Good dry bags for diving

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Elmstreet_Hunt

Beginning of September I will fly with my family to Maui for eight days.
Of course I want to do some snorkeling and scuba diving (never did scuba diving before . that will be fun :vintagediver.

What dry bags (to store cellphone, car keys and wallet) do you guys recommend?
I found several products (aLoksak, AquaPack, Kwik Tek Dry Pack, . ) but it seems the only one certified for deeps up to 60m is aloksak. Just want to make sure that the stuff inside stays dry while I’m in the water.

charlesg3

Contributor

If you’re really trying to bring items to depth consider an otterbox or similar type item. I’m not sure why you’d want your wallet and cell phone at depth, if you don’t then a leaving them in a simple dry bag should work. Perhaps even a ziplock should mostly work, I’ve left mine in shorts pockets on boats.

DA Aquamaster

Directional Toast

You will want something that resists pressure if you are going to take a cell phone under water. with a soft “bag” it may stay dry but it will get squished by the pressure and that is not great for many phones.

I normally leave mine on the boat in a regular dry bag along with wallet etc. Just leave it in a dive bag or somewhere else not overly obvious and you won’t have a problem. It’s a boat, if someone steals it while you are under water, the list of suspects is short and they have no where to go so it does not take Adrian Monk to solve the case and even a stupid thief knows it.

Also, when you look at the probabilities involved, you are more at risk of losing the wallet and cell phone under water than on the boat.

If you still feel the need to take a cell phone under water, OMS sells a pressure cannister rated to 600 ft and that would be my first choice. Some divers, in places where there is current and where they are still in cell range of shore do that in order to be abel to call for help if they drift away from the boat.

Life is not measured by the number of breaths you take, but rather by the number of moments that take your breath away.

BonaireDan

Contributor

Messages 242 Reaction score 1 Location Ohio, retiring to Bonaire within 5 years # of dives I’m a Fish!

Dry box od some kind is your best bet. Many of the bag things to take on a dive are really best for snorkeling – no pressure issues. I have had a small dry box leak however so still be careful.

On Bonaire where we shore dive mostly we do not leave anything in the vehicle and leave it unlocked. So, no recourse but to take things with you. However other than vehicle keys I take nothing to the dive site I can’t lose or live without. On a boat is fine to leave things like you describe.

PADI IDC Staff Instructor, SDI & HSA OWSI, DAN Instructor
A Diver’s Toast
Here’s to Lying, Cheating and Stealing
If you have to lie – Lie to save a Friend
If you have to cheat – Cheat only Death
If you must steal – Steal more time off work to DIVE !

Was RoatanMan

Messages 10,475 Reaction score 3,431 Location Chicago & O’Hare heading thru TSA 5x per year # of dives None – Not Certified

Of course I want to do some snorkeling and scuba diving (never did scuba diving before

What dry bags (to store cellphone, car keys and wallet) do you guys recommend?

This might have been discussed once before.

When you begin to learn to dive, or as you snorkel. this time with a container of family treasures attached in some fashion to yourself, doing this will create a number of new situations for you to deal with.

You are essentially tying a positively buoyant object to yourself. In snorkeling, securing it to yourself may be a difficulty, in SCUBA, any instructor that works with you- their first instinct will be to remove it and toss it aside.

Here’s what we have already learned from that one other post on this very subject : Money, credit cards and driver’s licenses are waterproof. Your wallet itself, and pictures of the kids are not.

Car Keys, the non-electronic kind that will open the car door and cost $1 at the hardware store- they seem to resist salt water pretty well. Put the electronic $100 key hidden deep inside the vehicle.

Cell Phones are best left back inside the car. All sorts of experts on rescue will chime in as to their usefulness for rescue as you are lost at sea and the sharks are circling. But if you want to consider that after dive #50, well then, by all means, but until then, hide it under something in the trunk.

Until then, you are thinking about a “dry bag”, which you have been wisely steered away from. I say this only to ask you to consider your perspective. Your experience level caused you to consider this sport with what amounts to a minimum of a 1/4 cubic foot of air strapped to your butt.

As you progress, you will quickly understand that trying to snorkel or dive with an empty 1 gallon milk jug strapped on just wont work. You will quickly realize a lot of things. You will slowly realize some other things.

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An otter box may work for your “needs”. But you might be looking for a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist.

Remember: Keys, ID and Cash are waterproof. Cell Phones are not. One may well be useful, the other most likely not.

Doc Adelman PADI way before there was numbers

SeaDrops Latinum Mask Defog: Refined from glistening beads of perspiration gently blotted from the downy naked inner thighs of our private stable of free-range virgin Swedish Divemistresses

Why use SCUBA bags?

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Lowrider Steve

Registered

I would really like to know some opinions on SCUBA bags. I bought my gear several years ago and the shop sold a soft sided gear bag for my wife and I. On our OW trip to Hawaii, the airline completly destroyed her bag. In order to complete the trip, we went to WalMart on Kauai and bought a $40 suitcase that has wheels. It works better than my SCUBA bag as it has wheels, is a firm sided so offers more protection, and does not advertize to the world that it contains expensive and easy to sell gear.

I am about to go out and get a big suitcase for me. I just would like to know if there are compelling reasons to spend several hundred dollars for a specially designed bag.

A fine is a tax for doing bad. A tax is a fine for doing good.

danktex

Contributor

When I travel I try as hard as possible not to advertise that I have expensive Scuba gear in my bag. I see no benefit in “scuba bags”. They might hold up better with wet gear but I always dry mine before I leave. I am usually pushing my weight limits. The last thing I need to do is pay extra to bring water back with me.

I just would like to know if there are compelling reasons to spend several hundred dollars for a specially designed bag.

I can’t imagine a reason to dish out several hundred $’s for a bag, however if you dive from a charter boat you may want a bag (a normal bag).

Doesn’t have to be “specially designed” but big enough to fit all the gear you’ll be using on the dives of the day.

I haven’t purchase one in a long while but they shouldn’t be much more than 50~75$. I like them to have a more than half mesh, not only to let the gear breath but to be able to see what’s inside.

Lowrider Steve

Registered

A fine is a tax for doing bad. A tax is a fine for doing good.

ronbeau

Contributor

I would really like to know some opinions on SCUBA bags. I bought my gear several years ago and the shop sold a soft sided gear bag for my wife and I. On our OW trip to Hawaii, the airline completely destroyed her bag. In order to complete the trip, we went to WalMart on Kauai and bought a $40 suitcase that has wheels. It works better than my SCUBA bag as it has wheels, is a firm sided so offers more protection, and does not advertise to the world that it contains expensive and easy to sell gear.

I am about to go out and get a big suitcase for me. I just would like to know if there are compelling reasons to spend several hundred dollars for a specially designed bag.

None of my luggage has any Scuba logos on it with the with the exception of the Akona mesh backpack which only get used on the dive boat.

We have two pieces of Stahlsac rolling soft-side luggage and two pieces rolling hard-side luggage we owned prior to taking up diving.

Bratface

Contributor

Any sturdy bag will do. I spray Scotchguard on the inside and the outside of my dive bag to help repel water. So far none of my bags (3) have rotted.

HenrikBP

Contributor

One thing to keep in mind is that certain features of the bag needs to be strong enough to handle the heavy gear. I bought what looked like a good rolling duffel bag, but unfortunately the wheels, or really the axles, aren’t up to the task. Just something to keep in mind when you go shopping.

Trust is good . Control is better.

“She trusts me with her life, but not with her donuts . “

“DNY isn’t what you’d call a “warm and fuzzy” kind of love.” Mike Parz

Damselfish

ScubaBoard Supporter

I’ve never used “scuba” branded luggage. I use a soft sided bag, but it’s a good soft sided bag. Rolling duffel with rigid bottom and pull out handle. We used to have some inexpensive rolling duffles, they worked ok too, but they had less structure and the handle did not pull out so they were much more awkward to roll around.

My husband uses a generic hard sided rollaboard for camera gear, but other than that hard sided luggage hasn’t worked as well for us. When loaded with gear and kicked around tends to break instead of bend. We had some Samsonite stuff with a lifetime warrenty that they were always fixing or replacing – broken wheels, bashed corners, cracks, you name it. And damp gear made the inside icky.

Kamchatka

Contributor

(Edited) I bought a soft sided gear bag. The airline destroyed it. I bought a $40 wheeled suitcase. It works better than my SCUBA bag as it has wheels and is firm sided and does not advertize that it contains expensive gear. Are there compelling reasons to spend several hundred dollars for a bag.

