Uncertified divers

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pilot fish

Guest

Messages 11,538 Reaction score 3 Location Charlotte, NC, fomerly NYC all my life # of dives 200 – 499

Do divers that have many dives as uncertified divers, obviously no log kept either, make good, safe divers when they finally get certified? Is it a good thing to first start diving uncertified, or should you first start diving by the book with an instructor?

NadMat

DIMWIT Swamper 😉

I have known divers that were quite safe and had no formal certification. That didn’t mean they had no training. And I have known divers that had a wallet full of cert cards. It is not how many classes/certifications you have had, it is about what you have learned and how you apply it.

H2Andy

Contributor

Do divers that have many dives as uncertified divers, obviously no log kept either, make good, safe divers when they finally get certified?

i would imagine it depends on the diver. some will make good ones, some won’t.

however, the type of person who would dive without instruction is probably
going to be much less risk adverse than your average diver, so. they’ll
probably keep taking risks once certified

Is it a good thing to first start diving uncertified, or should you first start diving by the book with an instructor?

yeah. i’d say an instructor is a good thing . especially since you can
die if you get it wrong

you could learn how to defuse bombs on your own, but i think i’d rather
have an instructor.

don’t flame me, bro
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spectrum

Dive Bum Wannabe

Do divers that have many dives as uncertified divers, obviously no log kept either, make good, safe divers when they finally get certified? Is it a good thing to first start diving uncertified, or should you first start diving by the book with an instructor?

No it’s not a good thing.

Divers and instructors respectively are certified for a reason. Agencies have curriculums and requirements for a reason.

Sure you could study some and have a good mentor and become a fine capable safe diver.

You could also be unaware of a critical topic and your so called mentor could be your death sentence.

Get the correct training it’s affordable and will open all of the doors to the sport.

My ever growing collection of assorted ramblings on scuba topics can be read here.

No sequence of classes will make a good diver out of you, if you aren’t actively diving and practicing in the meantime.
TSandM

pilot fish

Guest

Messages 11,538 Reaction score 3 Location Charlotte, NC, fomerly NYC all my life # of dives 200 – 499

I have known divers that were quite safe and had no formal certification. That didn’t mean they had no training. And I have known diving idiots that had a wallet full of cert cards. It is not how many classes/certifications you have had, it is about what you have learned and how you apply it.

Generally speaking I agree with you, have seen some crummy divers with high cert, but I think they would get some bad habits that they might continue once certified.

The Chairman

Chairman of the Board

You mean like me.

I dunno. some think I am safe enough, I guess!

I am just glad that I am STILL alive and would recommend that anyone wanting to take up this sport to do it with an instructor. there is NOTHING down there worth dying for!

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Trinigordo

Contributor

I don’t know about you guys but I know a lot of people that were uncertified and very competent divers. And we all know people with C-Cards that should cut them in half and pick up something like croquet. So the answer lies in the fact that an idiot is an idiot even with his C-Card.

pilot fish

Guest

Messages 11,538 Reaction score 3 Location Charlotte, NC, fomerly NYC all my life # of dives 200 – 499

i would imagine it depends on the diver. some will make good ones, some won’t.

however, the type of person who would dive without instruction is probably
going to be much less risk adverse than your average diver, so. they’ll
probably keep taking risks once certified

yeah. i’d say an instructor is a good thing . especially since you can
die if you get it wrong

you could learn how to defuse bombs on your own, but i think i’d rather
have an instructor.

That last sentence is hysterical.

I agree with you. That is how I feel. I know of one guy in my office that had many dives as an uncertified diver that finally did get certified. He just got back from Hawaii with two other certified divers in my office that said that on a dive they all did together, he was horrible, sucked his tank down, improper weights etc. Must be something to this certification stuff

Uncertified Diver

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hypnodean

Registered

I am a newly certified Naui OW diver.

So, I am always looking for dive buddies in the Orlando area as I am new and have no friends that dive.

Today I got an e mail from a diver in a nearby town saying the were interested in buddying sometime, and that they had all their own equipment and that they were associated with a dive shop near Daytona.

The FURTHER went on to say that they were NOT certified.

