Table of Contents

Why You Shouldn’t Go Diving Without Certification

Why You Shouldn’t Go Scuba Diving Without Certification

Would you jump into a plane without training and fly off into the sunset? Or perhaps drive away in a vehicle you have never driven before and unlicensed to? From these two examples it would seem crazy to do! But believe it or not, people will happily strap a tank onto their backs and head into the depths without a second thought. Let me give you a few reasons why you should never go scuba diving without certification, and instead seek out some training. We’ll also discuss what you can do without a certification if you are not ready to take that step yet.

Table of Contents

Is It Illegal to Dive Without Certification?

Short answer, no. Scuba diving without certification is not illegal. There is no legal requirement to have a certificate to be able to go scuba diving. Furthermore, in the diving world there is no “Scuba Police” roaming the dive sites in search for uncertified divers. The industry is governed by itself, through the dive shops and dive centers that span the world. Of course, uncertified individuals can still go and purchase equipment or get air fills from compressor shops, as these transactions don’t always imply that person is diving and therefore, they are not checked for diving certification. However, the shops and centers will check for a certificate if the individuals are renting equipment or are looking to go diving with that particular company.

There are countless reasons that people should not go scuba diving without certification, or anything for that matter! Below will just be a few reasons why but also what people can do without a certification.

The Unknown Dangers

“The lack of knowledge always leads to defeat and destruction.”

Sunday Adelaja

Diving in the magnificent underwater world we have here on earth is incredible. You will see things you have never seen before and move in a three-dimensional world at your discretion. How easy it seems to simply put a tank on your back and jump into crystal clear warm waters of the tropics. Surrounded by all manners of species or swimming alongside gigantic whales in the vast expanse of the ocean. It seems easy because it really is, if you have received the correct training which has highlighted the risks associated with diving into the depths.

Some of the unknown dangers to those scuba diving without certification include decompression sickness (DCS), commonly known as “the bends”, this is referring to the build-up of nitrogen in the body upon surfacing. Have you surfaced correctly? How long did you spend down at depth? How deep were you? How fast did you ascend? Did you complete a safety, or decompression, stop? What gases were you breathing? These are just a few of the physical diving question that can be asked if someone has suspected DCS.

Within the body we have some air spaces that are affected by scuba diving, places such as the lungs, ears and sinuses. When uncertified divers are diving, they simply are not aware that diving incorrectly can cause serious injuries and death through a pressure related injury (barotrauma). Injuries sustained in the ear can be everlasting, affecting hearing and balance. Those injuries that take place in the lungs include collapsed lungs or more commonly, over expansion resulting in gas embolisms. Very dangerous stuff.

To add to the ambiguity of both DCS and lung over-expansion injuries, there is no single point at which they may occur. They both can happen at a variety of different points throughout a dive and furthermore, it will affect people differently due to our own body’s physiology. This begins to paint a picture of why training at a reputable dive centre is so important, that you know the risks and can manage them on your own dives.

Required Diving Skills

Scuba diving has a number of skills that need to be “mastered” in-order to ensure an individual is safe to dive with others of similar qualification when not under supervision by dive professionals. These skills are both above the water and below. From setting up equipment correctly and checking its functionality, from doing a pre-dive buddy check, to underwater skills such as maintaining neutral buoyancy and trim, self-rescue skills and buddy rescue skills. For certified divers, they would have received theory classes, confined water training and finally open water training, all the time practicing and developing skills to be safe in the water. An uncertified diver would, highly likely, not have received any of this training and jumped straight into open water and hoping for the best. Perhaps this individual is a natural in the water and is quickly able to comfortably control themselves in the water, but what do they do if their regulator falls out? Or their mask is knocked off? Or they themselves or buddy run out of air down at depth? This is the emphasis of diver training, what to do when the dive does not go to plan. How to manage a situation quickly and effectively to enable a safe return to the surface. While diving by itself is not really hard, it can quickly turn into a terrible situation without the proper training.

Learning dive skills is an essential part of training and as such it needs to be done by someone who has had the training to teach in the correct way, as not to train bad habits that could end in an injury. Whenever you go to a dive centre for training you will be assigned an instructor for that course. Not every instructor can teach every course so your assigned instructor will have specialised in how to teach that specific course. What this means is instructors can provide you with quality training that you will take with you for the rest of your diving journey.