IMHO, no. I too am a strong proponent of hardsided luggage but got an Oceanic Voyager 3 duffel ($110 delivered, now $150) from LP 15 months ago. It’s been on eight airline-challenged dive trips. Still like new. Well thought out and designed. Many useful pockets and compartments. The nylon material seems pretty tough. Wheeled, beaucoup carrying straps, and pull-out towing handle with a zippered cover for when the handle is stowed. 11.15# empty. 30″ X 15″ X15″. Plenty of Oceanic logos. They disappeared in ten minutes with a black indelible marker thus helping it blend in with its surroundings. The handle is long enough to make pulling it comfortable and the widely spaced wheels make for stability. All in all I give it a 92; good lyrics and easy to dance to. YMMV (BTW, the former Rodale’s was what prompted me to buy it over some others. Some folks in these here parts aren’t real big Rodale’s ratings fans.)

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Best Dry Bags and Sacks

Best Dry Bags and Sacks

Dry bags are the best choice for a traveler seeking an adventure in the water. They make for fantastic scuba gear bags and will keep all of your best diving accessories safe.

They are lightweight, waterproof and many have a roll-top so you have more flexibility with the size. It has everything that you want for outdoor activities in unpredictable weather conditions.

Table of Contents

Top 10 Best Dry Bags

Planning on traveling with dive gear soon? Check out our dive packing guide for top tips on how to best pack your scuba diving essentials and belongings. Before start, you can learn how a dry bag works here.

But first, you need to find a dry bag that works for you. Here are our top 10.

1. Cressi Waterproof Dry Bag Camo

Cressi Waterproof Dry Gear Bag

Every scuba diver is familiar with Cressi. It is one of the most trusted brands for water sports because of its Italian design and high-quality materials.

This Cressi dry bag is made with a cool camo material that is soft to the touch yet still strong and waterproof. It has a side-release buckle and two straps; one to carry in your hand and one for over your shoulder.

The roll-top is perfect for traveling. You can compress it further if you are only carrying a few things or make space for gear whenever necessary.

Best Features:

  • 100% waterproof
  • Roll top with quick-release buckle
  • Available in 10L & 20L

2. Sea to Summit Ultra-SIL Dry Sack

Sea to Summit Ultra-SIL Dry Sack

The signature ultra-SIL Cordura nylon material is unlike the material that you see on other dry bags. It is lighter, both in weight and thickness, which also makes it more flexible.

This is a great choice for longer trips at sea, for example during a scuba diving liveaboard trip. The design comes in many different sizes so you can place several waterproof dry bags in a bigger dry bag.

As the name suggests, this dry bag works whether you are in the water or on top of a mountain. They won the Backpacker Editor’s Choice Award for a reason.

Best Features:

  • Thinner flexible material
  • Big size range
  • Siliconized exterior

3. SEAC U-Boot 100 Diving Dry Bag

SEAC U-Boot 100 Dry Bag for Diving

Wet scuba diving gear makes finding the right bag hard – until now! SEAC has created the perfect water sport bag that is suitable for both wet and dry items.

The design looks similar to a regular sports bag but has the added advantage of a drainage cap. This means you can simply drop in all your gear, open the cap and let the water drain out. It could not be easier.

This is a very large dry bag so you will be able to fit in most of the scuba diving gear that you need on your trip. With a little careful packing, you might even be able to use it as your only check-in baggage for the trip.

Best Features:

  • Draining cap
  • Tarpaulin with reinforced sleeves
  • Extra-large 100L capacity

4. IDRYBAG Waterproof Backpack

IDRYBAG Waterproof Dry Bag Dry Sack

Don’t feel comfortable carrying the weight on a single strap? Then switch your dive gear bag to this backpack-inspired design by IDRYBAG.

With this purchase, you basically get two bags for the price of one since you can fold the straps away so that it becomes the simple roll-top dry bag that is more common. This versatility lets you use your IDRYBAG in any season, at sea or in the mountains.

Dry bag backpacks are great alternatives to the sack-like options. They are a little more versatile and will take away some of the pressure on your shoulders and prevent back pain.

Best Features:

  • Converts into a backpack
  • Large size
  • Includes smaller companion bag

5. Earth Pak Dry Bag with Waterproof Phone Case

Earth Pak Waterproof Dry Bag

Whether it is on a kayak or boating, you can spot an Earth Pak dry bag during almost any water sport. This popular brand is known for not being afraid of color, versatile design, and affordability.

