Table of Contents

Birth Certificate Apostille for Netherlands

This is, therefore, an important action that is to be taken when you are planning to visit Netherlands, The Ministry of External Affairs must authorise it. It is a sole stamp known an apostille. This is a lengthy process and is normally obtained with the help of Excellent Apostille Services in India. It can really be easier to approach the apostille process through EASSPL for Netherlands as it can assist in arranging the procedure done fast without you having to leave your convenience position.

Note: India has joined the Hague Convention in the year 2008, that ended the requirement of Netherlands Embassy legalization for Birth Certificate. It is counted as own record authentication, and it is necessary to find the most faithful certificate apostille services to ensure True apostille of papers and certificates.

How To Legalize Your Birth Certificate In The Netherlands

Why is Birth certificate Apostille required for Netherlands?

There is a policy of Netherlands that demand birth certificate with apostille stamp to permit a visitor to enter their nation. It is a part of security. This process will certify the legitimacy of your Birth Certificate for Education or employment in Netherlands. With this Apostille stamp, the Birth certificate becomes right, genuine, and recognised by MEA of Netherlands. Holding apostille on a birth certificate means there is no requirement for any more further attestation from the Netherlands Embassy.

When is Birth certificate Apostille required for Netherlands?

What is Birth Certificate Apostille Stamp for Netherlands?

An apostille is a sticker stamp of square shape which itself is a printed form consisting of 11 standard fields. On the top is the text APOSTILLE, under which the text Convention de La Haye du 5 October 1961 (English: Hague Convention of 5 October 1961) is placed. The fields contain the following important information and Apostille certificate will be placed on the backside of the document itself.

Birth Certificate Apostille

Birth Certificate Apostille Stamp Sample

  • Country: INDIA
  • This public document of the Type: Birth Certificate
  • Has been signed by: Name of the officer recognised by the MEA
  • With the Seal/Stamp of: Acting in the capacity of
  • Certified by: Acting in the capacity of
  • On: Date of Apostille
  • At: Location of Apostille
  • Reference No: 4 Alpha and 10 Numeric numbers
  • Is issued to: Name of the Document Holder
  • Seal/stamp: of the authority giving the Apostille
  • Signature: Signature of authority giving the Apostille

What documents are needed to obtain an apostille birth certificate for The Netherlands?

Netherlands demands Apostille on the original birth certificate. so, The Apostille stamp should be printed particularly on the original Birth Certificate. A birth certificate should be in an obviously better position; all signs and stamps have to be readable and clear. Moreover, it must not contain alien labels/marking.

The time duration of the Birth certificate Apostille process for Netherlands.

The Apostille procedure is a multi-step legalization process for a birth certificate. so, Getting on Birth certificate an apostille sticker is a lengthy procedure. It has to be reviewed by the Home Ministry or SDM. The MEA can finally issue the Apostille stamp for a birth certificate. so it takes 7 to 8 working days time and The time limit depends upon the issued place of Birth Certificate although There are multiple ways to end process on a fast route. Contact Us.

Birth certificate Apostille with home Attestation

The Officials for Netherlands Apostille Procedure in India.

To arrive the final MEA Apostille, The birth certificate has to pass through some obligatory primary legalization process from the below-mentioned Officials.

EAS : The Excellent Apostille Services is a private professional and non-government agency that collecting Birth Certificate from all over India and submitting in MEA for apostille. The document submission to EAS is the beginning step of a Birth certificate apostille procedure.

NOTARY : The initial step in the authentication of the Birth Certificate is getting them certified from the Notary. It provides a sticker and sign. It is the leading step for Birth Certificate.

HOME DEPARTMENT : The Birth Certificate Attestation based on the signature of the designated signing authorities of the State Government/Union Territory. The Birth Certificate verification is to be done by the State Home Department. The Officials are hired only for documents attestation.

