Malaria Prevention and Antimalarials for Travellers

Ready to Travel?
Schedule
Now!

Malaria
Country
List

Mosquito
Prevention
Options

What Is Malaria?

Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by parasites. Left untreated, it can lead to death. Over 500 cases are diagnosed in Canada every year. The vast majority of these cases are among travellers returning from countries with the disease.

Globally, more than 215 million cases are reported each year with more than 400,000 deaths. Malaria is one of the most deadly infections in the history of the world.

What Are Antimalarials?

Antimalarials, or malaria pills, prevent the malaria parasite from taking root in the body. Unlike a vaccination, antimalarials must be taken on a regular basis.

A wide variety of antimalarial medications are available. Due to drug resistance and differences in malaria strains, a travel health specialist can help you identify the best medication for your trip.

Be sure to visit with a Passport Health travel specialist at least four to six weeks before travel.

Who Should Use Antimalarials?

Anyone travelling to a region with malaria should consider antimalarial medication. Even if you were born in a country with malaria and since moved to Canada, consult with a travel health specialist on need.

But, not every antimalarial is suited to everyone. A specialist can help you determine which malaria medication is right for you and your trip.

Call or book online now to learn more or receive antimalarial medication.

Customer Reviews

“ Courageous Nurse “
“The admissions process was smooth. With the RN ready for me on time and with a smile. She was the only person I talked to at the clinic, thus, this review will be about her. Very knowledgeable and insightful, She explained to me all the medications and the reason for taking them. Did not shy away from any questions, including possible side affects of Malaria Pills.”

“ Pleasant Experience “
“The necessary country research had been done, along with a cross-referencing of my vaccination history. The discussion was informed, and I got the shots I needed, as well as a prescription for anti-malarials. No upselling, which I have experienced at other travel vaccination centres, which was nice. When I said I didn’t want certain shots, there was no opposition. Very pleasant staff, and quickly found what she needed. Consultation with her supervisor was fast.”

“ Easy and Online “
“This was the third clinic visit for malaria pills for another destination and each time was booked online and the appointment was right on schedule. Everything was professional and friendly and a good experience. Thanks.”

“ Worth It “
“The nurse was very knowledgeable and easy to talk to. She explained everything very well. I am grateful that they had brand-name antimalarial pills on site. She gave me a small folder of precautions about travelling abroad.”

“ Learned Something New “
“I’ve never been to a travel clinic before, but I certainly learned a lot about being safe when travelling. Especially to a country where health practices are more relaxed than ours, and there’s higher risks of disease like Malaria and Yellow Fever.”

“ Great Visit “
“I wanted to say that I had a wonderful visit at your clinic today. I went to get a consultation about yellow fever and malaria for my trip to bolivia in general. The lady who helped me was super useful and gave me tons of information.”

“ Excellent service “
“The nurse carefully reviewed the parts of the country I will be visiting (with respect to malaria threats). There was no “upselling” – just good advice. Very professional and pleasant.”

“ Great Service “
“Great service, detailed explanations of everything including our antimalarial medicaiton, provided all needed information and requested vaccines for my travel.”

“ A good experience. “
“Overall the service was good. The first nurse who gave us our antimalarials did a wonderful job. Thank you!”

“ Great Help! “
“Great experiance, great nurse, gave us all options. On time service. She understood we have travelled to Africa many times but still went over all options available to us for Malaria tablets.”

How Does Malaria Spread?

Mosquitoes are the most common vector for malaria. An infected mosquito will bite a human and leave behind the malaria parasite. Only some species of mosquito can carry the disease making some areas virtually malaria-free.

It is possible for malaria to be spread through blood transfusion, transplant or sharing of needles. It can also spread from mother to unborn infant before or during delivery.

Health organizations recommend antimalarials and proper use of mosquito repellents or netting.

Where Is Malaria Found?

Map of malaria transmission

Source: MAP, PHAC

Malaria is found in many regions of the world. Central America, Africa and Asia all have large areas with at least moderate risk of infection. Generally, the disease is most common in warmer areas near the equator.

Regions with the highest transmission are Africa, south of the Sahara, and parts of Oceania like Papua New Guinea.

Some popular destinations with malaria present are:

  • Central America – Mexico, Costa Rica, Panama
  • South America – Peru, Brazil, Ecuador
  • Africa – Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya
  • West Asia – Saudi Arabia, Iran, Turkey
  • East Asia – India, Thailand, China
Read Post  International travel to resume, high-risk countries excluded

To find out if your destination is at risk for malaria, see our destination advice portal.