This specific model has one extra perk; it comes with an IPX8 waterproof phone case. Earth Pak was already one of the top contenders and with the addition of this pouch, they are staying strong against their competition.

As usual, this Earthpak dry bag is available both in a small and large size. Get different volumes and different colors so you can use the smaller ones as pouches for better organization.

Best Features:

  • Includes waterproof phone case
  • Many sizes available
  • Easy to spot colors

6. Piscifun Floating Dry Bag + Phone Case

Piscifun Waterproof Dry Bag Backpack

For certain items that you need quick access to, opening and closing your dry bag is not ideal. If this is one of your pet peeves then you will love the strong outer mesh pocket on this Piscifun dry bag.

In addition to the exterior mesh pouch, your mobile will stay safe in the IPX8 pouch. The pouch is waterproof but thin enough that you can still type through it.

Another reason why this is a top pick is that it floats. As a kayaker (or on other boats) you no longer have to worry about your essentials sinking to the bottom of the sea.

Best Features:

  • Floating dry bag
  • Exterior mesh pocket
  • Includes IPX8 waterproof phone case

7. Kastking Military Grade Dry Bags

KastKing Waterproof Storage Dry Bags

Offering some of the best water protection, Kastking is an unbeatably strong adventure bag. Made with a double layer of 500D PVC material, this is a fabric that you will struggle to tear.

Another plus point, the see-through panel lets you see what is inside your bag at any time. No matter the season, no matter the activity, with this big you are ready for an adventure.

Best Features:

  • Military-grade
  • Clear panel
  • Also snowproof, sand proof, and dustproof

8. Marchway Waterproof Roll Top Bags

MARCHWAY Floating Waterproof Dry Bag

These Marchway dry bags are perfect for a traveler that loves the sea. Compact and waterproof, it is a great pick for when you are spending the day on a dive boat.

If it ever does go overboard, you can easily spot it floating in the sea thanks to its bright colors. Regardless of the weight of its contents, it will float as long as the top is rolled and closed.

This dry bag is not only perfect out on the ocean but also does its job in the desert and snowcapped mountains. You can even wear it on your back riding a bike through the mud and you still won’t find anything penetrating through the bag.

Best Features:

  • Floating dry bag
  • Safe from mud, snow, and sand
  • Extra tight closure

9. FE Active Eco-Friendly Waterproof Backpack

FE Active Dry Bag Waterproof Backpack

This FE Active waterproof backpack should be on the wish list of every outdoor enthusiast. It is perfect for any activity at seas such as scuba diving or kayaking but also does its duty for camping.

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It features 2 padded shoulder straps and padded back support designed for better airflow. Inside you will find a pouch to keep your more valuable items separate and outside there is a mesh pouch for quick access to a flask.

The bag itself is very lightweight – at just 2 pounds the bag itself won’t weigh you down. To win points with your buddies; throw in some ice packs and use it as a cooler bag.

Best Features:

  • Suitable for any outdoor activity
  • Great weight
  • Foldable & compact with lots of storage

10. Vitchelo 30L Waterproof Dry Bag Backpack

Vitchelo 30L Waterproof Dry Bag Backpack

No more carrying multiple bags on the dive boat. Keep everything you need for a day of scuba diving in this 30L bag by Vitchelo.

It includes a waterproof phone pouch that is compatible with a touch screen so you always have your phone handy. It also features two mesh pouches on the sides and a string web at the front for any extra you want to bring with you.

These are the types of bags that you carry with you anywhere. It is comfortable, versatile, and safe for electronics.

Best Features:

  • Padded double straps
  • Includes waterproof pouch
  • Mesh pouches

For a quick recap, here are our Top 3 Products:

OUR #1 PICK Cressi Waterproof Dry Bag Camo

  • 100% Waterproof
  • Quick-Release Buckle
  • Trusted Brand
  • 2 Different Colors

FOR BEGINNERS Sea to Summit Ultra-SIL Dry Sack

  • Flexible Material
  • Siliconized Exterior
  • Nearly Transparent
  • 660+ Amazon Reviews

FOR PROFESSIONALS Vitchelo 30L Waterproof Dry Bag Backpack

  • Padded Double Straps
  • Mesh Pouches
  • Versatile Design
  • 30L Capacity

Frequently Asked Questions about Dry Bags

Best Dry Bag

There are many different designs for dry bags so choose the one that is best for your needs. Get a small dry bag for the valuable essentials like your mobile, wallet, and underwater camera and a bigger dry bag backpack for bulkier scuba gear.