Liability for Others

Scuba diving without certification is bad for you, but it doesn’t stop there. For divers who are uncertified jumping in the water and heading off into the deep, they pose a secondary danger to those other divers around them. And this comes in the form of many things such as being disturbed, causing stress, having to rescue etc. To elaborate the points further, how can un-certified divers cause a disturbance? The obvious way is to interfere with others underwater by getting in the way, whether intentionally or because they are unable to correctly control their position in the water. More disturbances come in the form of doing incorrect procedures above and below the water. Such as kit building and buddy checks, this may be either not done or done poorly which will have been spotted by trained divers. This then means that the other divers are now not concentrating on their own dive which may lead to themselves missing something important and resulting in an accident.

On the topic of scuba diving without certifications, we can link in some divers that have done their initial courses but not any specific training. These divers have so far only been trained to dive in open water and not into wrecks or caves where there is no direct access to the surface. This sort of diving, of course, requires more training and more equipment which the initial diver will not have. These people relate to uncertified divers as they too should not venture into such places as they have not been trained on how to do so.

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Insurance

Like all activities, and in life, it is a very good idea to have insurance to cover you if anything was to happen and result in an injury. It would mean that any bills that are racked up with transport fees, hospital fees and any time in a hyperbaric chamber will be covered and you can relax and focus on recovery. As brilliant as diving insurance is, it will only cover you for what you have been trained for under a well-known dive agency provider such as PADI, SSI, RAID, BSAC etc. Diving beyond your training limits, going deeper or into “decompression” if you should not be, will void your insurance even if you think it was unintentional or was for only a short amount of time. The same goes for uncertified divers, if they went and started diving with a buddy without training, they would not be covered by insurance. Meaning that if something was to happen, all the costs would land back on the uncertified individual who was injured, so not only focusing on recovery they now have the weight on their minds for paying back the fees.

Stay safe and stay insured!

So Why Do People Still Do It?

A very good question, and one that as a diving community we need to address and rectify to try to promote people to go on proper training courses to ensure they are staying safe in the water. There is three main reasons why someone would choose not to go to a training school, they are medical, financial and location.

It goes without saying that scuba diving is a sport that does require a certain amount of fitness and health. This is because we are placing the body into varying pressures, carry heavy equipment and so on. Not to say that you need to be a top athlete because that is simply not true, but you must be medically fit to dive which has been overseen by a diving doctor. The diving medicine world is evolving to create a new understanding of what people can dive with and to what limits, so it is always worth seeing a doctor if you are unsure.

Yes, scuba diving can be expensive. If you go out and buy all the latest equipment, courses and fly all around the world to dive. For most of the diving community this is not a reality. Taking your diving journey step by step and listening to guidance, diving can be a very affordable sport. However, even for some this is not an option, and using old equipment from a distant relative they will simply put the equipment on and jump in the water. Definitely not advisable.

Finally, we have location. There are so many dive centres around nowadays that it is hard not to stumble upon one in your local high street. However, some people live far out of any civilisation that makes it not worth travelling back and forth from to complete a diving course. So having diving equipment available these people may opt to simply go jump in and scuba dive without any training or certification.

For most, prudent and realistic, thinkers we can understand the side of the story about too much cost, poor health or too far to travel. However, we have to remember that diving is not like walking down the road or driving a car. You’ll be down at depth, underwater, with nothing but the equipment on your back and a buddy to help if something goes wrong. So, this is why you should not go diving without certification.

What is Available for Uncertified Divers?

Diving schools or centers operating under one, or many of the diver training agencies will run what is called “Try Dives” or “Discover Scuba”. These are sessions where people with no certifications or experience can put on the equipment and go for a dive. The reason people can do this is because these sessions are run in a very controlled manner by diving professions who will oversee all that is happening, ensuring clients are safe. The ways in which clients are really kept safe is the ratio between clients to an instructor, which is kept very small. Also, the diving is kept to a very sheltered area and the dive is often no deeper than 4m, meaning that, if required, a quick and easy access to the surface is possible. This is a great way for uncertified divers to get their foot in the door, discover this fun sport and to begin their diving journey.

Summary

We have covered a variety of topics as to why you shouldn’t go scuba diving without certification, including those already certified doing things they are not trained for. Topics such as the dangers, skills, liability to others etc. The main points to take away are that Scuba diving is one of the best ways to spend your spare time, exploring the wonders of this great earth from below the water. But to also remember that as humans we are not made for the water and need correct training to ensure not just our safety but the safety of those we dive with. If you don’t want to invest time and money to get the proper training, rather opt for snorkeling instead.