What Are the Symptoms of Malaria?

Once a person is infected, it can take seven to 30 days to start showing symptoms of malaria. Be sure to tell any healthcare providers that you were in a region with malaria when seeing them up to a year after your trip.

Most malaria infections come in three stages:

  • Cold Stage – Individuals experience a sensation of cold and shivering.
  • Hot Stage – This commonly brings fever, headaches and vomiting. Seizures can occur in young children.
  • Sweating Stage – Patients will sweat and begin to return to a normal temperature. Tiredness is common.

Because of the similarity with the flu, misdiagnosis can occur.

Severe malaria is uncommon, but can lead to neurological problems, anemia, blood clotting or kidney failure. Seek immediate medical attention if you suspect someone is experiencing a severe case of the disease.

Is There a Malaria Vaccine?

A number of malaria vaccines are in various stages of study or development but are not yet available for the general public. RTS,S/AS01 has recently been approved for very specific use in Africa. See the WHO malaria vaccination portal to learn more.

Where Can I Get Antimalarials?

Antimalarials are available by prescription-only. Some Passport Health locations offer onsite, while others may call in your prescription to a pharmacy. This varies from state-to-state based on local regulations. Call or book online now to learn more and schedule your appointment today!

Medication to pack while travelling in Africa

Before you embark on a journey to any part of the world, you have to pack all the necessary stuff – clothes, gadgets and documents. Maybe you put in a little medication to help you kill a headache or stop a cold. You don’t really need a lot of medication, right? Travelling is all about enjoyment, not ingesting pills. But although packing medication sounds boring, it is a necessary precaution. It is much better to have some remedies nearby, just in case you get ill. With that said, here’s some medication to help ensure healthy travels in the African continent. (Once you’ve got that bit covered, check out this guide to budgeting and planning your next trip.)

1. Antimalarials

doxycycline antimalarials medication travelling africa

Doxycycline, an affordable antimalarial.

Malaria is a potentially fatal blood disease caused by a parasite that is transmitted to humans by Anopheles mosquitos. The disease claims over 655, 000 lives throughout the globe each year. Sub-Saharan Africa, where a child dies every from malaria every minute, accounts for 90% of the fatalities. In South Africa, areas with a high malaria risk in the country are Limpopo, Mpumalanga and north-eastern KwaZulu Natal.

With these statistics in mind, you might want to consider packing antimalarials when travelling the continent. Antimalarials are prescription drugs that treat or prevent malaria from entering the bloodstream.

The most common antimalarials are Vibramycin-D (Doxycycline), Lariam(mefloquine) and Aralen ( chloroquine). You may be required to begin taking the medication two weeks before travelling to malaria-stricken area.

2. Painkillers

aspirin medication- ravelling africa

Aspirin is a traveller’s best friend.

Who knows what kinds of aches and pains you’ll encounter while travelling? From an old knee injury to a splitting headache, pain is one of the easiest ways to stop fun in its tracks. To prevent such things from happening, make sure you always have some aspirin, paracetemol or ibuprofen nearby.

3. Motion sickness tablets

motion-sickness-medication-travelling-africa

Carrying motion sickness tablets will make travelling much more enjoyable.

Motion sickness (kinetosis) is the disturbance to the inner ear which controls equilibrium and balance caused by repeated movement. There are various kinds of motion sickness but the most common are car sickness, sea sickness and air sickness.

If you suffer from motion sickness, it is important to pack medication when travelling in Africa. Distances in African continent are formidable, and you often have to ride for long hours to get from point A to B. The roads are bumpy and rough, the airline health assistance is not that great, and getting sick on a boat off the coast of Mozambique is the last thing you need.

Motion sickness remedies like codeine (Promethazine), Marezine (Cyclizine) and Dramamine (Dimenhydrinate) are available over the counter. Pregnant women must consult with health practitioners before using motion sickness tablets.

4. Allergy treatment drugs (antihistamines)

allergy-medication-antihistamines-medication-travelling-africa-4

Antihistamines(allergy treatment drugs) help treat allergic reaction.

