also put heavy financial strains on travel operators.

You can check the list of all the national authorities in Europe that issue travel advice:

Travel from non-EU countries to the EU

EU members have agreed on a common approach to travel from non-EU countries to the European Union as set in a Council recommendation. On 22 February 2022, the Council updated the recommendation to further facilitate travel from outside the EU into the EU. Member States agreed to apply these updates as of 1 March 2022.

EU citizens and residents, their family members as well as those who have an essential reason to come to Europe should continue to be able to do so.

On 2 March 2022, the Commission proposed to activate the Temporary Protection Directive to offer quick and effective assistance to people fleeing Ukraine. The Commission also adopted operational guidelines to help Member States’ border guards efficiently manage arrivals from Ukraine. Member States are encouraged to facilitate border crossings at the EU-Ukraine border, including for persons who are not sufficiently documented (e.g. do not have testing, vaccination and, or recovery certificates).

According to the Council Recommendation on travel to the EU during the pandemic, all requirements prior to arrival to the European Union should be waived for people fleeing war zones.

Vaccinated and recovered persons

EU countries should lift the temporary restriction on non-essential travel to the EU for persons vaccinated with an EU-authorised or a WHO-approved vaccine, provided they have received the last dose of the primary vaccination series at least 14 days and no more than 270 days before arrival or they have received an additional booster dose.

EU countries should also lift the temporary restriction on non-essential travel for persons who have recovered from COVID-19 within 180 days before travelling to the EU if they can prove their recovery with an EU Digital COVID Certificate or a non-EU certificate deemed equivalent to the EU Digital COVID Certificate.

Children

Children over 6 and under 18 who fulfil the conditions set out for adults should be allowed to travel.

All other children over 6 and under 18 should be allowed to travel with a negative PCR test taken at the earliest 72 hours before departure. EU countries could require additional testing after arrival, as well as quarantine or isolation.

No test or additional requirements should be applied to children under the age of 6 travelling with an adult.

Countries on the EU list

When the epidemiological situation in a country improves sufficiently, the Council can include it on the list of countries from where all travel should be possible, regardless of vaccination status. The following countries are currently included on the list:

  • Bahrain
  • Chile
  • China (subject to confirmation of reciprocity)
  • Colombia
  • Indonesia
  • Kuwait
  • New Zealand
  • Peru
  • Qatar
  • Rwanda
  • Saudi Arabia
  • South Korea
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Uruguay

Travel restrictions should also be gradually lifted for the special administrative regions of China Hong Kong and Macao. Under the category of entities and territorial authorities that are not recognised as states by at least one member state, travel restrictions for Taiwan should also be gradually lifted.

The Council last updated the list on 17 January 2022. This list is reviewed every two weeks.

Residents of Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican should be considered EU residents for the purpose of the recommendation. Schengen-associated countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway, Switzerland) also take part in this recommendation.

Emergency brake

The Council recommendation also includes an ‘emergency brake’ mechanism, allowing Member States to act quickly and in a coordinated manner to limit the risk of coronavirus variants entering the EU.

As a Council Recommendation is not a legally binding instrument, Member States and Schengen Associated Countries might apply different measures. Detailed information on the measures in place is available at Re-Open EU.

Overstay caused by travel restrictions

In the context of the coronavirus pandemic, visa holders present in the Schengen area who could not leave before the expiry date of their short-stay visa have had their visa extended up to a maximum stay of 90/180 days by the designated Member States’ authorities. If the visa holders were compelled to stay beyond the extended period of 90/180 days, a national long-stay visa or a temporary residence permit should have been issued by the national authorities.

Member States are encouraged to waive administrative sanctions or penalties on third-country nationals who during the period of travel restrictions were unable to leave their territory due to travel restrictions. Overstays due to the temporary travel restrictions should not be taken into account during the processing of future visa applications.

Nationals of visa-waived third countries who have remained in the Schengen area beyond the permitted 90-day stay

For nationals of visa-waived third-countries who are compelled to stay beyond the extended 90/180 days, the competent national authorities should extend the validity of the authorisations for legal stay, issue a new one or take other appropriate measures that ensure a continued right to stay on their territory. Information is available on the websites of Member States’ national authorities.

Expired travel documents due to an unexpectedly extended stay abroad

EU citizens and their family members who are not in possession of a valid passport and/or visa should be allowed to enter the EU territory, if they can prove by other means that they are EU citizens or family members of an EU citizen. Possession of an expired passport should be deemed to constitute proof by other means in the current situation. Family members should always be able to prove that they are family members of the EU citizen.

Consular assistance for EU citizens abroad

Under EU law, citizens are entitled to seek help from the embassy or consulate of any EU country other than their own if they find themselves in a situation where they need assistance outside the EU, with no available embassy or consulate from their own EU Member State.

After the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, the European Commission and the European External Action Service have helped to bring home stranded EU citizens from all over the world. EU citizens in need of assistance outside the EU are encouraged to contact their Member State.

Documents

Council Recommendation on a coordinated approach to facilitate safe free movement during the COVID-19 pandemic and repealing Recommendation (EU) 2020/1475

Annex to the Proposal for a Council Recommendation on a coordinated approach to facilitate safe free movement during the COVID-19 pandemic and replacing Recommendation (EU) 2020/1475

Commission proposal to amend the Council Recommendation of 13 October 2020 on a coordinated approach to the restriction of free movement in response to the COVID-19 pandemic

(Предложение на Комисията за изменение на препоръката на Съвета от 13 октомври 2020 г. относно координиран подход за ограничаване на свободното движение в отговор на пандемията от COVID-19)

(Propuesta de la Comisión relativa a la modificación de la Recomendación del Consejo, de 13 de octubre de 2020, sobre un enfoque coordinado de la restricción de la libre circulación en respuesta a la pandemia de COVID-19)

(Návrh Komise na změnu doporučení Rady ze dne 13. října 2020 o koordinovaném přístupu k omezení volného pohybu v reakci na pandemii COVID-19)

(Kommissionens forslag om ændring af Rådets henstilling af 13. oktober 2020 om en koordineret tilgang til restriktioner for den frie bevægelighed som reaktion på covid-19-pandemien)

(Vorschlag der Kommission zur Änderung der Empfehlung des Rates vom 13. Oktober 2020 für eine koordinierte Vorgehensweise bei der Beschränkung der Freizügigkeit aufgrund der COVID-19-Pandemie)

(Komisjoni ettepanek muuta nõukogu 13. oktoobri 2020. aasta soovitust, mis käsitleb koordineeritud lähenemisviisi vaba liikumise piiramisele COVID-19 pandeemiale reageerimisel)

(Πρόταση της Επιτροπής για την τροποποίηση της σύστασης του Συμβουλίου, της 13ης Οκτωβρίου 2020 σχετικά με την εφαρμογή συντονισμένης προσέγγισης όσον αφορά τον περιορισμό της ελεύθερης κυκλοφορίας για την αντιμετώπιση της πανδημίας COVID-19)

(Proposition de la Commission visant à modifier la recommandation du Conseil du 13 octobre 2020 relative à une approche coordonnée de la restriction de la libre circulation en réaction à la pandémie de COVID-19)

(Togra ón gCoimisiún chun leasú a dhéanamh ar an Moladh ón gComhairle an 13 Deireadh Fómhair 2020 maidir le cur chuige comhordaithe i leith shrianadh na saorghluaiseachta mar fhreagairt ar phaindéim COVID-19)