Find Out Medical Conditions That Might Stop You From Scuba Diving

Find Out Medical Conditions That Might Stop You From Scuba Diving

Scuba diving in the beautiful marine is pretty safe compared to most extreme sports. And the security gear is even safer than skydiving’s double safety mechanism.

There’s one caveat, though – while injuries are rare in scuba diving, the sheer atmospheric pressure and loads of other physics-related stuff interacting with your body in deep waters can be uncomfortable for an unhealthy person.

In layman’s terms, scuba diving is a physically and mentally strenuous activity that isn’t for everyone. I’ll explain in detail – then we’ll discuss common medical conditions that prevent you from doing scuba.

What makes scuba diving different from other extreme sports?

According to the 2020 study, Medical Examination of the Recreational SCUBA Diver, “SCUBA diving is an enjoyable and safe sport when it is pursued by healthy, well-trained, disciplined and well-equipped individuals who are comfortable in the water. Since the sport diver is out for recreation, there is no need to take chances or shortcuts with any of these factors.”

Scuba diving is one of the most demanding sports for an unhealthy person because of one factor – water is denser than air. You can get away with a slight error with skydiving and other “above ground” extreme sports, but not with scuba diving.

In scuba diving, your body faces more pressure and exhaustion the deeper you go below sea level. Even with a full oxygen tank, your body deals with various forces like changing atmospheric pressure, which takes a massive toll on your inner ears and lungs.

That said, a relatively healthy human body can easily withstand most of these phenomena. Where exactly do we draw the line for the eligibility criteria?

Who should not go scuba diving?

People with medical issues related to lungs, heart, and brain should not go technical diving. Common conditions include asthma, cardiovascular diseases, pneumothorax, seizures, and diabetes. They may get away with recreational scuba diving if the issues are mild.

Medical Conditions That Stop You From Scuba Diving

Dozens of medical conditions could potentially stop you from scuba diving or other sports. The human body is complicated. So, to make this influx of information easy for you, I’ve categorized the conditions into eight sections.

1. Neurological Problems

People with neurological problems, especially the spinal cord or the peripheral nerves connecting the spinal cord to the brain, aren’t allowed scuba diving. Individuals with a history of seizures also fall in this category.

What medical conditions can stop you from scuba diving?

Spinal Cord

The strictness of these policies is subjective and varies among different locations. Some scuba diving instructors won’t allow you to dive even if you have a clearance certificate from a medical professional.

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Scuba diving is not allowed for a person suffering from epilepsy. If you have been off medication and without a seizure for over 5 years, you might be considered fit to dive. For patients with nocturnal seizures, you have to be off medication for at least 3 years.

These strict rules are enforced because you can potentially have a seizure at any time, even if the possibility is super low.

Major Neurological Conditions:

  • Seizures (less than 5 years)
  • Epilepsy
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Paralysis
  • Cerebrovascular insufficiency
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Aneurysm
  • TIA strokes

2. Cardiovascular (Heart) Problems

Scuba diving is no walk in the park – the change in pressure not only affects your lungs (breathing) but also your heart (blood pressure). Diving can be difficult if you have high blood pressure or other cardiovascular problems.

For example, you can’t scuba dive if you have persistent hypertension, chest pains, and palpitations in addition to high blood pressure. A medical clearance certificate is almost always required in these situations. You can also get the certificate as a precautionary step if you have had cases of heart murmur and premature death in the direct family.

As for the hematological problems, you need to be careful as it increases the chances of getting decompression illness (DCI). It’s recommended to wait 6 months to a year after a heart attack or heart surgery before scuba diving.

Major Cardiovascular Conditions:

  • Coronary artery/heart disease
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Chronic immersion pulmonary edema
  • High blood pressure
  • Implanted cardiac defibrillator
  • Pulmonary hypertension

More minor conditions include using a pacemaker and a single isolated case of pulmonary edema. Hematological problems include chronic anemia.

3. Mental Health & Behavioural Problems

This one is quite tricky because diagnosing behavioral and other mental health problems aren’t cut and dry. Additionally, you won’t be barred from having just about any random mental health condition.

The issue is the seriousness of the problem because that directly correlates to your medication. For example, you should NOT take psychotropic medications while scuba diving. If so, you’ll need medical clearance from a psychiatrist.

What medical conditions can stop you from scuba diving?

Scuba Diving can feel claustrophobic

As I said, these conditions don’t matter as much as their intensity does since so many of these are very hard to evaluate for a scuba diving situation.

For instance, if you have severe depression, bipolar disorder, or psychosis, you might get medical clearance to scuba dive, but it may put your well-being at high risk.

