Table of Contents

The 20 Best Whitewater Rafting Day Trips

Last year I wrote about the World’s 13 Legendary River Trips, a list of the best expedition style, multi-day river trips. That post was the catalyst for some great discussions about the most legendary single day rafting trips.

What makes a trip legendary?

The gold standard for a legendary rafting trip is one that is frequently inquired about, remembered, and rehashed around the campfire. The most important factor is great whitewater, but I also considered scenery, length of season, and reputation.

I’ve attempted to order these from most difficult to least difficult and had to make a few judgment calls that I’m sure will spark some controversy. Cherry Creek and the South Fork of the American River have different styles of whitewater, but they both have great rapids (harder doesn’t necessarily mean better), and I consider both of them legendary.

1. Upper Tuolumne River (Cherry Creek), California

Coffin Rapid on Cherry Creek

Coffin Rapid on Cherry Creek

Cherry Creek is the gold standard for Class V and is the hardest section of commercially rafted whitewater in the United States. Rapids like Mushroom (V), Toadstool (V), and Lewis’s Leap (V) challenge even the most experienced river guides. The first few times down, you’ll probably be scared (as you should be), but once you see the beautiful lines through back-to-back, huge rapids you’ll want to keep coming back for more. Learn more about rafting Cherry Creek.

2. Zambezi River (Bakota Gorge), Zimbabwe and Zambia

Bakota gorge on the Zambezi River

Bakota gorge on the Zambezi River | Photo by Sam Swanson

The legendary day section of the Zambezi River forms the border with Zimbabwe and Zambia. It starts just below the famous Victoria Falls, and has 25 big water Class IV and V rapids in a deep gorge that can be rafted most of the year. Learn more about the Zambezi River.

3. Futaleufu River (Bridge to Bridge), Chile

Rafting Casa de Piedra (V) on the Futaleufu River

Rafting Casa de Piedra (V) on the Futaleufu River | Photo courtesy of Earth River Expeditions

The “Fu” is known for its big water rapids, stunning turquoise color, and incredibly beautiful river canyon. The bridge to bridge (puenta a puente) section is like doing all the biggest rapids of the Grand Canyon back-to-back in just 5 miles. You can go past the take-out bridge to add Mas-o-Menos (V-) and Casa de Piedra (V). Learn more about rafting trips on the Futaleufu River.

4. Bhote Kosi (Upper), Nepal

Rafting on the Bhote Kosi in Nepal

Rafting on the Bhote Kosi in Nepal

The Bhote Kosi is one of few day trips in Nepal and it’s a humdinger! It’s a 12 mile trip with big rapids like Frog in the Blender (IV+), Great Wall (V), Gerbil in the Plumbing (IV+), and Liquid Bliss (IV).

5. Cal Salmon River (Nordheimer), California

Airplane Turn on the Cal Salmon River

Airplane Turn on the Cal Salmon River | Photo courtesy of Momentum River Expeditions

The Cal Salmon is a stunningly beautiful river that flows between two wilderness areas in the coast range of Northern California. The Nordheimer section has three big Class V rapids surrounded by a ton of classic Class IVs. There is also great whitewater downstream on the Butler section and the nearby Ikes section of the Klamath River. Learn more about rafting the Cal Salmon with Momentum River Expeditions.

6. Youghiogheny River (Upper), Pennsylvania

Rafting Tommy

Rafting Tommy’s Hole on the Upper Yough | Photo courtesy of Wilderness Voyaguers

Famously known as the Upper Yough (pronounced “Yock”), this steep river requires very precise maneuvers through tight boulder-choked rapids. Most people take smaller boats like AIRE Super Pumas with 3-4 paddlers per boat in order to negotiate the unique style of rapids. Learn more about rafting the Upper Yough from Wilderness Voyageurs.

7. Gauley River (Upper), West Virginia

Pillow Rock on the Upper Gauley River

Pillow Rock on the Upper Gauley River

The Upper Gauley is an absolute classic and one of the most popular and renowned rafting trips in the world. Pillow Rock (V), Lost Paddle (V), and Sweet’s Falls (V) are three of the hardest and most interesting and thrilling rapids in the world. The nearby Lower Gauley and New Rivers are equally amazing (and easier) rivers, making this a world-class paddling destination. Learn more about rafting the Upper Gauley.