(Prijedlog Komisije o izmjeni Preporuke Vijeća od 13. listopada 2020. o koordiniranom pristupu ograničavanju slobodnog kretanja kao odgovor na pandemiju bolesti COVID-19)

(Proposta della Commissione relativa alla modifica della raccomandazione del Consiglio, del 13 ottobre 2020, per un approccio coordinato alla limitazione della libertà di circolazione in risposta alla pandemia di COVID-19)

(Komisijas priekšlikums grozīt Padomes 2020. gada 13. oktobra Ieteikumu par koordinētu pieeju brīvas pārvietošanās ierobežošanai sakarā ar Covid-19 pandēmiju)

(Komisijos pasiūlymas iš dalies pakeisti 2020 m. spalio 13 d. Tarybos rekomendaciją dėl suderinto požiūrio į laisvo judėjimo apribojimą reaguojant į COVID-19 pandemiją)

(A Bizottság javaslata a szabad mozgásnak a Covid19-világjárvány miatti korlátozására vonatkozó koordinált megközelítésről szóló, 2020. október 13-i tanácsi ajánlás módosítására)

(Proposta tal-Kummissjoni biex tiġi emendata r-Rakkomandazzjoni tal-Kunsill tat-13 ta’ Ottubru 2020 dwar approċċ koordinat għar-restrizzjoni tal-moviment liberu b’reazzjoni għall-pandemija tal-COVID-19)

(Voorstel van de Commissie tot wijziging van de aanbeveling van de Raad van 13 oktober 2020 betreffende een gecoördineerde aanpak van de beperking van het vrije verkeer in reactie op de COVID-19-pandem ie)

(Wniosek Komisji dotyczący zmiany zalecenia Rady z dnia 13 października 2020 r. w sprawie skoordynowanego podejścia do ograniczania swobodnego przepływu w odpowiedzi na pandemię COVID-19)

(Proposta da Comissão para alterar a Recomendação do Conselho, de 13 de outubro de 2020, sobre uma abordagem coordenada das restrições à liberdade de circulação em resposta à pandemia de COVID‐19)

(Propunerea Comisiei de modificare a Recomandării Consiliului din 13 octombrie 2020 privind o abordare coordonată a restricționării liberei circulații ca răspuns la pandemia de COVID-19)

(Návrh Komisie na zmenu odporúčania Rady z 13. októbra 2020 o koordinovanom prístupe k obmedzeniu voľného pohybu v reakcii na pandémiu COVID-19)

(Predlog Komisije o spremembi Priporočila Sveta z dne 13. oktobra 2020 o usklajenem pristopu k omejevanju prostega gibanja v odziv na pandemijo COVID-19)

(Komission ehdotus koordinoidusta lähestymistavasta vapaan liikkuvuuden rajoittamiseen covid-19-pandemian johdosta 13 päivänä lokakuuta 2020 annetun neuvoston suosituksen muuttamisesta)

(Kommissionens förslag om ändring av rådets rekommendation av den 13 oktober 2020 om en samordnad strategi för inskränkningar i den fria rörligheten med anledning av covid-19-pandemin)

Travel to Europe: A Reopening Timeline, Country by Country

Jamie Ditaranto is a freelance journalist, photographer, and full-time traveler. Before writing for TripSavvy, Jamie was the Editor of Video and Content for SmarterTravel.com, where she sought to share unique travel experiences like barge cruising in France and sleeping in centuries-old Japanese inns.

France Eases Coronavirus Lockdown

Most European countries are allowing Americans to enter on the condition they can show proof of vaccination. Some will also still accept a negative test result from unvaccinated travelers. In many countries, you may be asked to show proof of vaccination to enter a restaurant or check in to your hotel.

After the emergence of the Omicron variant in late 2021, many places have banned or restricted travel from Southern African countries and tightened entry requirements. However, in most countries, U.S. citizens are still allowed to enter. Every European country is handling the crisis differently, so read on to learn the latest travel requirements and lockdown conditions in each.

Austria

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Austria as long as they can show proof of vaccination (within 360 days) or a certificate of recovery confirming that the traveler has recovered from COVID-19 in the past few months. Travelers will also be required to take a PCR test before entry unless they can show proof of a booster shot. Unvaccinated travelers are required to show a negative test result and quarantine for 10 days. Before boarding, all passengers must complete the Pre-Travel-Clearance Form.

The Baltics

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Estonia, Latvia, or Lithuania if they are fully vaccinated. Fully vaccinated travelers may enter any of these three countries for non-essential reasons without needing to quarantine. Unvaccinated travelers may enter Estonia or Latvia if they qualify for an exception, but will need to show a negative test and self-isolate for 10 days.

Belgium

The U.S. is again considered a “red zone” area and U.S. citizens may only enter Belgium with proof of vaccination and a PCR test taken within 72 hours or an antigen test taken within 36 hours. Unvaccinated travelers who qualify for an Essential Travel Certificate must quarantine for seven days. All travelers will be tested upon arrival and vaccinated travelers must self-isolate until a negative result is returned. A follow-up test on day seven is also required.

Bulgaria

The U.S. has been reclassified as a Red Zone country, which means travelers are only allowed to enter Bulgaria if they qualify for an exception. If so, they will be required to provide proof of vaccination, antibodies, or a negative PCR test. There is no requirement to quarantine.

Croatia

Tourists are allowed to enter Croatia, but they will need proof of vaccination (not older than 365 days), antibodies, or a negative PCR or antigen test. Any traveler who enters Croatia without these documents will be tested on arrival and must self-isolate until negative results come back. Travelers can upload their required documents before arrival on the Enter Croatia website.

Czech Republic

U.S. citizens must show a negative PCR test to enter the Czech Republic, regardless of vaccination status. Travelers who can show proof of receiving a booster shot will be exempt from the testing requirement. As of January 1, the government will consider a vaccination valid if the visitor is within nine months of their second dose. However, a booster shot extends the validity of vaccination indefinitely.

All travelers must also fill out a Personal Locator Form. Unvaccinated travelers will be tested on arrival and must self-isolate until negative results are returned.

Denmark

U.S. citizens will need a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours or an antigen test taken within 48 hours to enter Denmark, regardless of vaccination status. Exceptions will be made for children under 15 years old. Unvaccinated travelers will be tested upon arrival and required to self-isolate for 10 days.

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Finland

All travelers entering Finland must present a negative test taken within 48 hours, regardless of vaccination status. Unvaccinated travelers, except for children, are not allowed to enter Finland for tourism.

France

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter France with proof of vaccination, a negative test taken 48 hours before arrival, and a sworn statement they do not have symptoms. Unvaccinated travelers may be allowed to enter if they qualify for an exception, but they must supply a negative test taken within 48 hours and will also be required to quarantine for seven days.

An indoor and outdoor mask mandate is in place and every person in France is required to obtain a health pass to board an airplane or enter cafes, restaurants, and other businesses. For a fee of up to 36 Euros, tourists can obtain a health pass, or Pass Sanitaire, from a French pharmacy or doctor by showing proof of vaccination or a negative test. If showing a negative test, the pass is only good for 72 hours. As of December 15, any person over the age of 65 will need to have received a booster shot (to be taken between three and seven months after their last dose) to keep their health pass active. This rule applies to everyone over 18 years old.

