No Widgets found in the Sidebar

## Why You Shouldn’t Fly a Plane After Scuba Diving

Scuba diving is a popular activity that can be enjoyable and rewarding. However, it is important to be aware of the potential risks associated with scuba diving, including the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). DCS can occur when a diver ascends too quickly to the surface, causing nitrogen bubbles to form in the bloodstream. These bubbles can block blood vessels and cause serious injury or even death.

One of the most dangerous things that a diver can do after scuba diving is to fly in an airplane. The change in air pressure during a flight can cause the nitrogen bubbles in the bloodstream to expand, which can lead to DCS. The risk of DCS is greatest in the first 24 hours after scuba diving, but it can still occur up to 48 hours after diving.

The symptoms of DCS can vary, but they can include:

Joint pain
Muscle pain
Fatigue
Nausea
Vomiting
Dizziness
Confusion
Seizures
Paralysis

In severe cases, DCS can be fatal.

For these reasons, it is important to avoid flying in an airplane after scuba diving. If you must fly after diving, you should wait at least 24 hours, and preferably 48 hours, to allow the nitrogen bubbles in your bloodstream to dissipate.

## Other Risks to Consider

In addition to DCS, there are other risks to consider when flying after scuba diving. These include:

Ear barotrauma: This can occur when the pressure in the ears does not equalize during ascent or descent. Symptoms can include ear pain, hearing loss, and dizziness.
Sinus barotrauma: This can occur when the pressure in the sinuses does not equalize during ascent or descent. Symptoms can include sinus pain, headache, and nasal congestion.
Dehydration: Flying can be dehydrating, so it is important to drink plenty of fluids before and during your flight. Dehydration can worsen the symptoms of DCS.
Fatigue: Flying can be tiring, so it is important to get plenty of rest before and after your flight. Fatigue can also worsen the symptoms of DCS.

## Conclusion

Flying after scuba diving can be dangerous, so it is important to avoid doing so if possible. If you must fly after diving, you should wait at least 24 hours, and preferably 48 hours, to allow the nitrogen bubbles in your bloodstream to dissipate. You should also be aware of the other risks associated with flying after scuba diving and take steps to minimize these risks.

Read Post  What kind of scuba diving tank was rob stewart using

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *