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## Can You Open Your Eyes Scuba Diving After Laser Eye?

Laser eye surgery has become increasingly popular in recent years as a way to correct vision problems such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism. Many people who have had laser eye surgery report that they can now see clearly without glasses or contact lenses. However, there is some debate about whether or not it is safe to open your eyes while scuba diving after laser eye surgery.

There are two main concerns about opening your eyes while scuba diving after laser eye surgery. The first concern is that the water pressure could damage the delicate tissues of your eyes. The second concern is that the chlorine in the water could irritate your eyes and cause discomfort.

Water pressure

The water pressure at a depth of 33 feet is about twice the air pressure at sea level. This means that the water is pushing on your eyes with a force of about 15 pounds per square inch. This force can be enough to damage the delicate tissues of your eyes, especially if you have had recent laser eye surgery.

Chlorine

The chlorine in swimming pools and hot tubs can irritate your eyes, especially if you have had recent laser eye surgery. Chlorine can cause your eyes to become red, itchy, and watery. In some cases, chlorine can even cause corneal abrasions.

Can you open your eyes scuba diving after laser eye surgery?

The answer to this question is not entirely clear. Some doctors recommend that you wait at least 6 months after laser eye surgery before opening your eyes while scuba diving. Other doctors believe that it is safe to open your eyes while scuba diving after laser eye surgery, as long as you take certain precautions.

Precautions

If you decide to open your eyes while scuba diving after laser eye surgery, it is important to take the following precautions:

Wear a protective mask. A protective mask will help to protect your eyes from the water pressure and chlorine.
Limit your diving depth. Do not dive to a depth of more than 33 feet.
Avoid diving for long periods of time. Take breaks every 30 minutes or so to give your eyes a rest.
Rinse your eyes with fresh water after diving. This will help to remove any chlorine from your eyes.

Conclusion

If you are considering scuba diving after laser eye surgery, it is important to talk to your doctor first. Your doctor will be able to give you more information about the risks and benefits of scuba diving after laser eye surgery and help you decide if it is right for you.

## Additional information

In addition to the precautions listed above, there are a few other things you can do to reduce the risk of eye damage while scuba diving after laser eye surgery.

Choose a dive site with clear water. This will help to reduce the amount of chlorine in the water.
Avoid diving in rough seas. Rough seas can increase the water pressure on your eyes.
Use artificial tears. Artificial tears can help to keep your eyes moist and protected.
See your doctor regularly. Your doctor can check your eyes for any signs of damage and make sure that your vision is still good.

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