Germany

Vaccinated travelers arriving from the U.S. are allowed to enter Germany as long as they can show proof of vaccination and a negative test taken within 72 hours. Any unvaccinated traveler who qualifies for an exception or any traveler coming from a virus-variant area must quarantine for 14 days, even if they have been vaccinated.

Greece

Greece has opened its doors to U.S. citizens, who will be allowed to enter with proof of vaccination and a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours. All international travelers are subject to random testing upon arrival in Greece and must complete the Passenger Locator Form. If you are selected for random testing, you must self-quarantine at your destination for 24 hours or until you receive a negative test result. Proof of vaccination is required to enter shops and restaurants, including outdoor cafes.

Hungary

U.S. citizens can now enter Hungary with a negative test taken within 72 hours. There is no requirement to quarantine.

Read Post  Canadians travelling to Europe: requirements and travel tips

Iceland

Only travelers who can prove they have been fully vaccinated are allowed to enter Iceland. Everyone will also need to pre-register their trip and show a negative test taken within 72 hours of departure and will be tested again on arrival, at no extra charge. Unvaccinated travelers who may be allowed to enter Iceland under an exemption will need to provide two negative tests—before and after arrival—and quarantine for at least five days.

Ireland

Vaccinated travelers no longer have to show a negative test to enter Ireland, but unvaccinated travelers must provide a PCR test taken within 72 hours of arrival. Before departure, everyone must fill out the Passenger Locator Form. Unvaccinated passengers that arrive without a negative test must quarantine at home and take a PCR test within 36 hours of entering Ireland.

Italy

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Italy with proof of vaccination (or proof of recovery) and a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours. This will give the traveler a “green pass,” which exempts them from the required 10-day self-isolation. Before traveling to Italy, all passengers must also complete the EU Digital Passport Locator Form.

There are two levels to the green pass. The “basic green pass,” obtained with a negative test, is enough to stay in hotels and use public transportation. However, the “super green pass,” obtained with proof of vaccination, is necessary to dine indoors and visit cultural venues like museums. Until March 31, the super green pass will be necessary to stay in hotels and use public transportation from airplanes to trains and buses.

The Netherlands

Only U.S. citizens who can present proof of vaccination will be allowed to enter. They will also need a negative PCR or antigen test taken within 24 hours. There is no quarantine requirement for those who can show proof of vaccination or a negative test result.

Norway

Norway is allowing some travelers to enter as long as they complete the proper registration and produce proof of vaccination or a negative test taken within 24 hours of arrival. Unvaccinated travelers must get tested upon arrival. A 10-day quarantine is required for any traveler coming from red, dark red, and purple countries unless the individual can provide proof of vaccination. U.S. travelers are now allowed to enter Norway.

Poland

All U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Poland, but proof of vaccination and a negative PCR test taken within 24 hours will be required to enter. Unvaccinated travelers may enter, but in addition to providing a negative test result, they will also have to quarantine for 10 or 14 days depending on whether they are arriving from a Schengen Area country.

Portugal Impacted By Coronavirus

Portugal

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Portugal for tourism if they can show a negative test taken within 72 hours of boarding or proof of vaccination. As of January 10, masks are required indoors and a negative rapid test or proof of vaccination will be required to enter restaurants and check into a hotel. A negative rapid test or proof of receiving a booster shot will also be necessary to enter bars and large events.

Romania

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Romania, but all travelers will be required to present a negative PCR test taken within 48 hours of departure. If no test is presented, fully vaccinated travelers must quarantine for 5 days and unvaccinated travelers must quarantine for 10 days. A green pass proving vaccination will be required to access most businesses in Romania.

Russia

U.S. citizens are now allowed to enter Russia. Everyone traveling to Russia will be required to present a negative PCR test taken within the previous three days of their arrival with no requirement to quarantine.

Serbia

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Serbia with a negative PCR test taken within 48 hours, regardless of vaccination status. However, there’s no need to quarantine.

Spain

U.S. and British citizens can only enter Spain if they can show proof of vaccination. All travelers coming from approved countries are asked to complete a health control form online, which will give them the QR code they will need to show upon entry in Spain in addition to undergoing a health check. No quarantine is required.

Sweden

U.S. citizens may enter Sweden, but they will need to show a negative test taken within 48 hours and proof of vaccination or recovery from COVID-19. Unvaccinated travelers must qualify for an exception to enter Sweden but there is no quarantine requirement.

Switzerland

U.S. citizens may enter Switzerland if they can show proof of vaccination and a negative PCR test. No quarantine is necessary, but everyone will need to complete a second antigen or PCR test between their fourth and seventh day in Switzerland.

All travelers must also complete the entry form before checking into their flight. Tourists in Switzerland will need to obtain and show a Swiss digital vaccine certificate to enter restaurants, museums, and other businesses.

Turkey

Turkey has reopened its borders to travelers from many countries, including the U.S. All passengers traveling to Turkey will undergo a health exam upon arrival and must provide proof of vaccination. Travelers under the age of 12 will need a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours before departure. Travelers from the UK will need to show a negative test regardless of vaccination status and anyone who has visited a high-risk country like Brazil or South Africa within 14 days before entering Turkey will be required to quarantine for 14 days.

Ukraine

U.S. citizens are allowed to enter Ukraine if they can show proof of vaccination or a negative test taken within 72 hours, plus proof of health insurance. Only unvaccinated travelers who do not produce a negative test before entry will be required to quarantine for 10 days.

United Kingdom

All travelers must complete the Passenger Locator Form before departing for the UK. Fully vaccinated travelers may enter the UK without a test, but they will still be required to get tested on arrival by either booking a PCR or antigen test or purchasing an at-home test. They must self-isolate until the results come back negative.

Unvaccinated travelers may be eligible to enter the UK, but they must show a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours before departure self-quarantine for 10 days. They will need to take follow-up tests on the second and eighth days of their quarantine period.

TripSavvy uses only high-quality, trusted sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial policy to learn more about how we keep our content accurate, reliable and trustworthy.

Austrian Embassy. “Travel Information.” December 27, 2021.

U.S. Embassy in Estonia. “ COVID-19 Information.” January 14, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Latvia. “COVID-19 Information.” December 4, 2021.

U.S. Embassy in Lithuania. “COVID-19 Information.” December 30, 2021.

U.S. Embassy in Belgium. “COVID-19 Information.” January 10, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Croatia. “COVID-19 Information.” January 10, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in the Czech Republic. “COVID-19 Information.” January 10, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulate in the Kingdom of Denmark. “COVID-19 Information.” January 14, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Finland. “COVID-19 Information.” January 13, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulates in France. “COVID-19 Information.” January 10, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Germany. “COVID-19 Information.” January 3, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Greece. “COVID-19 Information.” January 7, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Hungary. “COVID-19 Information.” December 6, 2021.

U.S. Embassy in Iceland. “COVID-19 Information.” January 14, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Ireland. “COVID-19 Information.” January 13, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Italy. “COVID-19 Information.” January 14, 2022.

U.S. Embassy and Consulate in the Netherlands. “COVID-19 Information.” December 29, 2021.

Government of Norway. “Travel to Norway.” January 14, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Norway. “COVID-19 Information.” December 13, 2021.

U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Poland. “COVID-19 Information.” January 7, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Romania. “COVID-19 Information.” January 14, 2022.

U.S. Embassy and Consulates in Russia. “COVID-19 Information.” December 6, 2021.