SDM : The SDM works personally full form is Sub-Divisional Magistrate and so does the certification. It is a makeshift key for Birth Certificate Apostille process

MEA : The MEA is Central Government which Authenticate the Birth Certificate. The Ministry of External Affairs must legalize birth Certificate. It is a special stamp called an Apostille.

HOW TO GET YOUR BIRTH CERTIFICATE APOSTILLE FOR NETHERLANDS

Birth Certificate Apostille Procedure for Netherlands

Birth Certificate Apostille Procedure

Birth Certificate Apostille Process for Netherlands

Note: SDM (SUB-DIVISIONAL MEGISTRATE) is a makeshift key for Birth Certificate Apostille process which is also genuine and valid process for personal document.

How to obtain an apostille birth certificate for Netherlands?

Candidate can regional level process personally as per above chart instruction. Finally, the Apostille stamp is obtained by the central government. But to get an apostille stamp, a candidate can not directly go to The Ministry of External Affairs. They may submit a birth certificate to RPO or EAS for Apostille Stamp only or complete apostille process. The EAS is the accountable consultancy giving true authentication of documents in the quickest time possible. We provide apostille services in Mumbai, Pune, Ahmedabad, Delhi, Bangalore, Chennai, Hyderabad, Goa, Kolkata, Bhopal, Indore, Surat, Vadodara, Rajkot, Jaipur, Nagpur, Patna, Ranchi, Kochi, Noida, Mangalore, Mysore, Coimbatore, Nashik, Lucknow, Kanpur, and many more cities. See below your Benefits during the use of our services.

  • 24*7 CUSTOMER CARE SERVICE AVAILABLE.
  • NO NEED SUBSCRIPTION/REGISTRATION
  • WE ACCEPT CERTIFICATES FROM ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD
  • FREE PICKUP/DELIVERY SERVICE ACROSS THE INDIA.
  • YOUR PHYSICAL PRESENCE IS NOT REQUIRED.
  • SAFETY AND AUTHENTICITY IS ALWAYS OUR TOP PRIORITY AND CONCERN.
  • PART PAYMENT AFTER FINISH PROCESS.
  • WORKING WITH US IS EASY AND COMFORTABLE!
  • FAST & HASSLE FREE PROCESSING
  • PAY ONLINE SERVICE CHARGE BY BANK TRANSFER, CARD, CHEQUE, PAYTM, UPI, PAYPAL
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Important Note:

Free pick-up and drop service in India only. We are not able to pick up document from overseas or delivery at overseas, Courier services are charged which is according to the courier service’s rates.

Travel documents for non-EU family members

Travelling in the EU with your non-EU family members

Under EU rules, you have the right to travel together with your core family members (non-EU spouse, children, dependent parents or dependent grandparents) to an EU country other than the one you are a national of. If you have moved to another EU country, they can also join you there. These rules also apply to your non-EU registered partner if the country they are travelling to considers registered partnerships as equivalent to marriage.

Other non-EU extended family members – such as siblings, cousins, aunts, uncles, as well as your non-EU registered partner (in countries where registered partnerships are not considered as equivalent to marriage) – may under certain conditions be entitled to have their entry facilitated when travelling together with you or when joining you in another EU country. EU countries do not automatically have to grant this right but they do at least have to consider the request.

Your non-EU family members must carry a valid passport at all times and, depending on the country they are from, they may also have to show an entry visa at the border.

There are a number of countries (see Annex II) whose nationals do not need a visa to visit the EU for three months or less. The list of countries whose nationals require visas to travel to Ireland differs slightly from other EU countries.

Contact the consulate or embassy of the country you are travelling to well in advance to find out which documents your non-EU family member will be asked to present at the border.

Read more about your non-EU family members’ residence rights if they move with you to another EU country.

Do your non-EU family members need a visa?

Your non-EU family member can check if they need an entry visa from the country they are travelling to using the tool below:

Do you have a residence document from an EU country?

  • Yes – I have a residence card as an EU national family member issued by an EU country other than the country my EU spouse / partner is a national of
  • Yes – I have a residence document issued by the EU country my EU spouse / partner is a national of
  • No

You don’t have a residence card as an EU national family member – issued by an EU country – or a residence document – issued by an EU country

  • You must have a visa

In what EU country was your residence card issued?

  • Schengen area country (Austria, Belgium, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.)
  • Non-Schengen area country (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Romania)

In what EU country was your residence document issued

  • Schengen area country (Austria, Belgium, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.)
  • Non-Schengen area country (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Romania)

What EU country are you travelling to?

  • Schengen area country (Austria, Belgium, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.)
  • Non-Schengen area country (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Romania)

What EU country are you travelling to?

  • Schengen area country (Austria, Belgium, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.)
  • Non-Schengen area country (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Romania)

What EU country are you travelling to?

  • Schengen area country (Austria, Belgium, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.)
  • Non-Schengen area country (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Romania)

What EU country are you travelling to?

  • Schengen area country (Austria, Belgium, Czechia, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland.)
  • Non-Schengen area country (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Romania)

Your residence card was issued by a Schengen country and you are travelling to a country in the Schengen area

  • You do not need a visa if you have a residence card as an EU national family member issued by an EU country other than the country your EU spouse / partner is a national of

Your residence card issued by a Schengen country and you are travelling to a non-Schengen country

  • You do not need a visa if you have a residence card as an EU national family member issued by an EU country other than the country your EU spouse / partner is a national of. You must either be travelling together with your EU spouse / partner or you are joining them in the non-Schengen country

Warning

If you have a residence card as an EU national family member and you are not accompanying or joining your EU spouse / partner in the non-Schengen country, you must apply for a visa to enter that country.

Sample story

Holders of a residence card as an EU national family member don’t need to obtain a visa if travelling with an EU national

Ying, the Chinese spouse of a German national living in Finland, has been issued with a residence card as an EU national family member in Finland. Ying and her husband wish to travel to Romania for an autumn break. As Ying is travelling with her husband, has a valid passport and a residence card as an EU family member, she is not required to obtain an entry visa to travel to Romania .

Your residence card was issued by a non-Schengen country and you are travelling to a Schengen country

  • You do not need a visa if you have a residence card as an EU national family member issued under by an EU country other than the country your EU spouse / partner is a national of. You must be either travelling together with your EU spouse / partner or you are joining them in the Schengen country

Warning

If you have a residence card as an EU national family member and you are not accompanying or joining your EU spouse / partner in the Schengen country, you must apply for a visa to enter that country.

Exception for Switerland

You will need a visa if you are travelling to Switzerland with a non-EU family member’s residence card issued by a non-Schengen area country – this applies if you are travelling alone, together with your EU spouse / partner or if you are joining them in Switzerland.

Your residence card was issued by a non-Schengen country and you are travelling to a non-Schengen country

  • You do not need a visa if you have a residence card as an EU national family member issued by an EU country other than the country your EU spouse / partner is a national of. You must be either travelling together with your EU spouse / partner or you are joining them in the non-Schengen country

Warning

If you have a residence card as an EU national family member and you are not accompanying or joining your EU spouse / partner in the non-Schengen country, you must apply for a visa to enter that country.

Your residence document was issued by a Schengen country in a standard format in line with EU rules and you are travelling to a Schengen country. Or your residence documents was issued in a non-standard format which has been notified to the EU and is published online in the Public Register of Authentic travel and identity Documents

  • You do not need a visa if you have a residence document (national residence permit) issued under national rules by a Schengen country and you are travelling to a Schengen country.

