## What Happens to Skydiver Velocity When Parachute Opens?

When a skydiver jumps out of a plane, they experience a rapid acceleration due to gravity. This acceleration causes their velocity to increase until they reach a terminal velocity, which is the maximum speed that they can achieve while in freefall. The terminal velocity of a skydiver is typically around 120 miles per hour (193 kilometers per hour).

Once the skydiver opens their parachute, their velocity begins to decrease. This is because the parachute creates drag, which is a force that opposes the motion of the skydiver. The amount of drag that the parachute creates depends on its size, shape, and porosity. A larger parachute will create more drag than a smaller parachute, and a parachute with a more porous canopy will create more drag than a parachute with a less porous canopy.

As the skydiver descends, the drag created by the parachute will cause their velocity to decrease. The rate at which their velocity decreases will depend on the amount of drag that the parachute creates. A parachute that creates a lot of drag will cause the skydiver’s velocity to decrease quickly, while a parachute that creates less drag will cause the skydiver’s velocity to decrease more slowly.

The skydiver’s velocity will continue to decrease until they reach a new terminal velocity. This new terminal velocity will be lower than the terminal velocity that the skydiver achieved in freefall. The terminal velocity of a skydiver with a parachute open is typically around 10 miles per hour (16 kilometers per hour).

Factors that Affect the Skydiver’s Velocity

The following factors can affect the skydiver’s velocity:

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The size of the parachute: A larger parachute will create more drag and cause the skydiver’s velocity to decrease more quickly.
The shape of the parachute: A parachute with a more porous canopy will create more drag and cause the skydiver’s velocity to decrease more quickly.
The porosity of the parachute: A parachute with a more porous canopy will create more drag and cause the skydiver’s velocity to decrease more quickly.
The weight of the skydiver: A heavier skydiver will experience more drag and their velocity will decrease more quickly.
The altitude of the skydiver: The higher the skydiver is, the less air resistance they will experience and their velocity will decrease more slowly.

The Effects of the Parachute on the Skydiver’s Body

When the parachute opens, it can cause the skydiver to experience a number of physical effects. These effects can include:

A sudden deceleration: The sudden deceleration can cause the skydiver’s body to experience a number of forces, including G-forces. These forces can cause the skydiver to feel dizzy, lightheaded, or even black out.
A change in body position: The parachute can cause the skydiver’s body to change position, which can put stress on the skydiver’s muscles and joints.
A feeling of disorientation: The sudden change in velocity and body position can cause the skydiver to feel disoriented.

Conclusion

The opening of a parachute has a significant impact on the skydiver’s velocity. The parachute creates drag, which causes the skydiver’s velocity to decrease. The amount of drag that the parachute creates depends on its size, shape, and porosity. The weight of the skydiver, the altitude of the skydiver, and the atmospheric conditions can also affect the skydiver’s velocity.

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