8. Wairoa River, New Zealand

The Wairoa has 35 technical rapids including The Waterfall (V) and Rollercoaster (V) in just 2 hours. The river flows through a tree-lined gorge and is dam controlled with just 26 days of water each year.

9. Chattooga (Section IV), South Carolina and Georgia

Sock

Sock’em Dog Rapid on Section IV of the Chattooga River | Photo courtesy of Wildwater

In 1974 the Chattooga was the first river east of the Mississippi to be granted the powerful Wild and Scenic river designation. Section IV is the last seven miles of the river and has the steepest, most exciting whitewater commercially rafted in the Southeast. In a 1/4 mile gorge, the river drops more than 75 feet through the famed Five Falls: Entrance (IV), Corkscrew (V), Crack-In-the-Rock (IV), Jawbone (V), and Sock’em Dog (IV). Learn more about rafting Section IV from Wildwater.

10. Lochsa River, Idaho

Lochsa Falls on the Lochsa River

Lochsa Falls on the Lochsa River | Photo by Eric Evans Photography

The Lochsa is famous for its 30 big rapids in 30 miles. It has a huge boatable range, anywhere from 1500 cfs to over 22,000! Every year boaters from around the West meet up to paddle there during peak flow for “Memorial Day Madness.” The Lochsa is in a remote part of Idaho with no cell phone coverage making it a great place to come for a few days of great paddling and camaraderie.

11. Arkansas River (Royal Gorge), Colorado

The Royal Gorge is over a thousand feet deep, contains spectacular scenery, history, geology, and has some of the most fast-paced whitewater in Colorado. The first rapid Sunshine Falls (IV) is extremely technical at low water and angry at high water. The Big Horn Sheep Canyon above the Royal Gorge (also known as Parkdale) turns running the Gorge into an awesome full day trip. If you are brave enough to put in at Pinnacle Rock during high water you can run the notorious Three Rocks (IV/V), fun wave trains of the Big Horn Sheep Canyon, and the Royal Gorge. When the water is medium or high levels, even the most seasoned guides will take notice. Learn more about the Royal Gorge from Echo Canyon River Expeditions.

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12. Klamath River (Upper), Oregon

Caldera Rapid on the Upper Klamath River

Caldera Rapid on the Upper Klamath River | Photo courtesy of Indigo Creek Outfitters

If you love whitewater, you’ll LOVE the Upper Klamath. It begins with Caldera (IV+), a rapid so epic it has a brewery named just for it. After Caldera, you’ll find powerful and continuous Class IV and IV+ monsters just keep coming at you. Learn more about rafting the Upper Klamath.

13. Penobscot River, Maine

The Penobscot is a technical river flowing through a beautiful granite walled canyon. The big rapids in the upper section are Exterminator (V) and The Staircase (V). One of the highlights is the wildlife and if you’re lucky you’ll even see a moose! Learn more about rafting the Penobscot from New England Outdoor Center.

14. Pacuare River (Lower), Costa Rica

The Pacuare is a full day of paddling Class III and IV rapids through a beautiful Costa Rican rainforest. The highlight is a beautiful waterfall dropping into the river between Upper Huacas (IV) and Lower Huacas (IV).

15. Paro Chhu, Bhutan

Rafting below a 600 year old bridge on Bhutan

Rafting below a 600 year old bridge on Bhutan’s Paro Chhu

This is the least known river on the list since very few people are able to visit Bhutan due to their “High Value and Low Volume” tourist policy. However, for those that have rafted it, this river is legendary due to its beautiful Class IV rapids, crystal-clear water, and a memorable side hike up to an active monastery. Learn more about rafting trips in Bhutan.

16. Ottawa River, Canada

The Main Ottawa flows through channels and big drops separated by the Rocher Fendu Islands. The water is warm and has big water rapids like Bus Eater (IV) and the White Faced Monster (IV). The “middle” section downstream is known for Garvin’s Chute (IV), a 15 foot waterfall.