Your residence document was issued by a Schengen country in a standard format in line with EU rules and you are travelling to a non-Schengen country. Or your residence documents was issued in a non-standard format which has been notified to the EU and is published online in the Public Register of Authentic travel and identity Documents

  • You will need a visa if you are travelling to Ireland
  • You do not need a visa if you are travelling to the non-Schengen countries which unitlaterally recognise certain documents as equivalent to their national visas (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus and Romania)
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Sample story

Even if you have a national residence permit, an entry visa is needed to travel to a non-Schengen country

Joyce, a Nigerian national, lives in the Netherlands with her Dutch husband Luuk. As a family member of a Dutch national, Joyce has been issued with a Dutch residence permit in the Netherlands. Joyce wishes to join Luuk on his next business trip to Dublin. As Ireland is not part of the Schengen area, Joyce is required to obtain an entry visa to travel to Ireland with Luuk.

You have a residence document issued by a non-Schengen country and are travelling to a Schengen country

  • You will need a visa

Your residence document was issued by a non-Schengen country and you are travelling to a non-Schengen country

  • You will need a visa, if you are travelling from a non-Schengen country which unilaterally recognise certain documents as equivalent to their national visas (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, and Romania) to Ireland
  • You will need a visa, if you are travelling from Ireland to a non-Schengen country which unilaterally recognises certain documents as equivalent to their national visas (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus and Romania)
  • You do not need a visa if you travel between the non-Schengen countries which have unilaterally recognised certain documents as equivalent to their national visas (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus and Romania)

Applying for an entry visa for short stays up to 90 days

If your non-EU family members need an entry visa, they should apply for one in advance from the consulate or embassy of the country they wish to travel to. If they will be travelling together with you, or joining you in another EU country, their application should be processed quickly and free of charge:

  • countries which are members of the border-free Schengen area should issue visas within 15 days, except in rare cases, when the authorities should provide an explanation for their decision
  • all other countries (Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Romania) should issues visas as quickly as possible

Warning

Your non-EU family member should clearly indicate on their visa application form that they are applying for an entry visa as a family member of a mobile EU citizen. If this is not clear they may be issued with the wrong type of visa for which they will be charged.

Visa application – supporting documents

Your non-EU family member must include the following documents with their visa application:

  • a valid passport – to prove their identity and nationality
  • a document proving family ties with the EU citizen (e.g. marriage certificate, birth certificate etc.) and dependency (if required)
  • proof that the EU citizen is already living in the host country (if they are joining them)
  • a declaration that the couple will travel together (if the family member will be accompanying the EU citizen)

This list is exhaustive: your non-EU family members cannot be required to produce any other documents to support their application.

(Visas issued by a country belonging to the border-free Schengen area are valid for all countries in that area.)

Warning

If you live outside the EU and your non-EU family members accompany you or travel to the EU country of your nationality, EU cross-border rules do not necessarily apply and your non-EU family members might be charged visa fees.

Arriving at the border without an entry visa

It is always best for your non-EU family members to be well-informed in advance and to have all the necessary documents before starting their journey.

However, if they arrive at the border with their passport but without an entry visa, the border authorities should give them the opportunity to prove by other means that they are family members of a mobile EU citizen. They can do so by providing proof of their identity and family ties with an EU citizen (for example a marriage or birth certificate) and, proof that they are joining or accompanying the EU citizen (for example, proof that the EU citizen is already living in the country where entry is sought). If they manage to prove it, they should be issued with an entry visa on the spot.

Open as an external link

If your family members are having difficulties getting a visa, you can contact our assistance services.

Entry refusal

In very rare cases, an EU country can refuse entry to you or your family members for reasons of “public policy, public security or public health”.

If this happens, the authorities must prove that you or your family members pose a “genuine, present and sufficiently serious threat”.

You are entitled to receive this decision in writing, stating all the grounds, and specifying how you can appeal and by when.

Do You Need Your Original Birth Certificate For a Passport?

Do You Need Your Original Birth Certificate For a Passport?

All US passport services require passport applicants to submit proof of citizenship along with other documents. But is providing your original birth certificate to get your U.S. passport absolutely necessary? Not really.