You’re in Tanzania and you eat a plate of food with karanga‘ (peanuts in Swahili) in it. This triggers your violent peanut allergy instantly. Now you’re spending your holiday swollen and itchy, or seriously ill. However, if you take antihistamines (allergy treatment drugs), you could still enjoy your vacation. If you want to experience Africa to the fullest, it’s important to prepare for any allergic reaction. Antihistamines such as Allegra, Allegra Zyrtec and Claritin are available over the counter. Ginger and vinegar can also help combat mild allergic reactions.

6. Antiseptics

antiseptic medication travel africa

Antiseptics such as Dettol prevent superficial infections.

Antiseptics such as Betadine, Dettol or Savlon are a must when travelling anywhere in the world. However, in Africa, travelling without any antiseptic could be a major health risk. With overcrowded settlements, poor hygiene and bacteria circulating, an uncleaned wound or cut is the last thing you need. There is a lack of healthcare facilities in the continent so if you end up waiting for assistance, it’s much better to be able to help yourself.

8. Oral Rehydration salts

oral-rehydration-salts-travel-medicationpack-travel-8

Oral rehydration salts help prevent dehydration.

Poor sanitation, lack of clean water and poor hygiene have led to the increase in cholera and diarrhoea in the African continent. In 2011, a total 589 854 cases of cholera were reported to the World Health Organisation by 58 countries from all continents and 32% them were reported from Africa. Last year, 62 people died in Sierra Leone in less than a month due to a cholera outbreak.

Read Post  How many destinations does african travel inc travel to

Diarrhoea, on the other hand, accounts for 2.2 millions deaths world with 7.78 % of them occurring in Africa. Most the people that deaths from these conditions are caused by dehydration. (For more statistics, visit the World Health Organisation website)

Based on the statistics, it is highly advisable to bring oral rehydration salts. These rehydration salts help replace lost electrocytes, sodium, glucose and potassium that people lose when they suffer from cholera or diarrhea. Oral rehydration salts sachets or tablets are available over the counter or through prescription. (Read: How to prevent traveller’s diarrhoea)

Also: they’re a great help if you find yourself grossly hungover after too much local beer.

9. Laxatives

laxatives-medication-to-pack-travelling-africa-6

Look, it’s better to have laxatives and not need them.

You might want to taste new food or simply eat food on the go while travelling in the African continent. Some of the food might cause constipation or irritation in your belly. That is where laxatives come in and cleanse your system. Yeah, it’s not glamorous, but much better than needing them and not having anything, right? Whether in liquid, capsules or as pills, most laxatives can be purchased over the over the counter.

10. Mild Sedatives

melatonin-sedatives-medication-travelling-africa-7

Melatonin (mild sedative) helps combat jetlag and sleeplessness.

Tsetse flies, mosquitos and high temperatures are some causes of sleeping problems in Africa. To help ensure undisturbed sleeping patterns, it is important to pack mild sedatives. Although sedatives like Melatonin are available over the counter, it is important to consult a health practitioner before taking them. (Read How to avoid jetlag )

11. Sun protection

sun-protection-medication-pack-travelling-africa-9

Protect your skin from the African sun with something like this.

To prevent the scorching African heat from damaging your skin, its important to carry sun protection (sunscreen) with a high sun protection factor. In South Africa, the recommended sun protection factor (SPF) is 15 and above.

12. Rabies immune globulin

human-rabies-Immunoglobulin-medication-travel-africa -10

Rabies immune globulin prevents the virus from spreading in a victim’s body.

Rabies is a disease caused by a virus transmitted from an animal to a human. Abnormal behaviour, severe muscle spasms and an inability to swallow are some of the symptoms associated with the disease. 55 000 people die each year die from rabies each year, and Africa and Asia account for 95% of the deaths.

In Africa, especially in the rural areas, where most rabies cases are not reported, there is a lack of mobile health services in these area. Before you visit a village in Tanzania or anywhere in the continent, make sure you pack rabies immune globulin. (For more information, visit the World Health Organisation website)

13. Antifungal treatment

fungal-treatment-medication-travelling-africa-12

Antifungal treatment is must-have when travelling in Africa.

A fungal infection is an inflammatory condition where fungi multiply on the skin, genitals or lungs. Fungal infections such as ringworms and meningitis are quite common in West and Northern Africa. To avoid fungal infections, people travelling in the continent should carry drugs such as Cruex cream and micanazole. Amphotericin B and voriconazole are also useful in treating fungal meningitis.

14. Antibiotics

antibiotic-medication-pack-travelling-africa-13

Antibiotics help combat bacterial infections.