Major Mental Health Conditions:

  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Severe Depression
  • Panic Attacks
  • Severe issues of drug and alcohol abuse
  • Claustrophobia/agoraphobia

4. Respiratory & Pulmonary Problems

You shouldn’t go scuba diving if you have asthma, as the conditions that might lead to an asthma attack are inherent to scuba diving. These attacks can tighten the airflow by constricting the muscles, which isn’t ideal underwater because it can lead to drowning.

Other pulmonary ailments are just as dangerous because they place a tremendous toll on your lungs and other parts of the respiratory system. This strain can often result in pulmonary over-inflation and alveolar ruptures – both of which can be fatal underwater.

An alveolar rupture is dangerous because it can accidentally bypass air in the bloodstream, leading to an arterial gas embolism (AGE). And an embolism like that underwater is the recipe for a stroke attack.

Major Respiratory Conditions:

  • Pneumothorax
  • Pulmonary hypertension
  • Asthma
  • Thoracic surgery
  • Lung disease

5. Gastrointestinal & Metabolic Problems

It might sound far-fetched, but diabetes can prevent you from scuba diving. Severely diabetic or obese (BMI above 30) individuals usually can’t scuba dive in the United States because it can be fatal if your blood sugar levels are off.

Also, gastrointestinal problems / conditions are an absolute NO for scuba diving. Any gastrointestinal condition that leads to acid reflux, vomiting, perforation, and diarrhea will immediately get you off the boat – and for good reason because even one of these outcomes is enough to drown you.

Ps…pregnancy also prevents you from scuba diving.

6. Cancer Problems

You should not attempt scuba diving while on chemotherapy because chemo and radiation therapy are exhausting and bring your stamina levels to zero. Ideally, wait until after you’re fully recovered from the effects of your therapy.

Since cancer isn’t an exact problem, the scuba restrictions are variable as well. People with brain, lung, or colon cancer MIGHT have to leave scuba diving forever. Comparatively, individuals with other cancer types only require a medical clearance certificate to dive, provided that they’re healthy and have enough stamina.

7. Other Miscellaneous Problems

Musculoskeletal problems such as amputated legs and scoliosis can prevent you from scuba diving because you need the ability to move around, especially in colder waters with such heavy gear. Other such issues include disc prolapse, aseptic necrosis, and severe back pain.

You also need to be otolaryngological healthy to scuba dive. Since inner ears are inflexible like solids, they’re susceptible to rupturing as you go deeper. It’s also why you shouldn’t take scuba dives until sometime after inner ear surgery.

What should you not do after scuba diving?

As long as we’re on the topic of preventing scuba mishaps, here are the things you should not do after scuba diving.

1. Don’t go mountain climbing, skydiving, or other such activities

You must know by now that change in altitude has varying yet astounding impacts. Mountain climbing in the first 24 hours of scuba diving can even result in decompression sickness.

The same goes for skydiving, zip-lining, and related activities. Stick to the ground for the first 24 hours and avoid changing the elevation further. Although, you can skydive (and mountain climb, etc.) prior to scuba diving.

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2. Don’t consume alcohol

Avoid alcohol (or at least don’t drink heavily) during the first 24 hours. Avoid any activity that causes dehydration because it also leads to decompression sickness.

3. Avoid massages right after diving

You may want that relaxing massage after a tiresome day of scuba diving. Still, you should ideally avoid it for the first 24 hours. And if you can’t avoid it, just get the normal one – deep tissue massages should be avoided at all costs. Deep tissue massages can mask the symptoms of decompression sickness and lead to a misdiagnosis.

  • Categories

I got into extreme sports about 20 years ago and am a die-hard adrenaline junkie. Just like in business, I choose my outdoor adventures based on how much they scare me. My goal is to share the lessons I’ve learned over the past couple of decades braving the unknown to encourage you to do the same.

Disclaimer

All content cited is derived from their respective sources. If you believe we have used your copyrighted content without permission, send me an email at [email protected] and I’ll remove it immediately.

About Us

Elevated Adventurer is your go-to sherpa for all things adventure sports and outdoor exploration. Here you’ll learn everything you need to know about your favorite outdoor sports from rock climbing and scuba to skydiving and extreme sports.

Find Out Medical Conditions That Might Stop You From Scuba Diving

Find Out Medical Conditions That Might Stop You From Scuba Diving

Scuba diving in the beautiful marine is pretty safe compared to most extreme sports. And the security gear is even safer than skydiving’s double safety mechanism.

