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16 Reasons Washington State Is The Worst

16 Reasons Washington State Is The Worst

Washington State is just the worst. Don’t let people fool you when they say “it’s beautiful” or “there’s so much to do” because they are wrong. Don’t believe me? Here are 16 reasons why Washington is just terrible.

1. There’s nothing to do.

You can Google “Things to do in Washington” all you want, but you won’t find anything worth your time.

2. And there’s nothing to see.

Mountains? Boring. Waterfronts? Overrated. There’s nothing special about Washington.

3. The people have no spirit.

What a bunch of bandwagon fans!

4. It rains all the time.

It literally rains every single day.

5. No seriously, it’s always gross out.

It is constantly pouring down rain.

6. Nothing good has ever come out of Washington.

Microsoft? Lame. Boeing? Don’t care. Starbucks? Who even drinks coffee.

7. The food is just terrible.

This is disgusting.

8. Like, there’s just no variety.

There’s no way this place would ever be successful.

9. The people are completely uninteresting.

10. And it’s so crowded.

Don’t get me started on the traffic.

11. Seriously, don’t move here.

12. Like adventure? There’s none of that in Washington.

Adventure is not out there, don’t go looking for it.

13. It lacks cultural history.

It’s not like most of the cities have Native American names or anything like that.

14. The music scene is practically nonexistent.

Smells like I’m not impressed. Who would even listen to these guys?

15. Honestly, Washington is just not exciting whatsoever.

I’m sick of all this incredible landscape.

16. Not impressed.

Seriously, don’t even bother visiting. You’ll probably be disappointed.

This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.

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Why My Dad is My Dad

He is more than what people call him.

Why My Dad is My Dad

Now growing up, I never really understood how lucky I was until I went to college. When I was younger, I had some sort of resentment towards my dad, because by blood he wasn’t my “father.” I would toss around attitude because that’s just what society drilled in my head. This man wasn’t meant to be my dad.

As I got older, I began loving my dad more because I started to see how incredible of a man he is. My dad always talked to me about God, but in high school that wasn’t really my thing. I was more concerned with tennis, my friends, and boys. My dad kept pressing into me. Talking about Jesus with me at the most random times. One thing was certain, I was grateful because at this point my family was going through difficult times and he exemplified what a man is.

Transferring to Texas State was the highlight of me and my dad’s relationship. I heard all these stories about my peers’ dads. When they would ask me about my dad, they would say “Oh you mean he’s your step dad, what about your real dad.” This really hit a nerve with me. I usually would just tell them that he is MY dad.

Why did it start hitting a nerve, now in my early 20s? Well because I grew up. I would think of my life being my mom’s age when she had me. I couldn’t even handle having a kid. My dad met my mom when I was about 9 months, and I don’t think having a kid was the plan. I don’t think I could ever just put my life on hold for love, but my dad did. He eventually made the best of it. With an angry teenager, he still managed to bring Jesus into my life.

Another thing happened at Texas State, I found Jesus. The man my dad kept telling me about, finally made His way into my heart. I honestly don’t think I could’ve found my Heavenly Father without the help of the father God has placed in my life. There is a reason for everything. My dad is my spiritual leader. Without him, I don’t think I would be so secure with my faith. I can tell my dad to pray for me because I’m emotionally tired and he doesn’t try to pry into my life. He would just tell me he would pray. And in that moment I feel better.

This article this week isn’t about how many shares I can get, it’s about my DAD. My one and only dad that, without a doubt, is always there for me.

Thanks Daddy for loving Christ and loving me.

Thanksgiving Travel Tips

A few ways to make your trip home more enjoyable!

Thanksgiving Travel Tips

With Thanksgiving around the corner, I decided to offer a few tips for travelling home! If you’re like me, then you’ve been desperately counting down the days until it’s time to go home. While some of you may be carpooling home, others may be taking a bus or train. Because I live in San Diego, I have to take a very long trip on the Amtrak consisting of taking both the train and the bus. Regardless of how you’re getting home, it’s good to be prepared for the trip home. With that said, I hope you all benefit from this article.

