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## What is a Surge in Scuba Diving?

A surge is a sudden, powerful increase in the strength of a current. It can be caused by a variety of factors, including changes in wind direction, the tide, or the underwater topography. Surges can be dangerous for divers, as they can cause them to be swept away from their dive site and into deeper water.

### Types of Surges

There are two main types of surges:

Surface surges are caused by changes in wind direction. When the wind blows over the water, it creates waves. These waves can cause the water to move in a particular direction, creating a surge. Surface surges are typically strongest near the surface of the water.
Current surges are caused by changes in the tide or the underwater topography. When the tide changes, the water level rises and falls. This can cause the current to speed up or slow down, creating a surge. Current surges can occur at any depth, but they are typically strongest in areas with strong currents.

### Dangers of Surges

Surges can be dangerous for divers because they can cause them to be swept away from their dive site and into deeper water. This can be especially dangerous if the diver is not experienced or if they are not wearing a buoyancy compensator device (BCD).

In addition, surges can cause divers to lose their orientation. If a diver is swept away from their dive site, they may not be able to find their way back. This can lead to panic and disorientation, which can increase the risk of an accident.

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### How to Avoid Surges

There are a few things that divers can do to avoid surges:

Be aware of the weather forecast. If there is a chance of strong winds or high waves, it is best to avoid diving.
Check the tide tables. If the tide is changing, it is best to avoid diving in areas with strong currents.
Dive with a buddy. A buddy can help you to stay safe in the event of a surge.
Wear a BCD. A BCD can help you to stay afloat in the event of a surge.

### What to Do if You Encounter a Surge

If you encounter a surge, the most important thing to do is to remain calm. Do not panic and try to swim against the surge. Instead, try to ride out the surge by swimming with it.

Once the surge has passed, try to find your way back to your dive site. If you are unable to find your way back, surface and call for help.

### Conclusion

Surges can be dangerous for divers, but they can be avoided by following a few simple precautions. By being aware of the weather forecast, checking the tide tables, diving with a buddy, and wearing a BCD, you can help to reduce your risk of encountering a surge.

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