There’s one caveat, though – while injuries are rare in scuba diving, the sheer atmospheric pressure and loads of other physics-related stuff interacting with your body in deep waters can be uncomfortable for an unhealthy person.

In layman’s terms, scuba diving is a physically and mentally strenuous activity that isn’t for everyone. I’ll explain in detail – then we’ll discuss common medical conditions that prevent you from doing scuba.

What makes scuba diving different from other extreme sports?

According to the 2020 study, Medical Examination of the Recreational SCUBA Diver, “SCUBA diving is an enjoyable and safe sport when it is pursued by healthy, well-trained, disciplined and well-equipped individuals who are comfortable in the water. Since the sport diver is out for recreation, there is no need to take chances or shortcuts with any of these factors.”

Scuba diving is one of the most demanding sports for an unhealthy person because of one factor – water is denser than air. You can get away with a slight error with skydiving and other “above ground” extreme sports, but not with scuba diving.

In scuba diving, your body faces more pressure and exhaustion the deeper you go below sea level. Even with a full oxygen tank, your body deals with various forces like changing atmospheric pressure, which takes a massive toll on your inner ears and lungs.

Read Post  Are Scuba Tanks Filled with Pure Oxygen?

That said, a relatively healthy human body can easily withstand most of these phenomena. Where exactly do we draw the line for the eligibility criteria?

Who should not go scuba diving?

People with medical issues related to lungs, heart, and brain should not go technical diving. Common conditions include asthma, cardiovascular diseases, pneumothorax, seizures, and diabetes. They may get away with recreational scuba diving if the issues are mild.

Medical Conditions That Stop You From Scuba Diving

Dozens of medical conditions could potentially stop you from scuba diving or other sports. The human body is complicated. So, to make this influx of information easy for you, I’ve categorized the conditions into eight sections.

1. Neurological Problems

People with neurological problems, especially the spinal cord or the peripheral nerves connecting the spinal cord to the brain, aren’t allowed scuba diving. Individuals with a history of seizures also fall in this category.

What medical conditions can stop you from scuba diving?

Spinal Cord

The strictness of these policies is subjective and varies among different locations. Some scuba diving instructors won’t allow you to dive even if you have a clearance certificate from a medical professional.

Scuba diving is not allowed for a person suffering from epilepsy. If you have been off medication and without a seizure for over 5 years, you might be considered fit to dive. For patients with nocturnal seizures, you have to be off medication for at least 3 years.

These strict rules are enforced because you can potentially have a seizure at any time, even if the possibility is super low.

Major Neurological Conditions:

  • Seizures (less than 5 years)
  • Epilepsy
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Paralysis
  • Cerebrovascular insufficiency
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Aneurysm
  • TIA strokes

2. Cardiovascular (Heart) Problems

Scuba diving is no walk in the park – the change in pressure not only affects your lungs (breathing) but also your heart (blood pressure). Diving can be difficult if you have high blood pressure or other cardiovascular problems.

For example, you can’t scuba dive if you have persistent hypertension, chest pains, and palpitations in addition to high blood pressure. A medical clearance certificate is almost always required in these situations. You can also get the certificate as a precautionary step if you have had cases of heart murmur and premature death in the direct family.

As for the hematological problems, you need to be careful as it increases the chances of getting decompression illness (DCI). It’s recommended to wait 6 months to a year after a heart attack or heart surgery before scuba diving.

Major Cardiovascular Conditions:

  • Coronary artery/heart disease
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Chronic immersion pulmonary edema
  • High blood pressure
  • Implanted cardiac defibrillator
  • Pulmonary hypertension

More minor conditions include using a pacemaker and a single isolated case of pulmonary edema. Hematological problems include chronic anemia.

3. Mental Health & Behavioural Problems

This one is quite tricky because diagnosing behavioral and other mental health problems aren’t cut and dry. Additionally, you won’t be barred from having just about any random mental health condition.

The issue is the seriousness of the problem because that directly correlates to your medication. For example, you should NOT take psychotropic medications while scuba diving. If so, you’ll need medical clearance from a psychiatrist.

What medical conditions can stop you from scuba diving?

Scuba Diving can feel claustrophobic

As I said, these conditions don’t matter as much as their intensity does since so many of these are very hard to evaluate for a scuba diving situation.

For instance, if you have severe depression, bipolar disorder, or psychosis, you might get medical clearance to scuba dive, but it may put your well-being at high risk.

Major Mental Health Conditions:

  • Psychosis
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Severe Depression
  • Panic Attacks
  • Severe issues of drug and alcohol abuse
  • Claustrophobia/agoraphobia

4. Respiratory & Pulmonary Problems

You shouldn’t go scuba diving if you have asthma, as the conditions that might lead to an asthma attack are inherent to scuba diving. These attacks can tighten the airflow by constricting the muscles, which isn’t ideal underwater because it can lead to drowning.

Other pulmonary ailments are just as dangerous because they place a tremendous toll on your lungs and other parts of the respiratory system. This strain can often result in pulmonary over-inflation and alveolar ruptures – both of which can be fatal underwater.

An alveolar rupture is dangerous because it can accidentally bypass air in the bloodstream, leading to an arterial gas embolism (AGE). And an embolism like that underwater is the recipe for a stroke attack.

Major Respiratory Conditions:

  • Pneumothorax
  • Pulmonary hypertension
  • Asthma
  • Thoracic surgery
  • Lung disease

5. Gastrointestinal & Metabolic Problems

It might sound far-fetched, but diabetes can prevent you from scuba diving. Severely diabetic or obese (BMI above 30) individuals usually can’t scuba dive in the United States because it can be fatal if your blood sugar levels are off.

Also, gastrointestinal problems / conditions are an absolute NO for scuba diving. Any gastrointestinal condition that leads to acid reflux, vomiting, perforation, and diarrhea will immediately get you off the boat – and for good reason because even one of these outcomes is enough to drown you.

Ps…pregnancy also prevents you from scuba diving.

6. Cancer Problems

You should not attempt scuba diving while on chemotherapy because chemo and radiation therapy are exhausting and bring your stamina levels to zero. Ideally, wait until after you’re fully recovered from the effects of your therapy.

Since cancer isn’t an exact problem, the scuba restrictions are variable as well. People with brain, lung, or colon cancer MIGHT have to leave scuba diving forever. Comparatively, individuals with other cancer types only require a medical clearance certificate to dive, provided that they’re healthy and have enough stamina.

7. Other Miscellaneous Problems

Musculoskeletal problems such as amputated legs and scoliosis can prevent you from scuba diving because you need the ability to move around, especially in colder waters with such heavy gear. Other such issues include disc prolapse, aseptic necrosis, and severe back pain.

You also need to be otolaryngological healthy to scuba dive. Since inner ears are inflexible like solids, they’re susceptible to rupturing as you go deeper. It’s also why you shouldn’t take scuba dives until sometime after inner ear surgery.

What should you not do after scuba diving?

As long as we’re on the topic of preventing scuba mishaps, here are the things you should not do after scuba diving.

1. Don’t go mountain climbing, skydiving, or other such activities

You must know by now that change in altitude has varying yet astounding impacts. Mountain climbing in the first 24 hours of scuba diving can even result in decompression sickness.

The same goes for skydiving, zip-lining, and related activities. Stick to the ground for the first 24 hours and avoid changing the elevation further. Although, you can skydive (and mountain climb, etc.) prior to scuba diving.

Quick & Easy Guide to Preparing Food for a Multi-Day Hike

Hiking

2. Don’t consume alcohol

Avoid alcohol (or at least don’t drink heavily) during the first 24 hours. Avoid any activity that causes dehydration because it also leads to decompression sickness.

3. Avoid massages right after diving

You may want that relaxing massage after a tiresome day of scuba diving. Still, you should ideally avoid it for the first 24 hours. And if you can’t avoid it, just get the normal one – deep tissue massages should be avoided at all costs. Deep tissue massages can mask the symptoms of decompression sickness and lead to a misdiagnosis.

  • Categories

I got into extreme sports about 20 years ago and am a die-hard adrenaline junkie. Just like in business, I choose my outdoor adventures based on how much they scare me. My goal is to share the lessons I’ve learned over the past couple of decades braving the unknown to encourage you to do the same.

Disclaimer

All content cited is derived from their respective sources. If you believe we have used your copyrighted content without permission, send me an email at [email protected] and I’ll remove it immediately.

About Us

Elevated Adventurer is your go-to sherpa for all things adventure sports and outdoor exploration. Here you’ll learn everything you need to know about your favorite outdoor sports from rock climbing and scuba to skydiving and extreme sports.

Source https://divers-world.com/diving-without-certification/

Source https://elevatedadventurer.com/find-out-medical-conditions-that-might-stop-you-from-scuba-diving/

Source https://elevatedadventurer.com/find-out-medical-conditions-that-might-stop-you-from-scuba-diving/

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