#1 Pack light!

This is probably the issue I struggle with most when I plan on going home! On the Amtrak, there really isn’t much space available for you to put your luggage. During holiday peak times like Thanksgiving, it’s especially hard to find space. For this reason, I recommend to bring no more than two pieces of luggage with you. I usually bring my backpack and either a large duffel bag or my small suitcase. For some people, that is not enough to hold all their necessities. If this is the case, I recommend that you get to the Amtrak station 2 hours early to check in your luggage. With Amtrak, I believe you can check in two pieces of luggage and you can carry an additional two as carry-on bags. I personally don’t like being at the train station, so I just pack light.

#2 Bring snacks!

If your trip is especially long, then I recommend buying some snacks for your trip! I usually bring two water bottles, a bag of chips, and fruit snacks/gummies. Other snack suggestions include: cookies, trail mix, and granola bars. If you’re driving home, then I definitely recommend snacking on the road to keep you awake.

#3 Bring a blanket/pillow

If you’re in for a long ride on a car, bus, or train, then be sure to bring a blanket and pillow! My train ride is about three hours and I usually don’t fall asleep, but for the second half of my trip, I am on the bus for 5 hours. I usually try and get some sleep on the bus since the lights are off and it’s generally pretty quiet. I often forget my blanket, which is unfortunate since the bus is usually very cold for some reason. If a blanket and pillow seem like a bit much, it also helps to bring a comfy hoodie and a travel neck pillow.

#4 Entertainment

Be sure to bring something to keep you occupied during your trip home. I usually use my phone and laptop the most when I travel home. Listening to music or watching a movie is a good way to pass the time until you get home. I sometimes bring a book or even my knitting when I travel!

#5 Remember to stay charged!

Don’t forget the necessary chargers for your electronics! Always make sure you have your phone chargers, laptop chargers, and whatever else you may need to make sure your electronics don’t die! If you’re travelling on the Amtrak, be sure to take advantage of the outlets on the train and the bus. The outlets on the train are along the wall, and most Amtrak busses have outlets in between underneath the seats. A lot of people don’t know about the outlets on the bus, so be sure to keep a look out for those as well.

I hope my tips helped those of you who are preparing for the journey home! Be sure to travel safe, and I wish all of you a happy Thanksgiving!

FALLing Into Nostalgia

Its always a special time.

FALLing Into Nostalgia

Living in Washington, D.C. is an amazing experience and the city offers so many opportunities that enhance my college experience everyday. Living in the same city as our president and living blocks away from our national monuments is inspiring, and being surrounded by ambitious and intelligent students, professors, and politicians motivates me to be the best version of myself, but still in mid October, I feel as though something is missing from this city.

It’s hard to be homesick in a city as busy and distracting as Washington D.C., but when I realize I still walk to class in shorts and flip flops and when I wake up to dreary, rainy days, I realize how some of the seasonal changes of fall don’t exist in this city and I start to miss the beautiful falls that I experience at home in Fairfield, Connecticut.

I had lived in Fairfield, Connecticut my whole life and it is much further north than D.C. Living in a rural and forest-filled town has spoiled me with the most beautiful and fullest falls that D.C. has deprived me of. I was lucky enough to also have a house in Easton, Connecticut, which was only a town over form Fairfield, but it entailed about a twenty-minute drive. When my mom moved there, I wasn’t ready to accept the changes, but as fall came around, I started to really appreciate the twenty minutes I had to myself in my car driving through the beautiful roads of Easton.

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I drove from Fairfield to Easton almost everyday and as I learned the back roads of Easton more familiarly, I started to purposefully drive off-route on my way home from cheerleading practice and silently admire the beautiful fall foliage, cherishing every minute I had to myself in that car. I would roll down my windows a little bit to catch that pleasant fall night smell that was so specific.