17. Wenatchee River, Washington

Rafting on the Wenatchee River

Rafting on the Wenatchee River | Photo courtesy of Wildwater River Guides

The Wenatchee is a big water Class III river with large waves and low consequences in Northern Washington. One of the highlights are views of the nearby Enchantments, a beautiful mountain range with jagged peaks.

18. Neretva River, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Rafting on the Neretva River

Rafting on the Neretva River

The Neretva is a crystal-clear Class III river flowing through a stunning, vertically walled canyon with many amazing waterfalls cascading into the river. It is simply breathtaking and easily Bosnia’s best rafting trip in a country full of amazing rafting trips. The Neretva is fairly close to Sarajevo and is a must-do when visiting the region. Learn more about rafting in Bosnia and Herzegovina.

19. South Fork of the American River, California

Rafting the South Fork of the American River

Rafting the South Fork of the American River | Photo courtesy of H2O Adventures

The Coloma Valley and South Fork of the American are the beating heart of the California whitewater community. The South Fork has fun rapids like Troublemaker (III+), Satan’s Cesspool (III+), and Hospital Bar (III-) that have big hits and beautiful lines that anyone will enjoy. The nearby Middle Fork and North Fork of the American are also legendary rafting trips that could (and some may say should!) also be on this list. Learn more about rafting on the South Fork of the American River.

20. Deschutes River, Oregon

Wapinita Rapid on the Deschutes River

Wapinita Rapid on the Deschutes River | Photo courtesy of River Drifters

The Deschutes River is one of Oregon’s longest and best known rivers. The day section near Maupin is the most popular rafting trip in the state because of its friendly rapids and reliably consistent water. There are great multi-day trips upstream and downstream of the day section as well. Learn more about rafting the Deschutes River.

Honorable Mention

There are a few more legendary rafting trips that should have also made this list, but were left off for brevity.

Washington's White Salmon River

Washington’s White Salmon River is one of the best half day trips in the world

Merced River, California; Lower Kern River, California; North Fork of the Umpqua River, Oregon; White Salmon River, Washington; New River (Lower), West Virginia; Colorado River (Gore Canyon), Colorado; Arkansas River (Brown’s Canyon), Colorado; Kaituna River, New Zealand; South Fork of the Payette River, Idaho; Ocoee River, Tennessee; Cheoah River, North Carolina;Misahualli River, Ecuador; Kennebec River, Maine; Sanna River, Austria; Kicking Horse River, British Columbia; Tully River, Australia

Putting this list together was a fun project and I did my best to make the most comprehensive list possible. If you think I missed any rivers please let me know in the comments below!

The Longest Rivers In The World

Rivers are defined as natural flowing freshwater bodies that move from a high elevation to a lower elevation, finally draining into oceans, lakes, seas, or other rivers. It is challenging to precisely determine the world’s longest river from so many long rivers located throughout the different continents of the planet. Although most of us believe that the Nile River is the longest, some scholars have claimed that the Amazon River is the longest of all rivers. In 2009, a peer-reviewed article published in the “International Journal of Digital Earth” cleared the confusion and declared the Nile River – the longest river in the world. The following article discusses the ten longest rivers in the world.

1. Nile River – 6,650km

Aerial view of the sunset over the River Nile in Cairo, Egypt

Aerial view of the sunset over the River Nile in Cairo, Egypt.

Also known as the “Father of the African Rivers,” the 6,650km long River Nile is considered the world’s longest river as well as the longest river in the continent of Africa. The Nile River is formed by the combination of its two principal tributaries: the White Nile and the Blue Nile. The two tributaries of the river Nile meet at Khartoum – the capital city of Sudan. From Khartoum, the first portion of the river Nile flows for approximately 1,380km to Lake Nasser, while the second portion flows for about 80km over a series of five cataracts before reaching the final cataract. The Nile River finally enters a delta region in North Cairo and splits into two distinct distributaries, eventually emptying into the Mediterranean Sea. The Nile drainage basin is about 3,349,000 sq. km which includes portions of 11 African Nations such as Burundi, DR Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Republic of Sudan, South Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda.

2. Amazon River – 6,400km

The Amazon River in Brazil.

The Amazon River in Brazil.