U.S. Embassy in Serbia. “COVID-19 Information.” January 12, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulate in Spain and Andorra. “COVID-19 Information.” December 23, 2021.

U.S. Embassy in Switzerland and Liechtenstein. “COVID-19 Information for Switzerland and Liechtenstein.” January 13, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulates in Turkey. “COVID-19 Information.” January 3, 2022.

U.S. Embassy in Ukraine. “COVID-19 Information.” January 4, 2022.

U.S. Embassy & Consulates in the United Kingdom. “COVID-19 Information.” January 7, 2022.

Traveling To Europe: A Complete Country-By-Country Guide For U.S. Visitors

Aerial view of Berlin, Germany skyline in Europe

Aerial view of Berlin, Germany (Photo Credit: canadastock / Shutterstock.com)

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Albania

Albania is now open to all foreign travel. According to the U.S. Embassy, tourists must submit a vaccination passport where the date of full vaccination is no later than 2 weeks from the date of entry. Additionally, visitors must have a negative PCR test within 72 hours or a rapid antigen test within 48 hours. Alternatively, visitors may provide documentation from a licensed health care provider of having recovered from COVID-19 in the 6 months preceding travel.

As of March 11, Americans can travel to Albania without any additional restrictions.

Face masks are required for any individual 11 years old and above, wearing a mask outdoors is also mandatory when social distancing is not possible. Additionally, theres is a night time curfew in effect from 12am until 6am.

  • The CDC currently classifies Albania at Level Three: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Albania’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Albania.

Andorra

As of March 13, Andorra no longer requires any COVID-related entry documents. However, all foreigners interested in traveling to the country must cross its borders via one of its neighboring countries, either France or Spain. This means that, while Andorra will not require documents, travelers will be subject to the requirements of either France or Spain.

Wearing a mask is mandatory for all public, indoor locations. Restaurants and businesses across Andorra are open, but many require a COVID certificate or other proof of vaccination in order to enter. While tourists should, as always, double check the guidelines of any anticipated tourist attraction, most locations should be operating and welcoming guests.

  • The CDC currently classifies Andorra at Level Three: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.

Updated March 13.

Armenia

Travelers to Armenia are no longer required to provide documentation of vaccination against COVID-19 or a negative COVID-19 test. There are no health screening procedures at the airports or other ports of entry.

The country has also lifted its mask mandate for indoor venues.

  • The CDC currently classifies Armenia at Level One: A Low Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Albania’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Armenia.

Austria

Travelers from all countries, including the United States, can visit Austria, and proof of vaccination, recovery or a test is no longer needed.

Businesses throughout the country are open, and there is no longer a curfew placed on restaurants and bars. Mask mandates have loosened, and masks are no longer required when using public transportation, except for Vienna. In Vienna FFP2 masks are required in pharmacies and all forms of public transportations. Children under 6 are exempt, while those from 6 to 13 can wear a regular mask.

  • The CDC currently classifies Austria at Level Three: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Albania’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the country’s COVID-19 page.

Azerbaijan

Travel to Azerbaijan is currently open to travelers from a list of approved countries, and only via Azerbaijan Airlines. The updating list of permitted countries of origin is available here. As of March 13, the United States is considered a permitted country.

Beginning April 15, 2022, the need for a negative PCR test for entry to Azerbaijan was eliminated, according to The Cabinet of Ministers.

Effective May 1, 2022, masks are no longer required.

  • The CDC currently classifies Azerbaijan at Level One: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Azerbaijan’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Azerbaijan.

Belarus

The borders of Belarus have reopened, but only partially. With very few exceptions, all travelers must exclusively enter through the Minsk National Airport, since almost all land border crossings are prohibited.

The U.S. Department of State issued a Do Not Travel ordinance that prohibits the sale of airline tickets destined for Belarus to all U.S. residents. This safety measure is due to both Belarus’s COVID-19 ordinances and political actions of the country.

  • The CDC currently classifies Belarus at Level Three: A High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Belarus’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, visit the U.S. Embassy in Belarus.

Reviewed June 3.

Belgium

As of May 23, 2022, travel to Belgium for U.S. citizens is permitted. There is no testing or quarantine requirement or a need to present a Passenger Locator Form or valid vaccination, recovery, or test certificate.

Masks, currently required for most indoor venues, will only be mandatory on public transport and in hospitals and care homes. Capacity limits on indoor venues will also be lifted.

  • The CDC currently classifies Belgium at Level Three: A High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Belgium’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Belgium.

Bosnia And Herzegovina

Travel to Bosnia and Herzegovina is permitted to all foreigners, so long as a traveler can provide one of three document options: a negative COVID-19 test from within 72 hours prior to arrival (48 hours if coming from Europe), a COVID-19 vaccination certificate, or a doctor’s certificate of COVID-19 recovery. As of March 13, American travelers can enter Bosnia and Herzegovina and will be asked to provide one of these three documents.

The country’s public attractions and restaurants are open and operating, but follow all rules concerning mask-wearing, social distancing, and gathering capacity limitations. Exact guidelines are dependent on local ordinances.

  • The CDC currently classifies Bosnia and Herzegovina at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Date reviewed: March 13

Bulgaria

Bulgaria classifies countries into green, orange, red, and dark red zones, and entry requirements will differ depending on a traveler’s country of origin. In order to enter the country, travelers from green, orange, and red zones must present proof of vaccination, a recent negative test, or recent proof of recovery.

Bulgaria’s updating list of country classifications is available here. As of March 13, the United States is classified as an orange zone. Because of this, Americans traveling to Bulgaria must bring one of the three valid documents to present upon arrival. If a traveler is unable to present any of these documents, they will be asked to quarantine for several days.

Masks are required at all indoor public places, as well as outdoor public spaces where social distancing is not possible. All of Bulgaria’s famous attractions, including its beaches, cathedrals, and monuments, are open but operate with social distancing and mask mandates. As of October 21, all adults in public indoor spaces are required to provide proof of vaccination, recent recovery, or a negative test result.

  • The CDC currently classifies Bulgaria at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Bulgaria’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Bulgaria.

Updated March 13.

Croatia

Croatia has eliminated all COVID-19-related entry requirements, and travelers can visit without any testing, vaccination or quarantine rules. According to the Croatian National Tourist Board, entry is “subject to the conditions of entry valid before the COVID 19 epidemic.”

Croatia’s restaurants, shops, and beautiful national parks are all open and operating. , Masks are not required on public transportation or indoor entertainment venues. They are however required at a doctor’s office, in medical clinics and hospitals, or if visiting a nursing home.

  • The CDC currently classifies Croatia at Level Three: A High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Croatia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, visit the U.S. Embassy in Croatia.

Date updated June 3.

Cyprus

Cyprus classifies all countries as green, orange, and red, and entrance requirements vary depending on a traveler’s country of origin. Prior to arrival, all travelers must fill out a Cyprus Flight Pass.

A regularly updated list of permitted travelers is available here. As of April 11, the United States — along with almost every other country in the world — is classified as a red zone. This means that all travelers must obtain a CyprusFlightPass with either proof of vaccination, recent recovery, or a recent negative test within 48 hours prior to boarding their flight.

Many institutions in Cyprus require a SafePass — a document proving an individual’s vaccination or recent negative test — in order to enter institutions that hold more than 25 people. For tourists, a CyprusFlightPass can function in place of a SafePass, and allow entrance into the restaurants, shops, and museums across the country.

  • The CDC currently classifies Cyprus at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Cyprus’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, visit the U.S. Embassy in Cyprus.

Updated April 11.

Czechia

For all travelers interested in entering Czechia, proof of vaccination or a medical certificate proving recent recovery will grant access to the country. If more than 9 months have passed since the initial vaccine, a booster shot is also required. For unvaccinated travelers, those from low- and medium-risk countries must provide a negative test, either before or after arrival. Any unvaccinated travelers arriving from countries classified as high or very high risk must provide a negative test, quarantine, and then pass a second test.

A regularly updated list of country classifications is available here. As of March 13, the United States is classified as a very high-risk country. Because of this, vaccinated Americans or recently recovered Americans can provide their proof of vaccination or certificate of recovery as valid entry documents. Meanwhile, unvaccinated Americans can only travel for essential purposes.

Across the country, museums, hotels, and public venues require either a recent negative COVID test or a proof of vaccination in order to enter. While not common for all businesses, other types of establishments may also ask the same. Mask mandates and social distancing guidelines are present throughout Czechia.

  • The CDC currently classifies Czechia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Czechia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Czechia.

Updated March 13.

Denmark

Denmark is open to all travelers. The country has no COVID-related entry requirements.

Denmark’s restaurants, shops, and tourist attractions are open, welcoming tourists and locals alike. Masks, social distancing, and proof of vaccination are no longer required by law, but some institutions (especially medical facilities, elder care facilities, and public transportation) still require them.

  • The CDC currently classifies Denmark at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Denmark’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Denmark.
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Updated April 6.

Estonia

The borders of Estonia are open to all vaccinated travelers, regardless of their country of origin, with no additional testing or quarantining requirements. Unvaccinated travelers may also enter the country, but their required entry documents depend on their country of origin.

Prior to entering Estonia, all travelers are required to fill out a declaration of health. As of March 13, vaccinated Americans should bring with them proof of vaccination, while unvaccinated Americans should provide a negative test and plan on quarantining for several days.

Estonia’s restaurants, shops, museums, and tourist attractions are all open, but most require a Digital COVID Certificate upon entry, which assures an institution that someone is fully vaccinated. Masks are required in all indoor public locations.

  • The CDC currently classifies Estonia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Estonia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Estonia.

Date reviewed: March 13

Finland

Finland has a complex series of rules for crossing the border, depending on a traveler’s country of origin, but the rule across the board is that any fully vaccinated traveler is allowed to enter the country. Regardless of home country, a traveler will need to provide proof of vaccination in order to enter Finland.

If an unvaccinated traveler is coming from the EU and Schengen countries, or an area with “normal cross-border traffic,” they are still able to travel to Finland. Meanwhile, unvaccinated travelers from all other countries — including the United States — are banned from entering the country for anything other than essential travel. A full breakdown of country-by-country restrictions is available on the Finnish Border Guard website.

This means that, as of March 13, vaccinated Americans should travel with proof of vaccination, while unvaccinated Americans will not be allowed to travel to Finland for non-essential reasons.

The popular castles, cathedrals, and bustling cities of Finland are once again open to tourists, as well as the country’s shops and restaurants. All businesses have some form of social distancing, and mask requirements are dependent on local guidelines. Many businesses require proof of vaccination for entry.

  • The CDC currently classifies Finland at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Finland’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Finland.

Updated March 13.

France

The borders of France are open to all vaccinated travelers. Requirements to enter are proof of full vaccination and a sworn declaration stating the traveler has no symptoms and has not been in contact with a confirmed case in the past two weeks. If more than 9 months have passed since the initial vaccine, a booster shot is also required.

France keeps an updating list of green, orange, and red countries, and unvaccinated travelers (with a recent negative test) can only enter the country for leisure and travel purposes if coming from a country in the green zone. Unvaccinated travelers from orange and red zones are banned from entry unless they have “pressing ground to travel.” An updating list of country classifications is available here.

As of March 15, the United States is considered a green country, meaning vaccinated travelers should bring proof of vaccination (and booster, if applicable), while unvaccinated travelers must show a recent negative COVID test (48 hours for a rapid antigen test; 72 hours for a PCR test) or proof of recovery within the past 6 months.

France’s iconic tourist landmarks, including its restaurants, shops, museums, and cafés, are all open and no longer require a French Vaccine Pass, which assures an institution that someone is fully vaccinated, upon entry. The passes will still be required to enter hospitals and nursing homes.

  • The CDC currently classifies France at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of France’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in France.

Updated March 15.

Georgia

Travelers from all countries can enter Georgia, regardless of vaccination status. Vaccinated travelers can present proof of vaccination as an entry document, while unvaccinated travelers can present a negative test from within 72 hours of arrival. Required documents no longer vary depending on entry route, meaning necessary documents are consistent throughout the country.

This means that, as of March 13, all Americans are permitted to travel to Georgia with either a recent negative test or proof of vaccination as an entry document. That said, the state department has issued a Do Not Travel warning for the Russian-occupied regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia due to unrest.

Georgia has discontinued its Green Pass System, which required proof of vaccination or a negative test to gain access to most businesses and restaurants.

  • The CDC currently classifies Georgia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Georgia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, visit the U.S. Embassy in Georgia.

Updated March 13.

Germany

Germany is open to most travelers, depending on their country of origin. Those permitted to enter the country must be able to provide either proof of vaccination or a medical recovery certificate. Any unvaccinated travelers from “high-risk” countries can only enter for essential purposes, and will have to quarantine for 10 days, while all travelers coming from a “virus-variant area,” regardless of vaccination status, can only travel for essential purposes and must quarantine for 14 days after arrival.

A continuously updated list of country classifications is available here. As of March 13, the United States is no longer considered a “high-risk” country. This means that all vaccinated Americans are able to travel to Germany with either proof of vaccination or a recovery certificate, with no additional requirements upon arrival. Unvaccinated Americans cannot travel to Germany for tourism purposes.

Germany’s popular tourist destinations and its local restaurants and shops are all open, but operate under various mask mandates and gathering limitations. Many businesses require patrons to provide proof of vaccination or recent recovery.

  • The CDC currently classifies Germany at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Germany’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Germany.

Updated March 13.

Greece

The borders of Greece are fully open, but requirements vary depending on a traveler’s country of origin. In order to enter the country, all travelers must provide proof of vaccination, while travelers outside of EU and Schengen countries must also provide a negative COVID-19 test taken within 72 hours of arrival. If more than 9 months have passed since the initial vaccination, fully vaccinated travelers will need proof of a booster shot. All passengers are subject to additional randomized health screenings.

A continuously updated list of Greece’s country-by-country entry requirements is available here. As of March 13, all vaccinated American travelers can enter Greece but will be asked to provide both proof of vaccination and a recent negative test.

Popular tourist attractions are open, but operate with capacity limitations, while restaurants, cafés, and nightclubs require proof of vaccination or medical recovery certificates at entry. The country continues to require masks in all indoor public areas, but not at uncrowded outdoor events.

  • The CDC currently classifies Greece at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Greece’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, visit the U.S. Embassy in Greece.

Updated March 13.

Hungary

Hungary is open to all travelers. On March 7, the country dropped all COVID-related restrictions upon entry.

Hungary’s popular tourist destinations and its local restaurants and shops are all open, and masks are only required in social and healthcare institutions.

  • The CDC currently classifies Hungary at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Hungary’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Hungary.