You can prove your U.S. citizenship either through primary or secondary citizenship evidence.

Below we will go over the two types of proof of U.S. citizenship for those who were born in and outside the United States.

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If you were born in the United States

The acceptable proof of citizenship somewhat differs depending whether you were born in or outside the U.S. First we will go over both primary and secondary U.S. citizenship proof for US-born citizens submitting a passport application.

Primary citizenship evidence

The following documents are examples of primary citizenship evidence you can use when applying for a passport if your place of birth is the United States. You only need to submit one of the two:

  1. 1. an original or certified copy of your long-form birth certificate* showing birth in the United States that fulfills all of the following criteria:
    • issued by the city, county, or state where you were born
    • includes your full name as well as your date and place of birth
    • includes your parent(s)’ full names
    • includes the signature of the city, county, or state registrar
    • has the date filed with the registrar’s office within one year of birth
    • has the seal of the issuing authority

*a hospital-issued birth certificate is not considered an original one and won’t be accepted as a primary document. Some states also issue birth abstracts (summaries of original birth records), however not all of them meet the above requirements, and some supplemental documentation may be necessary.

  • 2. a legitimate, undamaged U.S. passport (it can be expired)

Secondary citizenship evidence

If you were born in the United States and don’t have an original copy (or a certified one) of your birth certificate or a U.S. passport, you can submit secondary evidence with your passport application to prove your citizenship. Keep in mind that you must provide either a delayed certificate of birth or a Letter of No Record with early public records.

  • 1. a delayed birth certificate (filed more than 1 year after your birth) with the following:
  • – the birth attendant’s signature or an affidavit signed by the parent(s)
  • – documentation that was used to create it (preferably early public records, more information below)

If your delayed birth certificate doesn’t have the above, you’ll have to submit it together with early public records.

  • 2. Letter of No Record – if there is no certified birth certificate on file in your state of birth, you will be issued a Letter of No Record by the registrar. This document must:
  • – be issued by the state
  • – have your full name and date of birth
  • – include the years for which a birth record was sought
  • – include a note stating that there is no birth certificate on file
  • – along with the Letter of No Record you must include at least 2 (two) early public records, or 1 (one) early public record and one early private record with Form DS-10: Birth Affidavit
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Early public or private documents

Early public or private records are those records that were issued early in your life (ideally in the first five years). They should include your full name, as well as date and place of birth. Some examples of early documents are:

  • – a birth certificate issued by the hospital
  • – U.S. Census record
  • – Baptism certificate
  • – early school records
  • – a family Bible record
  • – medical records of post-natal care
  • – Form DS-10 – Birth Affidavit (if your birth in the U.S. was recorded more than a year late or if you have a Letter of No Record)

If you were born outside of the United States

If you’re a foreign-born U.S. citizen, you also have primary and secondary citizenship evidence that you can use when you apply for a passport.

Keep in mind that all foreign documents must include an English translation by a professional, along with a notarized certification stating the accuracy of the translation as well as a self-certification provided by the translator to state their ability to translate such documents.

Be prepared to provide any additional documentation required by the passport agency.

We’ll cover the types of documents you can use to prove your U.S. citizenship, both primary and secondary.

Going abroad and need a passport? Check out our other articles for more guidance:

  • What Documents Do I Need to Get a Passport?
  • How To Apply For a Passport for an Adopted Child?
  • How to Get a Child’s Passport with One Parent Absent
  • Can You Get a Passport With a Bench Warrant?
  • Renew U.S. Passport – Your Ultimate Guide for Adult Renewals
  • Passport for a Baby in Texas – How to Apply
  • Oh No! My Passport Photo Was Rejected!

Primary citizenship evidence

For U.S. citizens who were born abroad, one of the following 4 (four) primary documents can be used as proof of citizenship:

  • – a legitimate, undamaged U.S. passport (it can be expired)
  • – Consular Report of Birth Abroad/Certification of Birth
  • – Certificate of Naturalization
  • – Certificate of Citizenship

Secondary citizenship evidence

If you were born abroad, secondary documents that can be used to prove your citizenship depend on how you obtained U.S. citizenship. We’ll cover each one of them in detail below.

If you obtained citizenship through citizen parent(s)

The following documents should be submitted with your passport application if you were born outside of the United States and gained U.S. citizenship through one or both citizen parents:

  • – your foreign birth certificate including the name(s) of your parent(s)
  • if applicable, submit your parents’ marriage certificate
  • – a statement by your U.S. citizen parent or parents, which details all periods and locations where they resided or were physically present in the – U.S. and abroad prior to your birth
  • – your parent’s or parents’ proof of U.S. citizenship

If you obtained citizenship through the Naturalization of your parent

The following documents should be submitted with your passport application if you were born outside of the United States and gained U.S. citizenship through the Naturalization of one or both of your citizen parents:

  • – your foreign birth certificate including the name(s) of your parent(s)
  • – your parent’s or parents’ Naturalization Certificate
  • – proof of your permanent residence status (this could either be a Permanent Resident Card/Green Card or your foreign passport that includes the original I-551 visa entry stamp)
  • – if your parents got married before your 18th birthday and if they were married when you legally entered the United States, you’ll need to provide their marriage certificate
  • – if your parents weren’t married when you legally entered the United States, you’ll need to provide documentation of legal custody
  • if your parents weren’t married when you were born, you’ll need to provide evidence of your legitimation, such as your parents’ marriage certificate dated after you were born or a certified court order of legitimation

If you obtained citizenship through adoption

If you were born outside the U.S. and became a U.S. citizen through a citizen parent or parents before your 16th birthday, you should submit the following paperwork when applying for a passport:

  • – evidence of your parent(s)’ U.S. citizenship
  • – your full adoption decree
  • – evidence of your lawful entry for permanent residence, such as your – passport from when you entered the U.S. as a child with the ADIT stamp or Form I-94 with picture and the ADIT stamp)

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Wrap-up

To sum up, as you’ve learned from our post, original birth certificates are not the only way to prove your U.S. citizenship. There are plenty of other documents you can use, including a certified copy of your birth certificate as well as other primary or secondary documents.

Review our lists to learn about the acceptable forms of U.S. citizenship evidence that you can use if you don’t have your long form birth certificate at hand.

Do I need to submit my original birth certificate to prove my citizenship when applying for a U.S. passport?

No – there are other alternatives to proving that you are a U.S. citizen than with the original copy of your birth certificate. However, if you are submitting your original U.S. birth certificate, remember that only long form birth certificates are considered primary documents and don’t require any other supplemental documentation.

What if there’s no birth certificate on file in the state I was born?

Those applicants who don’t have birth certificates on file will be issued a Letter of No Record. Remember that it should be filed together with either (two) early public records, or 1 (one) early public record and one early private record with Form DS-10 – Birth Affidavit.

Can I submit my hospital-issued U.S. birth certificate when applying for a new passport?

A hospital-issued certificate of birth is considered a secondary document, therefore you would have to submit it with supporting documents.

I’m a U.S. citizen, but wasn’t born in the United States. Do I have to submit my parents’ marriage certificate when applying for a passport?

If you weren’t born in the U.S. you will have to provide the marriage certificate of your parents only if you gained citizenship through your citizen parent (either US-born or naturalized), however not if you became a U.S. citizen through adoption.

I was born outside of the U.S. – will my Consular Report of Birth Abroad suffice in proving my citizenship?

Yes. A Consular Report of Birth Abroad is considered a primary document of citizenship evidence.

Source https://www.mea-india.in/birth-certificate-apostille-for-Netherlands/

Source https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/travel/entry-exit/non-eu-family/index_en.htm

Source https://passport-photo.online/blog/original-birth-certificate-passport/

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