Every morning, I would wake up and step outside in my fall boots and light coat, catching the drift of crisp fall air and get into my car to drive to Fairfield again. As each fall morning passed, I was able to watch the leaves gradually change colors and start to cover more and more of the winding roads.

This beautiful drive passed through many farms and local markets that offered fall activities like apple picking, pumpkin picking, and corn mazes. Fall wasn’t fall unless you did at least one of those things and no apple-picking trip was fulfilled without warm apple cider or a pumpkin donut. Although most people only experience the apple or pumpkin picking experience once a season, I was lucky enough to drive by the beautiful apple orchards every day. Some days before school I would even smell the cider donuts and other fall baked goods baking, tempting me to stop in and pick up breakfast before school.

In Fairfield, fall also meant cheerleading practice, Friday night football games, pep rallies, rival high school soccer games, and a lot of school spirit, and without any of that at GW, I start to miss all of what fall entailed and I become a little bit nostalgic. As much as I have fallen in love with D.C., fall just isn’t the same here without the nature, trees, orchards, and school spirit. The closest thing I’ve experienced that relates to fall is buying a pumpkin spice latte from Starbucks, but that just isn’t the same as a fresh pumpkin donut or warm apple cider. As November approaches, and I still have yet to notice any seasonal changes and have yet to participate in a fall activity, I really miss my hometown in general at this beautiful time of the year and would do anything to drive that route from Fairfield to Easton that captured all of the best parts of fall so magically

6 Safety Tips for the Solomon Islands You Must Know

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For the latest travel warnings and alerts around the world, read about lockdowns and border restrictions.

Find out about tropical cyclones, earthquakes, crime in Honiara, safety tips for local transport and local etiquette and customs tips to know before you go.

A tropical beach in the Solomon Islands

Photo © Getty Images/grace conlan

The Solomon Islands are made up of six major islands and more than 900 smaller islands, which are spread out to the east of Papua New Guinea and north of Australia. Travelers come here for the relaxing beach resorts, but most are drawn by the coral atolls, mountain peaks and crystal clear water with unbelievably good scuba diving and snorkeling.

The main island is Guadalcanal, the scene of fierce fighting in WWII, and where the capital city of Honiara is found. Honiara isn’t the safest place to be, so skip the capital for one of the outlying islands for a trouble free trip.

Crime in Honiara

The Solomons is a melting pot of various ethnicities, and not all of these cultural groups get along. When one cultural group is unhappy, they like to show their frustrations via protests, which often turn into riots, which then sparks looting and general lawlessness.

Avoid all protests and public gatherings. Keep an eye on local media reports (or ask hotel staff) about potential conflict. Trouble brews quickly here.

Honiara is also the crime capital of The Solomons, and wealthy-looking visitors are often a target. Leave the expensive watches and expensive jewelry at home.

Don’t walk around the streets alone at night (best to go with a group or a guide), and give the early morning jog a miss.

If you do go out to a bar at night, be aware there’ll always be a few locals who like to fight – there were active headhunters on these islands until the 1930s, so they probably know how to handle themselves.

During the day pick pocketing, bag snatching, mobile phone theft and general harassment is common.

Hot-spots for crime in Honiara

These are the most common areas that experience crime in the capital: the Central Market, Point Cruz, the area surrounding old Mataniko bridge in Central Honiara (Chinatown), the Kukum area, Burns Creek/Lungga River in east Honiara, White River in west Honiara, Borderline and Kombito Market in the south-east of Honiar, and squatter settlement areas in and around Honiara.

Plus the Japanese War Memorial at Mt Austin where criminal gangs will operate in broad daylight.

The incidence of crime typically increases during the Christmas period, in the lead-up to major holidays and following periods of political instability.

If you are planning to travel outside Honiara to rural Guadalcanal, Malaita and other provinces, you should contact the High Commission for an update on the security situation prior to travel.