Updated March 29.

Iceland

On February 25, Iceland officially dropped all COVID-related entry requirements. This means travelers do not have to undergo any testing, provide proof of vaccination, or quarantine.

In addition to loosening requirements at the border, the rest of the country has dropped all mask mandates and social distancing guidelines. While some individual businesses may enact their own policies, there are no longer any country-wide official COVID prevention measures.

  • The CDC currently classifies Iceland at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Iceland’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Iceland.

Updated March 13.

Ireland

On March 6, Ireland officially dropped all COVID-related entry requirements. This means travelers do not have to undergo any testing, provide proof of vaccination, or quarantine. The country also no longer requires travelers to complete a COVID-19 Passenger Locator Form.

Irish restaurants, shops, museums, and other tourist attractions are open but are subject to mask mandates, social distancing rules, and capacity limits. In January, the country dropped all restaurant and bar curfews.

  • The CDC currently classifies Ireland at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Ireland’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Ireland.

Updated March 13.

Italy

On June 1, Italy lifted all COVID-19-related entry requirements. Travelers may visit the country without proof of vaccinations, tests or proof of recovery. Additionally the Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced that a Green Pass, or equivalent is no longer needed to enter the country.

While the EU recently decided to drop mask mandates, Italy will still require masks to be worn on all public transportation, at indoor performances in theaters, cinemas, indoor sporting events and other indoor entertainment venues until at least June 15.

  • The CDC currently classifies Italy at Level Three: A High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Italy’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Italy.

Kazakhstan

As of now, the borders to Kazakhstan remain almost entirely closed off from tourists. For a comprehensive list of the few exceptions to this rule, trips that would be classified as essential travel can be found here. These restrictions will remain in place indefinitely until rescinded by the Kazakhstan government.

  • The CDC currently classifies Kazakhstan as unknown and does not recommend travel.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Kazakhstan’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Kazakhstan.

Updated March 13.

Kosovo

While Kosovo’s borders are open for travelers, international flights to and from the country remain limited. Travelers should be aware that many countries will not offer direct flights to Kosovo.

Entry requirements depend on a traveler’s vaccination status. Fully vaccinated travelers can present proof of vaccination upon entry, while partially vaccinated individuals should present both proof of vaccination and a recent negative test. If more than 12 months have passed since the initial vaccination, fully vaccinated travelers will need proof of a booster shot. Unvaccinated travelers can provide either a certificate of recent recovery or a negative test no older than 48 hours. This means that, as of March 13, both vaccinated and unvaccinated Americans can travel to Kosovo for tourism purposes.

Wearing a mask is required in almost all public settings, with few exceptions. Other social distancing and capacity limitations are in place throughout businesses.

  • The CDC currently classifies Kosovo at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Kosovo’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Kosovo.

Updated March 13.

Latvia

Travel to Latvia is open to travelers from a select list of countries. Latvia welcomes all individuals from the EU, EEA, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and an updating list of countries, available here, considered “low risk.” The country also welcomes vaccinated travelers from “high risk” countries. As of March 13, the United States is a “high risk” country, meaning that only vaccinated Americans can travel to Latvia for tourism purposes.

In order to enter Latvia, vaccinated travelers must provide a U.S. CDC vaccine card, a digital EU certificate, or proof of vaccination issued in the EU, the EEA countries, Switzerland, or the UK.

Most businesses, including restaurants, museums, and other tourist attractions, require customers to present proof of vaccination or a recent recovery in order to enter. Mask mandates are dependent on local ordinances and business requirements.

  • The CDC currently classifies Latvia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Latvia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Latvia.

Updated March 13.

Liechtenstein

A traveler’s ability to enter Liechtenstein is dependent on the regulations of its neighboring country, Switzerland. Entry requirements and regulations are the same for both.

All countries are classified as those with a variant of concern, and those without. A list of country classifications is available here. As of March 13, the United States is not classified as a country with a variant of concern.

All travelers entering from a country without a variant of concern must provide proof of vaccination or a medical certificate of recovery. There are no quarantine requirements. Currently, unvaccinated travelers are not permitted to enter the country for tourism purposes. As of March 13, vaccinated American travelers can enter Liechtenstein upon presenting a recent negative test and one of the two document options.

Restaurants, businesses, and transportation are all open in Liechtenstein, with mask mandates, social distancing guidelines, and capacity limitations dependent on businesses and local ordinances.

  • The CDC currently classifies Liechtenstein at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Liechtenstein’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Liechtenstein.

Updated March 13.

Lithuania

Travel to Lithuania is open to all countries, but requirements vary depending on a traveler’s country of origin. As of February 15, 2022, all travelers from European Union countries (plus Iceland, Liechtenstein, and Norway) no longer have to provide proof of vaccination, a document of recovery, or a negative test.

Travelers from all other countries are required to fill out a National Public Health Center questionnaire prior to arrival. They must also provide one of three documents: proof of complete vaccination (with booster if the vaccination was taken more than 9 months prior), a negative PCR COVID test no older than 72 hours, or a medical certificate of recovery.

Lithuania has a mask mandate requiring face coverings in all indoor public spaces. While restaurants, shops, and museums are open, most are operating under stricter capacity limitations and safety mandates.

  • The CDC currently classifies Lithuania at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Lithuania’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Lithuania.

Updated March 13.

Luxembourg

The borders of Luxembourg are open to all travelers from the EU and a list of approved countries, available here. Vaccinated travelers from an additional list of countries are also permitted to enter. As of March 13, vaccinated travelers from the United States are permitted to enter Luxembourg.

While some travelers can show a recent negative test to gain entry, American travelers must instead provide proof of complete vaccination or a medical certificate of recovery upon entry. This means that unvaccinated Americans cannot travel to Luxembourg for tourism purposes.

Restaurants, museums, and most public spaces require proof of vaccination or recent recovery to enter. Most locations will not permit unvaccinated individuals. Masks remain mandatory in most public spaces, with exceptions for markets and shopping centers.

  • The CDC currently classifies Luxembourg at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Luxembourg’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Luxembourg.

Date reviewed: March 13

Malta

Travel to Malta is open only to vaccinated travelers from a select list of countries. If a traveler arrives without sufficient proof of vaccination, they will be required to quarantine for two weeks. If more than 3 months have passed since the initial vaccine, a booster shot is also required.

Individuals from countries classified as a “dark red zone” are not allowed to enter Malta for leisure or tourism reasons. A continuously updated list of region classifications is available here. As of March 13, the United States is not on this list. Because of this, vaccinated Americans are permitted to travel to Malta, and must bring their proof of vaccination with them as an entry document. There are no other entry document options.

Most shops, museums, and tourist attractions across Malta are open, but mass gatherings remain banned indefinitely. Masks are required across the country in all public places, including outdoor locations, regardless of vaccination status. While not the case for all restaurants, some will only seat those who can provide proof of vaccination.

  • The CDC currently classifies Malta at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Malta’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Malta.

Updated March 13.

Moldova

Travel to Moldova is open to tourists from all countries, provided they can show proof of vaccination, a medical certificate of recovery, or a negative COVID test taken 72 hours or fewer before arrival. If a traveler has none of these documents, they will be required to quarantine for two weeks. As of March 13, American travelers can enter Moldova and will be asked to provide one of these three documents.

Businesses are open, but most require either proof of vaccination or a recent negative test in order to enter. The country has a mask mandate for all indoor public places, while some local ordinances have an additional mask requirement for outdoor events.