Antibiotics are important when travelling, not just in Africa but anywhere in the world. Antibiotics are drugs used for treatment infections caused by bacteria, from a simple ear infection to more serious infections like pneumonia. Antibiotics break down the bacteria before it becomes a threat to your immune system. The most common antibiotics are penicillin, amoxicillin and benzylpenicilllin. If you’re travelling to South Africa, where swine flu (H1N1) outbreaks have occurred in the last few years, prescription antivirals such as Tamiflu and Relanza should be part of your travel kit.

Medication to pack while travelling in Africa

Before you embark on a journey to any part of the world, you have to pack all the necessary stuff – clothes, gadgets and documents. Maybe you put in a little medication to help you kill a headache or stop a cold. You don’t really need a lot of medication, right? Travelling is all about enjoyment, not ingesting pills. But although packing medication sounds boring, it is a necessary precaution. It is much better to have some remedies nearby, just in case you get ill. With that said, here’s some medication to help ensure healthy travels in the African continent. (Once you’ve got that bit covered, check out this guide to budgeting and planning your next trip.)

1. Antimalarials

doxycycline antimalarials medication travelling africa

Doxycycline, an affordable antimalarial.

Malaria is a potentially fatal blood disease caused by a parasite that is transmitted to humans by Anopheles mosquitos. The disease claims over 655, 000 lives throughout the globe each year. Sub-Saharan Africa, where a child dies every from malaria every minute, accounts for 90% of the fatalities. In South Africa, areas with a high malaria risk in the country are Limpopo, Mpumalanga and north-eastern KwaZulu Natal.

With these statistics in mind, you might want to consider packing antimalarials when travelling the continent. Antimalarials are prescription drugs that treat or prevent malaria from entering the bloodstream.

The most common antimalarials are Vibramycin-D (Doxycycline), Lariam(mefloquine) and Aralen ( chloroquine). You may be required to begin taking the medication two weeks before travelling to malaria-stricken area.

2. Painkillers

aspirin medication- ravelling africa

Aspirin is a traveller’s best friend.

Who knows what kinds of aches and pains you’ll encounter while travelling? From an old knee injury to a splitting headache, pain is one of the easiest ways to stop fun in its tracks. To prevent such things from happening, make sure you always have some aspirin, paracetemol or ibuprofen nearby.

3. Motion sickness tablets

motion-sickness-medication-travelling-africa

Carrying motion sickness tablets will make travelling much more enjoyable.

Motion sickness (kinetosis) is the disturbance to the inner ear which controls equilibrium and balance caused by repeated movement. There are various kinds of motion sickness but the most common are car sickness, sea sickness and air sickness.

If you suffer from motion sickness, it is important to pack medication when travelling in Africa. Distances in African continent are formidable, and you often have to ride for long hours to get from point A to B. The roads are bumpy and rough, the airline health assistance is not that great, and getting sick on a boat off the coast of Mozambique is the last thing you need.

Read Post  Guion Bluford: First African-American in Space

Motion sickness remedies like codeine (Promethazine), Marezine (Cyclizine) and Dramamine (Dimenhydrinate) are available over the counter. Pregnant women must consult with health practitioners before using motion sickness tablets.

4. Allergy treatment drugs (antihistamines)

allergy-medication-antihistamines-medication-travelling-africa-4

Antihistamines(allergy treatment drugs) help treat allergic reaction.

You’re in Tanzania and you eat a plate of food with karanga‘ (peanuts in Swahili) in it. This triggers your violent peanut allergy instantly. Now you’re spending your holiday swollen and itchy, or seriously ill. However, if you take antihistamines (allergy treatment drugs), you could still enjoy your vacation. If you want to experience Africa to the fullest, it’s important to prepare for any allergic reaction. Antihistamines such as Allegra, Allegra Zyrtec and Claritin are available over the counter. Ginger and vinegar can also help combat mild allergic reactions.

6. Antiseptics

antiseptic medication travel africa

Antiseptics such as Dettol prevent superficial infections.

Antiseptics such as Betadine, Dettol or Savlon are a must when travelling anywhere in the world. However, in Africa, travelling without any antiseptic could be a major health risk. With overcrowded settlements, poor hygiene and bacteria circulating, an uncleaned wound or cut is the last thing you need. There is a lack of healthcare facilities in the continent so if you end up waiting for assistance, it’s much better to be able to help yourself.