Now, they claim years of experience but I find myself a bit leary and probably will decline buddying with them, unless there is a group or DM with him. BUT here is my question:

How do you suppose he gets air fills? Would a dive shop employ and offer scuba supplies to someone who had no certification? IS it common to come accross a “non certified” diver with lots of experience? Or is this all as “fishy” as it sounds to me.

Genesis

Contributor

There are a LOT of uncertified divers.

Certification is a relatively recent thing, and its not all THAT difficult to get fills. Gear can be bought online.

Many “old divers” got certified ONLY because it started to become too big of a hassle to keep diving without it. If you can avoid that hassle, why spend the money on what is, to you, a worthless card?

hypnodean

Registered

Ok. Thank you for that. I was concerned that this guy might be scamming somehow or doing something grossly unsafe. I appreciate the binocular perspective!

Contributor

There are a LOT of uncertified divers.
Many “old divers” got certified ONLY because it started to become too big of a hassle .

Yep, when I finally broke down & got a card my local dive shop owner was taking the same class.

Check the guy out though, he may still be scamming you.

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Genesis

Contributor

I’m somewhat in the same boat.

The OW class was worth it to me, the AOW, Nitrox and Rescue were not. Rescue didn’t teach me much that I didn’t already know, but its a “gateway” for any kind of technical card.

Why the tech card(s) in my future? No particular reason locally – I already do what people call “technical diving” off my own boat, and have my own fill station.

However, if I want to go somewhere and do such a dive, THEN I need a card to flash. Where the crossover point is for me where it becomes worth getting one is something I haven’t (yet) figured out – but it has driven essentially all of my “card acquisition” thus far.

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A friend of mine who spearfishes, and has been doing it for a long time, may not even have an OW card. He’s been diving since the Cousteau days though. I’ve never asked if he has one. Why would I care? He obviously can dive, and he outspears me and virtually everyone else on the boat – do you need more evidence of his ability than that?

smrtblnddiver

Guest

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and you’re the only bait in town.

Genesis

Contributor

Some of these guys have never bothered to log anything, but have more bubble time than the most prolific card-carrier or even instructor.

The guy I’m talking about probably has logged several man-YEARS underwater – or he would have if he bothered to keep a log!

Walter

Contributor

“Certification is a relatively recent thing”

True, it’s very recent compared to the Roman Empire, having only been around since 1954 (LA County) and nationally since 1959 (YMCA). Compared to the age of SCUBA, it is NOT recent at all. Gagnon’s regulator was invented 60 years ago, for 49 of those years certifications have been available in the US (44 years nationwide). So for 81% (or 73%) of the life of the demand regulator (and they weren’t available in the US in 1943, so the numbers are generous) certifications have been available.

The Devil’s in the details.

Disclaimer: All discussion of value, by me or anyone else, is opinion.

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ScubaJewel

Contributor

Does one need to attend Engineering school to be an engineer? Does a ditch digger need to attend ditch digging school to perform that job?

The answer to almost any job/career question like this is NO. Pay scales may differ and job opportunities may differ based upon education but I have heard that individules who take it upon themselves to learn something like this quite often end up being better than their “formally trained” counterparts.

The reason for this is that the have the drive to learn and they don’t receive the Biased slant often placed upon students of a certain instructor or school etc. They go the extra mile so to speak.

If you are worried about whether or not an “uncertified” diver has the “Book Learnin” part of the program then quiz them. As for how good of an “in water” diver they may be, Well I know people who passed every classroom exam with no errors who can’t actually perform underwater to save their soul.

Did you know that “specialty” dive training only came into popularity as a way of making more $ for dive businesses and instructors.

And by the way there is very few actual laws dictating proceedures when it comes to Scuba Diving. Purchasing dive gear, buying air, etc. can all be done by anyone certified or not. If a dive shop wants it can refuse to serve anyone. But most won’t.

Can you scuba dive with high blood pressure?

Can you scuba dive with high blood pressure? The answer is yes, but there are.

Can you scuba dive with high blood pressure? The answer is yes, but there are some things you need to know first.

If you have high blood pressure, also known as hypertension, you may be wondering if you can still enjoy the underwater world through scuba diving. The good news is that you can! However, there are a few things you need to take into consideration before taking the plunge.

Your blood pressure should be under control and at a stable level before going. You will also need to get a clearance from your doctor, as well as have your blood pressure checked by a certified dive instructor prior to diving.

checking blood pressure before going to scuba dive

When diving, it is important to monitor your blood pressure closely. If you start to feel lightheaded or dizzy, it is important to surface immediately and seek medical help.

With proper preparation and monitoring, diving with high blood pressure is perfectly safe and can be a great way to enjoy the underwater world!

Scuba Diving with High Blood Pressure

If your blood pressure is well controlled with medication, or if it’s not related to a serious medical condition, you may be able to dive safely. Some people with chronic high blood pressure may need to take precautions before diving.

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Diving can put additional stress on the body. When your body is under stress, hormones are released that can raise your blood pressure plus you are wearing a wetsuit and other equipment like Apeks VX1 Mask and Cressi Frog Plus Fins. This reaction is more pronounced when you’re underwater and breathing compressed air. If you’re taking medications for high blood pressure, they’re generally designed to counteract this effect.

two person doing scuba dive with high pressure inside water

High blood pressure can cause complications while diving, such as:

  • Tendency to develop gas bubbles in the bloodstream (decompression sickness)
  • Increased risk of bleeding from the ears, sinuses or lungs
  • Possible risk of stroke or heart attack

Severe Conditions

You have high blood pressure, but you want to go scuba diving. Is this a wise plan? This is a question that comes up often enough that it’s worth tackling here.

First of all, the risks of diving for the average person with high blood pressure are very low. If you’ve been following your doctor’s treatment plan and keeping your blood pressure under control, then there is no reason why you shouldn’t be able to dive safely.

However, if diving causes a significant increase in your blood pressure, then it may not be safe for you to dive. This is because bursts of high blood pressure can damage the walls of the arteries and heart. Such damage can lead to dangerous conditions such as aneurysms or heart attacks.

If you have high blood pressure but want to go scuba diving, then you should first discuss the matter with your doctor. If your doctor approves, then the next step is to get a medical clearance from a qualified diving physician who can perform tests to determine whether or not your blood pressure will rise significantly when you dive.

Blood Pressure and Scuba Diving

It is widely understood that increased pressure can cause a significant reduction in blood volume. The increase in pressure compresses the blood vessels, which consequently reduces blood flow. As a result, the heart must pump faster and harder to pump enough blood through the body. This is especially true for divers with pre-existing medical conditions. Diving places additional strain on the circulatory system and is not recommended for people with a history of cardiovascular disease or high blood pressure.

Pre-existing Medical Conditions:

Many factors can affect whether or not you should dive if you have high blood pressure. For instance, if you have an elevated diastolic pressure (the bottom number) it may be safer to dive than if your systolic pressure (the top number) is elevated. If your blood pressure has been well controlled with medication, and is close to normal, diving may be possible as long as you can complete a dive physical with a licensed physician. However, even if your blood pressure is close to normal, diving requires more exertion than most activities and can place additional stress on the heart. Therefore, it’s important to work closely with your physician when deciding whether or not diving is safe for you.

Conclusion

While scuba diving may not be recommended for everyone with high blood pressure, there are some cases where it is safe to dive with this condition. If you have well-controlled blood pressure and are generally healthy, your doctor may give you the green light to dive. In addition, if you take medication to control your blood pressure, your doctor will need to make sure that it is safe for you to dive while taking this medication. Also you need to learn scuba dive for this. It is also important to check with your diving insurance company to make sure that you are covered in case of any problems that may occur while diving.

If you have high blood pressure and want to try scuba diving, the best way to do so is to talk to your doctor and find a reputable dive center that can cater to your needs. With proper precautions and medical clearance, scuba diving can be a safe and enjoyable activity for people with high blood pressure.

Source https://scubaboard.com/community/threads/uncertified-divers.131949/

Source https://scubaboard.com/community/threads/uncertified-diver.43692/

Source https://scubapromax.com/guides/scuba-dive-with-high-pressure/

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