  • The CDC currently classifies Moldova at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Moldova’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Moldova.

Updated March 13.

Monaco

All tourists are welcome to visit Monaco, provided that they can show either proof of vaccination or a medical certificate of recovery. Travelers from “green zones” may opt to present a recent negative COVID test instead. Tourists from either the “orange zone” or the “red zone” are not permitted to use a negative test as an entry document, and can instead only use the vaccine or recovery certificate. A regularly updated list of country classifications is available here.

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As of March 13, the United States is considered an “orange zone.” This means Americans can enter Monaco with either proof of vaccination or a certificate of recovery. A recent negative test is not sufficient for American travelers.

While Monaco’s mask mandates and social distancing measures vary by establishment, all restaurants, businesses, and tourist attractions are open, welcoming both tourists and locals. A breakdown of rules by establishment is available here.

  • The CDC currently classifies Monaco at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.

Updated March 13.

Montenegro

Travel to Montenegro is open to tourists from all countries, provided they can show proof of vaccination, a medical certificate of recovery, or a negative COVID test taken no longer than 72 hours before arrival. If a traveler has none of these documents, they will be required to quarantine for two weeks. As of March 13, American travelers can enter Montenegro upon presenting one of these three documents.

Many restaurants, museums, and other businesses require some proof of vaccination, a recent negative test, or a medical certificate of recovery in order to enter the establishment. Masks are required in all indoor public spaces, as well as any outdoor events where social distancing is not possible.

  • The CDC currently classifies Montenegro at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Montenegro’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Montenegro.

Updated March 13.

Netherlands

The borders of the Netherlands are partially open, welcoming tourists from the EU/Schengen area as well other countries deemed safe. Travelers from other countries are welcome if they fit into certain exemption categories from the Netherlands’ EU entry ban.

As of March 24, the U.S. is not considered a safe country. Travelers from the U.S. are only able to enter the Netherlands if they are fully vaccinated, have recently recovered from COVID-19, or meet other narrow exemption categories. Fully vaccinated and recently recovered visitors must fill out a health declaration form and provide proof of a booked trip home.

While masks remain mandatory in airports and on planes, all other businesses enforce their own mask-wearing policies.

  • The CDC currently classifies the Netherlands at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of the Netherlands’ COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the Netherlands’ official site and the U.S. Embassy in the Netherlands.

Updated March 24.

North Macedonia

Travel to North Macedonia is permitted to all foreigners, so long as a traveler can provide one of three document options: a negative COVID test taken within 72 hours prior to arrival, a vaccination certificate, or a doctor’s certificate of recovery. As of March 13, American travelers can enter North Macedonia and will be asked to provide one of these three documents.

Masks are still required in all indoor public spaces, as well as any outdoor events where social distancing is not possible. Restaurants, museums, and tourist attractions are all open but operate under social distancing guidelines and capacity limitations.

  • The CDC currently classifies North Macedonia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of North Macedonia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in North Macedonia.

Updated March 13.

Norway

On February 12, Norway officially dropped all COVID-related entry requirements. This means travelers do not have to undergo any testing, provide proof of vaccination, or quarantine.

In addition to eliminating all remaining entry requirements, the country has dropped all mask mandates and social distancing guidelines. While some individual businesses may enact their own policies, there are no longer any country-wide official COVID prevention measures.

  • The CDC currently classifies Norway at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Norway’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Norway.

Updated March 13.

Poland

The borders of Poland are partially open, welcoming tourists from EU and Schengen countries, as well as other countries deemed safe. All travelers from outside the Schengen area must provide a recent negative COVID test, regardless of vaccination status. If unvaccinated, travelers will have to quarantine for several days. Travelers can provide either proof of vaccination or a medical certificate of recovery to bypass any quarantine requirements.

A list of approved countries is available here. As of March 13, the United States is considered an approved country. This means Americans are permitted to travel to Poland but must bring a recent negative test and either proof of vaccination or a recovery certificate. If unvaccinated or unable to provide either document, American travelers will be asked to quarantine for several days.

Masks are required in all indoor public locations. Restaurants, hotels, museums, parks, and tourist attractions are open.

  • The CDC currently classifies Poland at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Poland’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Poland.

Updated March 13.

Portugal

Travel to Portugal is open to most foreigners, so long as they can provide either an EU Digital Vaccination Certificate or a recent negative COVID test. All travelers must also fill out a SEF Registration Form prior to entry. A regularly updated list of permitted countries of origin is available here.

As of March 13, the United States is an approved country. This means all American travelers should plan on filling out the registration form and providing a recent negative test as their entry document. All travelers must present a recent negative test, regardless of vaccination status.

Masks are required in indoor public spaces, as well as any outdoor events where social distancing is not possible. Many hotels, restaurants, and businesses will require either an EU Digital Vaccination Certificate or a negative test in order to enter. Shops, museums, and tourist attractions are all open to the public.

  • The CDC currently classifies Portugal at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Portugal’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Portugal.

Date reviewed: March 13

Romania

Non-essential travel to Romania is available to almost all fully vaccinated foreigners. In order to enter the country, a traveler must present either a COVID-19 vaccination certificate showing full vaccination completion or a medical certificate of recent COVID-19 recovery, along with a negative test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival.

If a traveler is not able to provide any of these documents, they will be required to quarantine for fourteen days. If an unvaccinated traveler can provide only the negative test, they must quarantine for 10 days. Exact quarantine requirements are dependent on a traveler’s country of origin.

As of March 13, Americans can travel to Romania but must bring either proof of vaccination or a recovery certificate as an entry document, in addition to a negative test. If they cannot provide these documents, American travelers will be expected to quarantine.

There is a nationwide curfew from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. While some non-essential businesses remain closed, most have reopened, hosting guests so long as they follow safety measures. Mask mandates, social distancing guidelines, and capacity limitations are dependent on businesses and local ordinances. Many locations require a Green Pass, signifying complete vaccination, upon entry.

  • The CDC currently classifies Romania at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Romania’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Romania.

Updated March 13.

Russia

Non-essential travel to Russia is limited only to travelers from certain countries. As of March 13, the United States is included on the list, meaning that Americans can now travel to Russia for tourism purposes. All tourists permitted to enter the country must fill out this form and provide a negative COVID test taken no more than 48 hours before arrival.

Masks are required in all indoor public locations. Restaurants, museums, and tourist attractions are open, operating with social distancing, capacity limitations, and other health safety measures. Some locations require proof of vaccination upon entry.

The U.S. currently has a Do Not Travel advisory for Russia, advising all U.S. residents in the country to leave.

  • The CDC currently classifies Russia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Russia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Russia.

Date reviewed: March 13

San Marino

On June 3, 2021, San Marino began allowing movement across its Italian border. The Italian border remains the only entry point into the country, meaning all tourists interested in traveling to San Marino must also review Italy’s entry requirements. San Marino has no additional document, testing, or quarantine requirements of its own.

As of March 13, Americans can travel to Italy — and to San Marino — by providing a recent negative test, proof of vaccination, or a recent recovery certificate as an entry document.

The country continues to maintain mask mandates and strict social distancing guidelines, but all museums, restaurants, and tourist attractions are open and welcoming visitors.

  • The CDC currently classifies San Marino at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.

Updated March 13.

Serbia

Serbia has opened its borders for all foreigners, so long as they can provide one of three documents: proof of complete vaccination, a negative COVID test taken 48 or fewer hours prior to arrival, or a medical certificate of recovery. A short list of countries, available here, are deemed special risk and require additional documentation upon arrival.

As of March 13, the United States is not on that list. Because of this, Americans traveling to Serbia must bring a recent negative test, proof of vaccination, or a certificate of recovery as their entry document.

The country’s public attractions and restaurants are open and operating, but follow all rules concerning mask wearing, social distancing, and gathering limitations. Exact guidelines are dependent on local ordinances. All indoor dining must close by 1 a.m.

  • The CDC currently classifies Serbia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Serbia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Serbia.

Date reviewed: March 13

Slovakia

Slovakia categorizes all travelers into two categories: the fully vaccinated and the unvaccinated, and each group has its own entry requirements.

Both groups must register here prior to arrival. Fully vaccinated travelers are classified as either those who have received or those with a medical recovery certificate. If more than 9 months have passed since the initial vaccination, fully vaccinated travelers will need proof of a booster shot. These travelers are exempt from any quarantine upon arrival. Unvaccinated travelers, meanwhile, will be required to quarantine for 5 days or until they undergo a test and receive a negative result.

As of March 13, Americans can travel to Slovakia with proof of vaccination or a recovery certificate as their entry document, in addition to a recent negative test. Unvaccinated Americans cannot travel for non-essential reasons.

Masks remain mandatory in all public indoor spaces. Most restaurants, museums, and shops are operating under social distancing guidelines and capacity limitations. Some locations may require proof of vaccination or a negative test in order to enter an establishment.

  • The CDC currently classifies Slovakia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Slovakia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Slovakia.

Updated March 13.

Slovenia

On February 21, Slovenia officially dropped all COVID-related entry requirements. This means travelers do not have to undergo any testing, provide proof of vaccination, or quarantine.

In addition to eliminating all remaining entry requirements, the country has dropped all mask mandates and social distancing guidelines. While some individual businesses may enact their own policies, there are no longer any country-wide official COVID prevention measures.

  • The CDC currently classifies Slovenia at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Slovenia’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Slovenia.

Date reviewed: March 13

Spain

Travelers to Spain must show proof of vaccination or proof they contracted COVID-19 and recovered within 6 months. Children under 12 are exempt from showing any vaccination or test certificates.

As of May 21, 2022, unvaccinated travelers will be allowed to enter the country with proof of a negative PCR test taken within 72 hours of their departure, or a negative rapid antigen test taken within 24 hours of their departure.

Travelers without an EU Digital COVID certificate, must complete the SpTH Health Control Form.

It is no longer mandatory to wear a mask indoors or outdoors with a few exceptions. Masks are required on public transportation, and in healthcare settings.

  • The CDC currently classifies Spain at Level Thre: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Spain’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Spain.

Sweden

Sweden is currently open to tourists from all countries. There are no COVID-related entry requirements. The country’s normal entry requirements, like the obligation to apply for a visa if you’re staying for fewer than 90 days, still apply.

Restaurants, businesses, transportation, and tourist attractions are all open in Sweden. In February, Sweden officially dropped all capacity limits, social distancing guidelines, and mask mandates.

  • The CDC currently classifies Sweden a Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Sweden’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Sweden.

Updated April 6.

Switzerland

On February 17, Switzerland lifted many of its COVID-related guidelines, but entry requirements stayed the same. This means that all travelers are required to provide proof of vaccination or a medical certificate of recovery. Currently, unvaccinated Americans cannot travel to Switzerland for non-essential purposes.

Whil entry requirements can change depending on a traveler’s country of origin, no countries are currently classified as containing a “variant of concern.”

Masks remain mandatory only on public transport and in healthcare facilities. Restaurants, businesses, and tourist attractions are open, welcoming both tourists and locals.

  • The CDC currently classifies Switzerland at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Switzerland’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Switzerland.

Updated March 13.

Türkiye (Turkey)

Travel across Türkiye‘s borders is permitted to almost everyone, with a select few exceptions. Prior to arrival, all travelers must fill out an online form. Upon arrival, tourists must present proof of vaccination, a medical recovery certificate, or a negative COVID test.

Travelers from a short list of high-risk countries, available here, will have to submit to additional testing and quarantine regulations. As of March 13, the United States is not included on the list. This means Americans can travel to Türkiye as long as they can provide proof of vaccination, a recent negative test, or a recovery certificate.

Restaurants and businesses across Türkiye are open, and the country no longer requires masks indoors, as long as social distancing is possible. Tourists should, as always, double check the guidelines of any anticipated tourist attraction, but most should be operating and welcoming guests. Almost all forms of public transportation, as well as some businesses, require proof of vaccination or a recent negative test.

  • The CDC currently classifies Turkey at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Turkey’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in Turkey.

Date reviewed: March 13

Ukraine

Travel to Ukraine is open to tourists from all countries, provided they can show proof of vaccination, a medical certificate of recovery, or a negative COVID test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. Additionally, Ukraine requires travelers to show proof of medical insurance that would cover any necessary treatment for COVID. Unvaccinated travelers will have to undergo another test upon arrival and quarantine while awaiting results.

Travelers from a short list of countries will be required to quarantine for two weeks, with no exceptions. The list, available here, currently does not include the United States. This means that, as of March 13, all Americans can travel to Ukraine as long as they can provide proof of vaccination, a recent negative test, or a recovery certificate, as well as proof of medical insurance.

Most businesses and restaurants have reopened, hosting guests so long as they maintain social distancing precautions. Masks remain mandatory across the country.

Due to the ongoing war in Ukraine, the U.S. currently has a Do Not Travel advisory for the country, advising all U.S. residents in the country to leave. The U.S. Embassy of Kyiv has suspended all operations until further notice.

  • The CDC currently classifies Ukraine at Level Four: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of Ukraine’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, visit the U.S. Embassy in Ukraine.

Updated March 13.

United Kingdom

Travel to the United Kingdom is open to tourists throughout the world, regardless of vaccination status. Visitors no longer need to complete a passenger locator form, submit a negative COVID test, or quarantine upon arrival.

In the past, Scotland, Northern Ireland, and Wales have operated under different requirements, but as of March 21, all locations have the same entry process.

In the U.K., all restaurants, businesses, and tourist attractions are open, welcoming both tourists and locals. Besides in Northern Ireland, where mask-wearing isn’t legally enforced, face coverings are mandatory on most modes of public transportation and in shops. In the London Tube, masks aren’t mandatory but are “strongly encouraged.”

  • The CDC currently classifies the United Kingdom at Level Three: A Very High Level of COVID.
  • For the country’s latest COVID numbers, reference the World Health Organization.
  • For a detailed overview of the United Kingdom’s COVID testing processes, travel restrictions, and more, check the U.S. Embassy in the United Kingdom.

Reviewed June 3.

Madalena Robertson is a Seattle native who has lived all across the United States, currently calling Las Vegas home. She is a communications expert who has worked on presidential campaigns and is pursuing a graduate certificate at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Her travels have taken her to London, Costa Rica, and Canada, as well as all across the United States.

Source https://ec.europa.eu/info/live-work-travel-eu/coronavirus-response/travel-during-coronavirus-pandemic_en

Source https://www.tripsavvy.com/europe-travel-border-reopenings-4845817

Source https://www.travelawaits.com/2662387/can-americans-travel-to-europe-covid-travel-restrictions/

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