The 6,400km long Amazon River, which drains about 40% of the continent of South America, is considered the world’s second-longest river and the largest in South America. It is also the world’s largest river in terms of discharge volume, having an average discharge of about 209,103 cubic meters per second. A peer-reviewed publication in 2014 revealed that the headwaters of the Mantaro River, which rises in Peru’s Cordillera Rumi Cruz, be considered the origin of the Amazon River. The waters of the Mantaro River then join the waters of the Apurimac River, which is further joined by various other tributaries downstream to form the Ucayali River. The Ucayali River then merges with the Maranon River to form the Amazon River’s main stem. The Amazon River finally drains into the Atlantic Ocean, close to the Brazilian city of Belem. The Amazon River Basin covers about 7,050,000 sq. km, and its entire watershed spans the South American nations of Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Guyana, and Venezuela.

3. Yangtze River – 6,300km

Qutang Gorge and Yangtze River in Baidicheng, Chongqing, China

Qutang Gorge and Yangtze River in Baidicheng, Chongqing, China.

The 6,300km long Yangtze River, which drains about one-fifth of China’s land area, is considered the world’s third longest river and the longest river in the People’s Republic of China and the continent of Asia. The mighty Yangtze River originates at Jari Hill, located at an elevation of 5,710m in the Tanggula Mountains. Considered the world’s longest river that flows entirely within the boundaries of a single country, over 700 tributaries join the Yangtze River throughout its entire course. Finally, it drains into the East China Sea close to the city of Shanghai. The Yangtze River Basin covers about 1,808,500 sq. km and is the world’s seventh-largest river in terms of discharge volume, with an average discharge volume of 30,166 cubic meters per second. The Yangtze River flows through the eleven Chinese provinces, namely Anhui, Chongqing, Hunan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Qinghai, Sichuan, Shanghai, Tibet, and Yunnan.

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4. Mississippi/Missouri River – 6,275km

Aerial view of Mississippi River snaking around farmlands in Louisiana

Aerial view of Mississippi River snaking around farmlands in Louisiana.

The Mississippi-Missouri-Jefferson River system is considered the fourth-longest river in the world. The Mississippi River, which is North America’s second-longest river, measures 3,770km from its origin in Lake Itasca to the Gulf of Mexico’s Mississippi River Delta. North America’s longest river – the Missouri River, measures 3,767km from its source in the Rocky Mountains to its confluence with the lower Mississippi River. The Mississippi-Missouri-Jefferson River System drains 32 US States and 2 Canadian provinces.

5. Yenisey-Angara-Selenga River – 5,539km

The Yenisei River flows through a picturesque valley

The Yenisei River flows through a picturesque valley.

The Yenisey-Angara-Selenga River system is considered the world’s fifth-longest river and the largest that empties into the Arctic Ocean. The 992km long Selenga River is the headwater of the Yenisey-Angara River system and empties into Lake Baikal. The headwater tributary of Yenisey River – the Angara River, originates from Lake Baikal close to the urban settlement of Listvyanka and then flows northwards through the cities of Russia’s Irkutsk Oblast before merging with the Yenisey River close to Strelka. The Yenisey River originates in Mongolia’s Mungaragiyn-gol and flows northward through a large portion of Siberia before draining via the Yenisei Gulf into the Kara Sea of the Arctic Ocean.

6. Yellow River – 5,464km

Lanzhou city on the other side of the Yellow River, Gansu Province, China

Lanzhou city on the other side of the Yellow River, Gansu Province, China.

Also referred to as Huang He, the 5,464km long Yellow River is the world’s sixth-longest river and China’s second-longest river. The Yellow River originates from the Bayan Har Mountains close to the eastern tip of the Qinghai province’s Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture. It then flows across the vast North China Plain before emptying into the Gulf of Bohai. The Yellow River Basin drains an area of 752,546 sq. km flowing through seven Chinese provinces and two autonomous regions. The Yellow River has an average discharge volume of 2,571 cubic meters per second.

7. Ob-Irtysh River – 5,410km

The Novosibirsk Hydroelectric power plant is a hydroelectric power station on the Ob river in the Soviet district of the city of Novosibirsk

The Novosibirsk Hydroelectric power plant is a hydroelectric power station on the Ob river in the Soviet district of the city of Novosibirsk.

The Ob-Irtysh River system is considered the world’s seventh-longest river. The Ob River rises at the meeting point of the Biya and Katun rivers in the Altai Mountains. At about 69° East longitude, the Orb River is joined by the large Irtysh River. The river ultimately drains via the Gulf of Ob into the Kara Sea of the Arctic Ocean. The combined Ob-Irtysh River system drains an area of 2,990,000 sq. km.

8. Rio de La Plata-Parana-Rio Grande River – 4,880km

View of the skyline of Buenos Aires, Argentina from Rio de la Plata

View of the skyline of Buenos Aires, Argentina, from Rio de la Plata.

The Rio de La Plata-Parana-Rio Grande River system is considered the world’s eighth-longest river. The Parana River originates at the meeting point of the Rio Grande and Paranaiba rivers in the southern part of Brazil. The river then joins the Paraguay River and the Uruguay River and forms the Rio de la Plata River, which finally drains into the Atlantic Ocean. The Rio de La Plata-Parana-Rio Grande River system drains an area of 2,582,672 sq. km.

9. Congo-Chambeshi River System – 4,700km

A small village in green hills at Congo River, Democratic Republic of Congo, Africa

A small village in green hills at Congo River, Democratic Republic of Congo, Africa.

The Congo-Chambeshi River system is considered the world’s ninth-longest river. The Congo River is Africa’s second-longest river and the world’s second-largest river in terms of discharge volume. The Chambeshi River, which is the Congo River’s most remote headstream, originates high in the mountains at an elevation of 1,760m, close to Lake Tanganyika. The river then flows into the Bangweulu Swamps, from which it flows out as the Luapula River. The Chambeshi River is actually a tributary of the 1,800km long Lualaba River, which is the Congo River’s biggest headstream by water volume. The Congo Basin drains an area of 4,000,000 sq. km accounting for about 13% of the entire landmass of the African continent and covers portions of nine African nations, including Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central Africa Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia.

10. Amur-Argun-Kherlen River System – 4,444km

Sunset on the embankment of the Amur River in Khabarovsk, Russia

Sunset on the embankment of the Amur River in Khabarovsk, Russia. Editorial credit: Dmitrii Rud / Shutterstock.com

The Amur-Argun-Kherlen River system is considered the world’s tenth longest river. Also referred to as Heilong Jiang, the 2,824 km long Amur River originates at the meeting point of the Argun and Shilka Rivers in the western portion of Northeast China. The river forms a boundary between Southeast Siberia and Northeastern China. The Amur River drains an area of 1,855,000 sq. km and has an average discharge volume of 11,400 cubic meters per second. Together with the Amur River, the 1,620km long Argun River forms a portion of the eastern boundary between China and Russia. Originating on the southern slopes of the Khentii Mountains, the 1,254km long Kherlen River flows in the eastern direction, eventually draining into Hulun Lake, the waters of which finally meet the Argun River.

The above article discusses the ten longest rivers in the world. Out of these ten long rivers, two long rivers are from Africa, two from South America, one from North America, and five from Asia. As seen in the above discussion, a majority of the world’s major cities are located along the shores of a river and use the waters of the river as a source of drinking water, hydroelectric power generation, navigation, and for various recreational activities.

The Longest Rivers In The World

Rivers are defined as natural flowing freshwater bodies that move from a high elevation to a lower elevation, finally draining into oceans, lakes, seas, or other rivers. It is challenging to precisely determine the world’s longest river from so many long rivers located throughout the different continents of the planet. Although most of us believe that the Nile River is the longest, some scholars have claimed that the Amazon River is the longest of all rivers. In 2009, a peer-reviewed article published in the “International Journal of Digital Earth” cleared the confusion and declared the Nile River – the longest river in the world. The following article discusses the ten longest rivers in the world.

1. Nile River – 6,650km

Aerial view of the sunset over the River Nile in Cairo, Egypt

Aerial view of the sunset over the River Nile in Cairo, Egypt.

Also known as the “Father of the African Rivers,” the 6,650km long River Nile is considered the world’s longest river as well as the longest river in the continent of Africa. The Nile River is formed by the combination of its two principal tributaries: the White Nile and the Blue Nile. The two tributaries of the river Nile meet at Khartoum – the capital city of Sudan. From Khartoum, the first portion of the river Nile flows for approximately 1,380km to Lake Nasser, while the second portion flows for about 80km over a series of five cataracts before reaching the final cataract. The Nile River finally enters a delta region in North Cairo and splits into two distinct distributaries, eventually emptying into the Mediterranean Sea. The Nile drainage basin is about 3,349,000 sq. km which includes portions of 11 African Nations such as Burundi, DR Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Republic of Sudan, South Sudan, Tanzania, and Uganda.

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2. Amazon River – 6,400km

The Amazon River in Brazil.

The Amazon River in Brazil.

The 6,400km long Amazon River, which drains about 40% of the continent of South America, is considered the world’s second-longest river and the largest in South America. It is also the world’s largest river in terms of discharge volume, having an average discharge of about 209,103 cubic meters per second. A peer-reviewed publication in 2014 revealed that the headwaters of the Mantaro River, which rises in Peru’s Cordillera Rumi Cruz, be considered the origin of the Amazon River. The waters of the Mantaro River then join the waters of the Apurimac River, which is further joined by various other tributaries downstream to form the Ucayali River. The Ucayali River then merges with the Maranon River to form the Amazon River’s main stem. The Amazon River finally drains into the Atlantic Ocean, close to the Brazilian city of Belem. The Amazon River Basin covers about 7,050,000 sq. km, and its entire watershed spans the South American nations of Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Guyana, and Venezuela.

3. Yangtze River – 6,300km

Qutang Gorge and Yangtze River in Baidicheng, Chongqing, China

Qutang Gorge and Yangtze River in Baidicheng, Chongqing, China.

The 6,300km long Yangtze River, which drains about one-fifth of China’s land area, is considered the world’s third longest river and the longest river in the People’s Republic of China and the continent of Asia. The mighty Yangtze River originates at Jari Hill, located at an elevation of 5,710m in the Tanggula Mountains. Considered the world’s longest river that flows entirely within the boundaries of a single country, over 700 tributaries join the Yangtze River throughout its entire course. Finally, it drains into the East China Sea close to the city of Shanghai. The Yangtze River Basin covers about 1,808,500 sq. km and is the world’s seventh-largest river in terms of discharge volume, with an average discharge volume of 30,166 cubic meters per second. The Yangtze River flows through the eleven Chinese provinces, namely Anhui, Chongqing, Hunan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, Qinghai, Sichuan, Shanghai, Tibet, and Yunnan.

4. Mississippi/Missouri River – 6,275km

Aerial view of Mississippi River snaking around farmlands in Louisiana

Aerial view of Mississippi River snaking around farmlands in Louisiana.

The Mississippi-Missouri-Jefferson River system is considered the fourth-longest river in the world. The Mississippi River, which is North America’s second-longest river, measures 3,770km from its origin in Lake Itasca to the Gulf of Mexico’s Mississippi River Delta. North America’s longest river – the Missouri River, measures 3,767km from its source in the Rocky Mountains to its confluence with the lower Mississippi River. The Mississippi-Missouri-Jefferson River System drains 32 US States and 2 Canadian provinces.

5. Yenisey-Angara-Selenga River – 5,539km

The Yenisei River flows through a picturesque valley

The Yenisei River flows through a picturesque valley.

The Yenisey-Angara-Selenga River system is considered the world’s fifth-longest river and the largest that empties into the Arctic Ocean. The 992km long Selenga River is the headwater of the Yenisey-Angara River system and empties into Lake Baikal. The headwater tributary of Yenisey River – the Angara River, originates from Lake Baikal close to the urban settlement of Listvyanka and then flows northwards through the cities of Russia’s Irkutsk Oblast before merging with the Yenisey River close to Strelka. The Yenisey River originates in Mongolia’s Mungaragiyn-gol and flows northward through a large portion of Siberia before draining via the Yenisei Gulf into the Kara Sea of the Arctic Ocean.

6. Yellow River – 5,464km

Lanzhou city on the other side of the Yellow River, Gansu Province, China

Lanzhou city on the other side of the Yellow River, Gansu Province, China.

Also referred to as Huang He, the 5,464km long Yellow River is the world’s sixth-longest river and China’s second-longest river. The Yellow River originates from the Bayan Har Mountains close to the eastern tip of the Qinghai province’s Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture. It then flows across the vast North China Plain before emptying into the Gulf of Bohai. The Yellow River Basin drains an area of 752,546 sq. km flowing through seven Chinese provinces and two autonomous regions. The Yellow River has an average discharge volume of 2,571 cubic meters per second.

7. Ob-Irtysh River – 5,410km

The Novosibirsk Hydroelectric power plant is a hydroelectric power station on the Ob river in the Soviet district of the city of Novosibirsk

The Novosibirsk Hydroelectric power plant is a hydroelectric power station on the Ob river in the Soviet district of the city of Novosibirsk.

The Ob-Irtysh River system is considered the world’s seventh-longest river. The Ob River rises at the meeting point of the Biya and Katun rivers in the Altai Mountains. At about 69° East longitude, the Orb River is joined by the large Irtysh River. The river ultimately drains via the Gulf of Ob into the Kara Sea of the Arctic Ocean. The combined Ob-Irtysh River system drains an area of 2,990,000 sq. km.

8. Rio de La Plata-Parana-Rio Grande River – 4,880km

View of the skyline of Buenos Aires, Argentina from Rio de la Plata

View of the skyline of Buenos Aires, Argentina, from Rio de la Plata.

The Rio de La Plata-Parana-Rio Grande River system is considered the world’s eighth-longest river. The Parana River originates at the meeting point of the Rio Grande and Paranaiba rivers in the southern part of Brazil. The river then joins the Paraguay River and the Uruguay River and forms the Rio de la Plata River, which finally drains into the Atlantic Ocean. The Rio de La Plata-Parana-Rio Grande River system drains an area of 2,582,672 sq. km.

9. Congo-Chambeshi River System – 4,700km

A small village in green hills at Congo River, Democratic Republic of Congo, Africa

A small village in green hills at Congo River, Democratic Republic of Congo, Africa.

The Congo-Chambeshi River system is considered the world’s ninth-longest river. The Congo River is Africa’s second-longest river and the world’s second-largest river in terms of discharge volume. The Chambeshi River, which is the Congo River’s most remote headstream, originates high in the mountains at an elevation of 1,760m, close to Lake Tanganyika. The river then flows into the Bangweulu Swamps, from which it flows out as the Luapula River. The Chambeshi River is actually a tributary of the 1,800km long Lualaba River, which is the Congo River’s biggest headstream by water volume. The Congo Basin drains an area of 4,000,000 sq. km accounting for about 13% of the entire landmass of the African continent and covers portions of nine African nations, including Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central Africa Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Zambia.

10. Amur-Argun-Kherlen River System – 4,444km

Sunset on the embankment of the Amur River in Khabarovsk, Russia

Sunset on the embankment of the Amur River in Khabarovsk, Russia. Editorial credit: Dmitrii Rud / Shutterstock.com

The Amur-Argun-Kherlen River system is considered the world’s tenth longest river. Also referred to as Heilong Jiang, the 2,824 km long Amur River originates at the meeting point of the Argun and Shilka Rivers in the western portion of Northeast China. The river forms a boundary between Southeast Siberia and Northeastern China. The Amur River drains an area of 1,855,000 sq. km and has an average discharge volume of 11,400 cubic meters per second. Together with the Amur River, the 1,620km long Argun River forms a portion of the eastern boundary between China and Russia. Originating on the southern slopes of the Khentii Mountains, the 1,254km long Kherlen River flows in the eastern direction, eventually draining into Hulun Lake, the waters of which finally meet the Argun River.

The above article discusses the ten longest rivers in the world. Out of these ten long rivers, two long rivers are from Africa, two from South America, one from North America, and five from Asia. As seen in the above discussion, a majority of the world’s major cities are located along the shores of a river and use the waters of the river as a source of drinking water, hydroelectric power generation, navigation, and for various recreational activities.

Source https://www.nwrafting.com/articles/20-legendary-whitewater-rafting-trips

Source https://www.worldatlas.com/rivers/the-longest-rivers-in-the-world.html

Source https://www.worldatlas.com/rivers/the-longest-rivers-in-the-world.html

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