Yachties beware

Foreign governments also warn their yacht-based citizens to take care in Honiara harbour where there have been reports of criminals boarding yachts at night and stealing valuables. They are usually armed and are not deterred if confronted. It’s best to let them take what they want and live to tell the tale.

Local etiquette

Unnecessary friction is easily avoided if visitors take the time to acquaint themselves with local etiquette:

  • Land ownership in the Solomons is a sensitive issue. Trekking through seeming wilderness or using beaches close to Honiara may require payment of a ‘kastom’ fee to local landowners
  • Dress codes are modest and all tourists, especially women, are advised to avoid offence by respecting local custom
  • Certain taboo sites may only be visited by men
  • Swearing is a crime. It can lead to compensation claims or jail, or both
  • Homosexual acts (by either sex) are illegal and penalties include jail sentences.

Wildlife and natural disasters

Bull, Hammerhead and Tiger sharks are present throughout Solomon Islands coastal waters. The timid Reef Shark is harmless, but, unless you know the difference, be wary of all sharks.

About 50 people are killed every year by saltwater crocodiles. These are locals, well-acquainted with the ever-present danger. Unsuspecting tourists are well advised to seek advice before entering unfamiliar waters and to be wary in any case.

In and around Honiara, uncontrolled dogs roam freely, often in packs. Tourists are advised to be cautious.

Earthquakes

Solomon Islands is part of the Pacific ‘Ring of Fire’, an area of volcanic activity over 40,000 kilometres long where 90% of the world’s earthquakes occur. Four active volcanoes are listed. In April 2007, a magnitude 8.0 earthquake and tsunami struck the Solomon Islands killing at least 20 people and destroying villages. Another earthquake occurred in the Western Province on 4 January 2010. The resultant tsunami caused significant structural damage on the islands of Tetepare and Rendova. No lives were lost.

In 2013 a 8.0 magnitude earthquake struck the islands at a depth of 24km, which is considered very shallow. The resulting tsunami killed nine people.

Cyclones

The tropical cyclone season runs from November to May. Cyclones bring heavy rain and cause local flooding. Roads are damaged nd bridges often washed away. Travellers are advised to check local weather forecasts before traveling in unfamiliar areas.

Getting around safely

You should consider taking precautions when travelling by sea, such as providing your own life-jackets, as safety regulations are not always strictly applied.

Overcrowding of passenger ferries is common and can increase the safety risk.

There are few roads in the Solomon Islands, 90% of these are on Guadalcanal and Malaita. Many are very heavily potholed and in some areas bridges have collapsed.

Standards of driving and vehicle maintenance are poor. Be especially careful when overtaking any vehicle.

Many Solomon Islanders chew betel nut and frequently open vehicle doors, including on the driver’s side, when travelling at speed, in order to spit onto the road.

Get a travel insurance quote for Solomon Islands

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You can buy at home or while traveling, and claim online from anywhere in the world. With 150+ adventure activities covered and 24/7 emergency assistance.

12 Comments

Are their any foods that are dangerous to eat? Is the water safe to drink? Going in November to Kia village to help build a library. Any advice on what to not eat or drink?

Will they be hosting any Giant sightings in the inner Islands. and will we be able to explore any cave systems there, I heard if you get at least 15 men, 3 will make it out unscathed.

Unfortunately thats a 20% survival rate assuming you go in.

need to establish a contact with a local Honia3ra based Freelance Tour Guide to assist with organising a tour in Honiara with me. Can contact me +675 71817175, Lucas from Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea.

I,d like to read some of the paper from Solomon because it’s different from America.

Interesting article but a bit misleading. The author states there are “often” riots which spark looting and general lawlessness. Of course, this has happened in the history of Honiara . but “often” implies a frequency that is not accurate.

The author also states that visitors are “often” targets of crime – again, implying a level of frequency that is not true.

He states that general harassment is “common” – that has not been my experience. And that criminal “gangs” operate in broad daylight – again, not my experience.

In terms of wildlife – I dive regularly here and have never seen a bull or tiger shark. We occasionally see hammerheads (when we are super lucky) but there has never been a recorded attack. There are crocodile deaths in the villages every year but not in the numbers the author has stated.

Overall – all of the concerns he has listed are true, but wildly overstated. In fact – I would be as concerned about each of these issues in my hometown of Vancouver (except it would be bears instead of croc’s!)

I have lived here for 6 weeks in Honiara and I’m here for 12 months as a volunteer. I concur with what Shannon Kozak said. Remember the Solomons is a developing country so take that into account. Perception is reality and 2 people in the same place at the same time may well see things around them very differently. A lot of people travel in a cultural bubble. I’ve seen cruise ships in Honiara that dock for 12 hours and tourists would have some sort of experience of Honiara but I don’t think you could say that they have been to Honiara per se, they passed through more like it.

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So in my experience the people are friendly, Honiara is a busy city. The roads do have lots of potholes but the Japanese Govt through their International Aid program is kindly doing something about it with major upgrades currently occurring (December 2017) which have been ongoing and will be for some time. If you can travel out to the provinces then please do so. The Western Province is particularly beautiful with many, almost deserted islands. I’m going for Christmas to the Western Province and I’m really looking forward to it because the area is so undeveloped without all the luxury, expensive resorts so many other parts of the world have. You can fly from Honiara to Munda in the Western Province for about $220US and it takes about an hour. It’s a days trip by ferry and I’ve heard it is quite cramped and quite an experience by ferry so if I’m brave I might do that trip on the way back! It’s about $40US by ferry. Hope that helps!

How can I find free lance guide to go around the islands?

Shannon Kozak = CANADIAN . who posted her argument against the article author above.

Canada’s own Federal Government recently stated that Canadians have a poor track record for safety while engaging in international travel. lol. i.e. they take unnecessary and foolish risks.

Most recently, two Canadian tourists (young male & girlfriend) decided that they feared nothing and headed straight into the African CONGO. one of the most murderous places on earth right now. AND, its also the flash point for the largest Ebola epidemic which is still growing. Those two went missing and have NOT been found. They are dead. That was about 6 months ago and its currently June 2019.

As for her post above, note that she didn’t say how long she had been in the Soloman’s. Time is key. If she was there for a short period, then she had less of a chance to encounter crime, sharks, crocs.

She rejected the author by stating that: “visitors are “often” targets of crime – again, implying a level of frequency that is not true. visitors are “often” targets of crime – again, implying a level of frequency that is not true.” HOW DOES SHE DECIDE THAT?? BY STATISTICS? OR BY HER MERE LUCK OF AVOIDING CRIME?

She stated that, criminal “gangs” operate in broad daylight – again, not my experience.”
NOTE that she admitted “not in HER experience.” But the authors opinion is as valid as her own. She just dismisses his observations and claims her own as the better truth. lol.

Similarly, she based her following two statements on HER experience which is no more valid than the authors observations but she is naive enough to think HER experience carries more weight in truth.
1) general harassment is “common” – that has not been MY experience.
2) And that criminal “gangs” operate in broad daylight – again, not MY experience.

She states broadly, again, ” In terms of wildlife – I dive regularly here and have never seen a bull or tiger shark.” NOTE SHE has never seen a bull or tiger shark. So she wants YOU to risk your safety because SHE never saw a shark. How stupid to suggest her meager experience is the safety margin you need in avoiding shark attacks. She didn’t even identify what type of diving she did. SCUBA or free style snorkel? Yes, that makes a difference in what you see.

She concludes: “Overall – all of the concerns he has listed are true, but wildly overstated.” Says she.

There you have it. Everyone on planet earth knows that caution is the name of the game. Except that Canadian and other Canadians like her who get themselves into trouble by the thousands every year according to HER OWN GOVERNMENT. Don’t buy into her lame attack on the author. Be cautious.

All you have to do is to google crime in the Solomans to view many warnings on safety. I’m not sure why she even attempted to post what she did. It was silly.

It’s all about Caution when one travels. This was an enlightening read. I rarely ever research on customs before travelling

I lived in the Solomon islands as a 10 year old kid with my mother and stepfather, we where there for 3 months and I went back by myself when I was 11 and was there for 6 weeks we stayed on a tiny coral atol village that where ex head hunters we swam in croc and shark waters and had people who had never seen a white blond boy like me before.. They are the most happy, beautiful, a amazing, sharing, caring amazing peoples I have ever met in my 48 years.. Some of the comments here are so much BS and obviously come from city tourists that woud be scared even staying where I grew up in the mountains behind Byron bay . go.. You will never regret it and as long as you follow Kustoms and don’t break Taboo you will be treated with the utmost respect, be safer then in any western city and be taken in as one of there own.

I lived in the Solomon Islands about 20 years ago, doing volunteer work. It’s glorious and I’ve been thinking about those times often. I get a sense that the islands are stuck in time. We (a group of Australians and Canadians) lived in a village where we did malaria prevention education and we built a kindergarten. We swam almost daily after work in a lagoon where a saltwater croc had taken residence. It was huge. In hindsight that was dumb. lol (Did I mention I’m Canadian.) But we were careful. Seeing that animal in nature like that was a once in a life experience. Every night the Chief of our village tried to shoot it but I don’t think they had any luck. One day it was just gone.

We were warned about sharks – saw a few. Had chance to go snorkeling once while there – it was my first time and I have never seen any waters as beautiful as those again. We went at a shipwreck and there was so much life and so colourful.

The Solomon Islanders are a truly beautiful, generous and kind people. It feels like there is an innocence about them but it’s also not a Western culture so it’s just different. They didn’t even use money where we stayed. They share everything. It is a developing nation so expect to rough it. It was quite religious and you need to respect the customs. Women had to cover up. I swam with a sarong on.lol

Honiara is the main ‘city’ and you need to be aware like in any other city. The humidity will knock you out until you get accustomed to it. There is some island superstitions there. My main tip would be to learn as much as you can about the culture and try not to offend. Also, bring a mosquito net.

I was going to visit the Solomon Islands but Not now

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16 Reasons Washington State Is The Worst

16 Reasons Washington State Is The Worst

Washington State is just the worst. Don’t let people fool you when they say “it’s beautiful” or “there’s so much to do” because they are wrong. Don’t believe me? Here are 16 reasons why Washington is just terrible.

1. There’s nothing to do.

You can Google “Things to do in Washington” all you want, but you won’t find anything worth your time.

2. And there’s nothing to see.

Mountains? Boring. Waterfronts? Overrated. There’s nothing special about Washington.

3. The people have no spirit.

What a bunch of bandwagon fans!

4. It rains all the time.

It literally rains every single day.

5. No seriously, it’s always gross out.

It is constantly pouring down rain.

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6. Nothing good has ever come out of Washington.

Microsoft? Lame. Boeing? Don’t care. Starbucks? Who even drinks coffee.

7. The food is just terrible.

This is disgusting.

8. Like, there’s just no variety.

There’s no way this place would ever be successful.

9. The people are completely uninteresting.

10. And it’s so crowded.

Don’t get me started on the traffic.

11. Seriously, don’t move here.

12. Like adventure? There’s none of that in Washington.

Adventure is not out there, don’t go looking for it.

13. It lacks cultural history.

It’s not like most of the cities have Native American names or anything like that.

14. The music scene is practically nonexistent.

Smells like I’m not impressed. Who would even listen to these guys?

15. Honestly, Washington is just not exciting whatsoever.

I’m sick of all this incredible landscape.

16. Not impressed.

Seriously, don’t even bother visiting. You’ll probably be disappointed.

This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.

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Why My Dad is My Dad

He is more than what people call him.

Why My Dad is My Dad

Now growing up, I never really understood how lucky I was until I went to college. When I was younger, I had some sort of resentment towards my dad, because by blood he wasn’t my “father.” I would toss around attitude because that’s just what society drilled in my head. This man wasn’t meant to be my dad.

As I got older, I began loving my dad more because I started to see how incredible of a man he is. My dad always talked to me about God, but in high school that wasn’t really my thing. I was more concerned with tennis, my friends, and boys. My dad kept pressing into me. Talking about Jesus with me at the most random times. One thing was certain, I was grateful because at this point my family was going through difficult times and he exemplified what a man is.

Transferring to Texas State was the highlight of me and my dad’s relationship. I heard all these stories about my peers’ dads. When they would ask me about my dad, they would say “Oh you mean he’s your step dad, what about your real dad.” This really hit a nerve with me. I usually would just tell them that he is MY dad.

Why did it start hitting a nerve, now in my early 20s? Well because I grew up. I would think of my life being my mom’s age when she had me. I couldn’t even handle having a kid. My dad met my mom when I was about 9 months, and I don’t think having a kid was the plan. I don’t think I could ever just put my life on hold for love, but my dad did. He eventually made the best of it. With an angry teenager, he still managed to bring Jesus into my life.

Another thing happened at Texas State, I found Jesus. The man my dad kept telling me about, finally made His way into my heart. I honestly don’t think I could’ve found my Heavenly Father without the help of the father God has placed in my life. There is a reason for everything. My dad is my spiritual leader. Without him, I don’t think I would be so secure with my faith. I can tell my dad to pray for me because I’m emotionally tired and he doesn’t try to pry into my life. He would just tell me he would pray. And in that moment I feel better.

This article this week isn’t about how many shares I can get, it’s about my DAD. My one and only dad that, without a doubt, is always there for me.

Thanks Daddy for loving Christ and loving me.

Thanksgiving Travel Tips

A few ways to make your trip home more enjoyable!

Thanksgiving Travel Tips

With Thanksgiving around the corner, I decided to offer a few tips for travelling home! If you’re like me, then you’ve been desperately counting down the days until it’s time to go home. While some of you may be carpooling home, others may be taking a bus or train. Because I live in San Diego, I have to take a very long trip on the Amtrak consisting of taking both the train and the bus. Regardless of how you’re getting home, it’s good to be prepared for the trip home. With that said, I hope you all benefit from this article.

#1 Pack light!

This is probably the issue I struggle with most when I plan on going home! On the Amtrak, there really isn’t much space available for you to put your luggage. During holiday peak times like Thanksgiving, it’s especially hard to find space. For this reason, I recommend to bring no more than two pieces of luggage with you. I usually bring my backpack and either a large duffel bag or my small suitcase. For some people, that is not enough to hold all their necessities. If this is the case, I recommend that you get to the Amtrak station 2 hours early to check in your luggage. With Amtrak, I believe you can check in two pieces of luggage and you can carry an additional two as carry-on bags. I personally don’t like being at the train station, so I just pack light.

#2 Bring snacks!

If your trip is especially long, then I recommend buying some snacks for your trip! I usually bring two water bottles, a bag of chips, and fruit snacks/gummies. Other snack suggestions include: cookies, trail mix, and granola bars. If you’re driving home, then I definitely recommend snacking on the road to keep you awake.

#3 Bring a blanket/pillow

If you’re in for a long ride on a car, bus, or train, then be sure to bring a blanket and pillow! My train ride is about three hours and I usually don’t fall asleep, but for the second half of my trip, I am on the bus for 5 hours. I usually try and get some sleep on the bus since the lights are off and it’s generally pretty quiet. I often forget my blanket, which is unfortunate since the bus is usually very cold for some reason. If a blanket and pillow seem like a bit much, it also helps to bring a comfy hoodie and a travel neck pillow.

#4 Entertainment

Be sure to bring something to keep you occupied during your trip home. I usually use my phone and laptop the most when I travel home. Listening to music or watching a movie is a good way to pass the time until you get home. I sometimes bring a book or even my knitting when I travel!

#5 Remember to stay charged!

Don’t forget the necessary chargers for your electronics! Always make sure you have your phone chargers, laptop chargers, and whatever else you may need to make sure your electronics don’t die! If you’re travelling on the Amtrak, be sure to take advantage of the outlets on the train and the bus. The outlets on the train are along the wall, and most Amtrak busses have outlets in between underneath the seats. A lot of people don’t know about the outlets on the bus, so be sure to keep a look out for those as well.

I hope my tips helped those of you who are preparing for the journey home! Be sure to travel safe, and I wish all of you a happy Thanksgiving!

FALLing Into Nostalgia

Its always a special time.

FALLing Into Nostalgia

Living in Washington, D.C. is an amazing experience and the city offers so many opportunities that enhance my college experience everyday. Living in the same city as our president and living blocks away from our national monuments is inspiring, and being surrounded by ambitious and intelligent students, professors, and politicians motivates me to be the best version of myself, but still in mid October, I feel as though something is missing from this city.

It’s hard to be homesick in a city as busy and distracting as Washington D.C., but when I realize I still walk to class in shorts and flip flops and when I wake up to dreary, rainy days, I realize how some of the seasonal changes of fall don’t exist in this city and I start to miss the beautiful falls that I experience at home in Fairfield, Connecticut.

I had lived in Fairfield, Connecticut my whole life and it is much further north than D.C. Living in a rural and forest-filled town has spoiled me with the most beautiful and fullest falls that D.C. has deprived me of. I was lucky enough to also have a house in Easton, Connecticut, which was only a town over form Fairfield, but it entailed about a twenty-minute drive. When my mom moved there, I wasn’t ready to accept the changes, but as fall came around, I started to really appreciate the twenty minutes I had to myself in my car driving through the beautiful roads of Easton.

I drove from Fairfield to Easton almost everyday and as I learned the back roads of Easton more familiarly, I started to purposefully drive off-route on my way home from cheerleading practice and silently admire the beautiful fall foliage, cherishing every minute I had to myself in that car. I would roll down my windows a little bit to catch that pleasant fall night smell that was so specific.

Every morning, I would wake up and step outside in my fall boots and light coat, catching the drift of crisp fall air and get into my car to drive to Fairfield again. As each fall morning passed, I was able to watch the leaves gradually change colors and start to cover more and more of the winding roads.

This beautiful drive passed through many farms and local markets that offered fall activities like apple picking, pumpkin picking, and corn mazes. Fall wasn’t fall unless you did at least one of those things and no apple-picking trip was fulfilled without warm apple cider or a pumpkin donut. Although most people only experience the apple or pumpkin picking experience once a season, I was lucky enough to drive by the beautiful apple orchards every day. Some days before school I would even smell the cider donuts and other fall baked goods baking, tempting me to stop in and pick up breakfast before school.

In Fairfield, fall also meant cheerleading practice, Friday night football games, pep rallies, rival high school soccer games, and a lot of school spirit, and without any of that at GW, I start to miss all of what fall entailed and I become a little bit nostalgic. As much as I have fallen in love with D.C., fall just isn’t the same here without the nature, trees, orchards, and school spirit. The closest thing I’ve experienced that relates to fall is buying a pumpkin spice latte from Starbucks, but that just isn’t the same as a fresh pumpkin donut or warm apple cider. As November approaches, and I still have yet to notice any seasonal changes and have yet to participate in a fall activity, I really miss my hometown in general at this beautiful time of the year and would do anything to drive that route from Fairfield to Easton that captured all of the best parts of fall so magically

Source https://www.theodysseyonline.com/15-reasons-washington-state-worst

Source https://www.worldnomads.com/travel-safety/oceania/solomon-islands/before-you-go

Source https://www.theodysseyonline.com/15-reasons-washington-state-worst

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