What do you consider the must-have features in a dry bag? Which out of our top 10 dry bags is your favorite? Let us know in the comments. To help you a little further in your search for the best dry bag, we’ve answered some of the most popular FAQs below.

What is a dry bag used for?

A dry bag is a waterproof bag used for packing the essentials of outdoor activities. These bags are designed to be lightweight, compact, and waterproof so that the contents are always kept safe. It is perfect for scuba diving, kayaking, and camping.

What is the best dry bag?

The best waterproof dry bag is made of strong materials, is comfortable to carry, and folds away easily. Some of the most versatile and top quality dry bags are made by these brands:

  • Cressi
  • Earth Pak
  • FE Active
  • Sea to Summit

When shopping for a dry sack or bag, think about what you will be using it for. Make sure that it won’t be a nuisance to carry and that all the items that you will need can fit inside.

It is better to buy a bag that is a little too big than one that is a little too small. This is especially true for the roll top versions since those are easily folded down to save some space.

Are dry bags waterproof?

As the name suggests, dry bags are waterproof. They are often made with reinforced seals and non-porous materials that prevent water from coming in.

However, even the best dry bags let in water if you don’t close them properly. Don’t overstuff the dry bag and follow the instructions on how to seal the bag completely.

One important distinction that needs to be made is between dry bags and a dry sack. Although these terms are often used interchangeably, they are technically not the same.

A dry sack is only water-resistant, not waterproof. They are often made of thinner materials that are more lightweight and easier to fold.

A dry sack is often placed inside dry bags to act as a separate compartment. This keeps your travel bag organized and acts as an extra barrier when you are keeping both wet and dry gear in your bag.

How do I make a dry bag?

You can make your own DIY dry bag if you can find the right materials and know-how to sow. We do not recommend making your own dry bags if you not a good sewer because you risk it not being 100% waterproof.

Getting the seams right requires precision. Whether the bag is truly waterproof depends on how well you seal the seams.

You will need the following materials:

  • Waterproof fabric like Cordura
  • Webbing (for straps)
  • Polyester thread
  • Seam sealer
  • Side release buckle
  • Stiff plastic
  • Scissors
  • Lighter

10 Steps to Make Your Own Dry Bag

Step 1:

Find a sewing pattern for a dry bag and cut the appropriately sized pieces accordingly. Alternatively, you can use your own preferred dimensions but make sure there are extra inches on all sides for the seams and top closure.

Step 2:

Sew together the main piece which will become the body of the bag. Hint: sew everything inside out so you can see the seams.

Step 3:

Sew the base circle and the main body pieces together. Remember that it is inside out.

Step 4:

Seal the seams by melting them gently with the lighter or using the seam sealer. Make sure there aren’t any holes where the water could come through.

Step 5:

Take the piece of stiff plastic and place it at the top of the bag to measure for fit. Then cut a strip that is 1 inch in height. The strip only needs to be long enough for half of the circumference.

Step 6:

Place the strip of plastic inside the bag, 1 inch below the edge. Fold in the top of the bag so that it completely covers the plastic strip. Mark the line and then sew it closed.

Step 7:

Sew together the side-release buckle and webbing to make the straps.

Step 8:

On the side opposite the plastic strip, make 2 cuts into the fold and pull the straps through.

With this DIY dry bag, you can create a waterproof seal by pressing together the top and folding the side with the plastic strip over the side with the buckle and straps. Fold over a few more times and close the buckle for the best seal.

Scuba diving is more than a passion to me, it’s a part of who I am. Now, I travel and dive as much as I can, exploring the world, trying new dive gear, discovering dive destinations and reviewing them here for you. All while educating people of the threats our marine life and oceans face every day and what we can do to help defend it.

Source https://scubaboard.com/community/threads/good-dry-bags-for-diving.298011/

Source https://scubaboard.com/community/threads/why-use-scuba-bags.218606/

Source https://oceanscubadive.com/best-dry-bags-and-sacks/#:~:text=Dry%20bags%20are%20the%20best%20choice%20for%20a,so%20you%20have%20more%20flexibility%20with%20the%20size.

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