8. Oral Rehydration salts

oral-rehydration-salts-travel-medicationpack-travel-8

Oral rehydration salts help prevent dehydration.

Poor sanitation, lack of clean water and poor hygiene have led to the increase in cholera and diarrhoea in the African continent. In 2011, a total 589 854 cases of cholera were reported to the World Health Organisation by 58 countries from all continents and 32% them were reported from Africa. Last year, 62 people died in Sierra Leone in less than a month due to a cholera outbreak.

Diarrhoea, on the other hand, accounts for 2.2 millions deaths world with 7.78 % of them occurring in Africa. Most the people that deaths from these conditions are caused by dehydration. (For more statistics, visit the World Health Organisation website)

Based on the statistics, it is highly advisable to bring oral rehydration salts. These rehydration salts help replace lost electrocytes, sodium, glucose and potassium that people lose when they suffer from cholera or diarrhea. Oral rehydration salts sachets or tablets are available over the counter or through prescription. (Read: How to prevent traveller’s diarrhoea)

Also: they’re a great help if you find yourself grossly hungover after too much local beer.

9. Laxatives

laxatives-medication-to-pack-travelling-africa-6

Look, it’s better to have laxatives and not need them.

You might want to taste new food or simply eat food on the go while travelling in the African continent. Some of the food might cause constipation or irritation in your belly. That is where laxatives come in and cleanse your system. Yeah, it’s not glamorous, but much better than needing them and not having anything, right? Whether in liquid, capsules or as pills, most laxatives can be purchased over the over the counter.

10. Mild Sedatives

melatonin-sedatives-medication-travelling-africa-7

Melatonin (mild sedative) helps combat jetlag and sleeplessness.

Tsetse flies, mosquitos and high temperatures are some causes of sleeping problems in Africa. To help ensure undisturbed sleeping patterns, it is important to pack mild sedatives. Although sedatives like Melatonin are available over the counter, it is important to consult a health practitioner before taking them. (Read How to avoid jetlag )

11. Sun protection

sun-protection-medication-pack-travelling-africa-9

Protect your skin from the African sun with something like this.

To prevent the scorching African heat from damaging your skin, its important to carry sun protection (sunscreen) with a high sun protection factor. In South Africa, the recommended sun protection factor (SPF) is 15 and above.

12. Rabies immune globulin

human-rabies-Immunoglobulin-medication-travel-africa -10

Rabies immune globulin prevents the virus from spreading in a victim’s body.

Rabies is a disease caused by a virus transmitted from an animal to a human. Abnormal behaviour, severe muscle spasms and an inability to swallow are some of the symptoms associated with the disease. 55 000 people die each year die from rabies each year, and Africa and Asia account for 95% of the deaths.

In Africa, especially in the rural areas, where most rabies cases are not reported, there is a lack of mobile health services in these area. Before you visit a village in Tanzania or anywhere in the continent, make sure you pack rabies immune globulin. (For more information, visit the World Health Organisation website)

13. Antifungal treatment

fungal-treatment-medication-travelling-africa-12

Antifungal treatment is must-have when travelling in Africa.

A fungal infection is an inflammatory condition where fungi multiply on the skin, genitals or lungs. Fungal infections such as ringworms and meningitis are quite common in West and Northern Africa. To avoid fungal infections, people travelling in the continent should carry drugs such as Cruex cream and micanazole. Amphotericin B and voriconazole are also useful in treating fungal meningitis.

14. Antibiotics

antibiotic-medication-pack-travelling-africa-13

Antibiotics help combat bacterial infections.

Antibiotics are important when travelling, not just in Africa but anywhere in the world. Antibiotics are drugs used for treatment infections caused by bacteria, from a simple ear infection to more serious infections like pneumonia. Antibiotics break down the bacteria before it becomes a threat to your immune system. The most common antibiotics are penicillin, amoxicillin and benzylpenicilllin. If you’re travelling to South Africa, where swine flu (H1N1) outbreaks have occurred in the last few years, prescription antivirals such as Tamiflu and Relanza should be part of your travel kit.

Source https://www.passporthealthglobal.com/ca/travel-medicine/malaria-prevention/

Source https://www.getaway.co.za/travel-ideas/travel-advice/medication-pack-travel-africa/

Source https://www.getaway.co.za/travel-ideas/travel-advice/medication-pack-travel-africa/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *