Can You Paraglide Anywhere? Here’s 4 Things to Look Out For!

Paragliding is one of the most accessible forms of human flight. Paraglider’s are easy to transport, a paragliding wing and harness can pack up into a small bundle which can be carried with ease. Hang Gliders are heavy and take more effort to transport to those remote launch sites. Skydiving requires a plane and launching from extreme heights, so it’s far easier to find somewhere to paraglide than the alternative options.

So can you paraglide anywhere? While paragliding can be done in many accessible locations, you can’t paraglide anywhere. There are some places where you are not permitted to paraglide for your safety, the safety of others or for the privacy of landowners.

Hazards Which You Can’t Paraglide Close To

Paragliding in suburban, built-up areas presents hazards where paragliding must be done from a safe distance. Power lines, roads, tall trees, schools, shopping centres and large car parks must be avoided. Some countries have restrictions in place which don’t allow you to paraglide within a certain distance of these hazards. If your country doesn’t have these restrictions, it’s still worthwhile to be cautious and paraglide from a safe distance.

paragliding restrictions

You Can’t Paraglide Over No Fly Zones

Many areas of government owned land are no fly zones. These include military bases, police land, and the homes of distinguished government representatives. Paragliding over and landing in these areas is not allowed due to privacy reasons, and restrictions on public access.

You also can’t paraglide over or land on designated ‘no fly’ zones. These are usually located close to popular paragliding launch and landing zones. These are usually from home/landowners who seek privacy or have had negative experiences with pilots causing damage to their property. These locations can often be seen on paraglidingmap.com or by talking to a local paragliding club or pilots in the area. Take these into account when planning your flight and look for alternative close-by bombout areas in the event you need to land unexpectedly.

It’s important to take the approach that landowners who haven’t designated their property as a no-fly zone still may not be entirely happy about paragliders flying close over or landing on their property. Don’t fly so close that you compromise their privacy. If you do need to unexpectedly land on private property, quickly pack up your paraglider, ensure you have all your belongings and leave the property at the closest exit.

You Can’t Paraglide in Flight Paths

You can’t paraglide at high altitude in commercial plane flight paths. The reasons for this are fairly self-explanatory – no one wants to collide with a plane! Most paragliding pilots won’t be at risk of flying in these high-up restricted areas, however with excellent thermalling conditions and a bit of bravery, it is possible for an experienced paraglider to reach sufficient heights.

There may be restrictions within a certain radius of airports, as planes will be flying at lower altitude when taking off and landing.

These restrictions differ from country to country, it’s best to consult your local paragliding organisation.

paragliding restrictions

You Can’t Paraglide If You Can’t Launch

Another consideration when choosing where you can paraglide is the opportunities available to obtain lift. Lift is critical for launching and is not able to be achieved anywhere. Lift can be achieved in two ways, the easiest is from wind filling the wing with air. This method enables you to launch a paraglider without running, almost anywhere where wind and a lack of hazardous obstacles are present.

The second place you can obtain lift and paraglide is from a side of a steep hill or cliff. This involves the pilot running up to the ledge and obtaining lift from thermals.

You’ll need wind or thermal activity to launch your paraglider.

Conclusion

Ultimately you can paraglide in many places. It’s a highly accessible form of flight and a fun hobby which can be undertaken in many different places. There’s not too many places where you can’t paraglide, these main areas include flight paths, close proximity to airports, schools, roads, high trees and no-fly zones.

It’s recommended that you check the legalities in your country and the rules and recommendations in your local region, as these can differ greatly. Here are links to some of the national organisations:

  • The USHPA in the United States in Australia
  • The British Hang Gliding and Paragliding Association in the United Kingdom

Also please remember to obey the rules and not paraglide in areas which are off-limits. Not only is yours or someone elses safety at risk, you risk giving paragliders a bad name. Paragliding pilots often depend on the generosity of private land owners who let us launch and land on their property. Let’s be grateful and respectful and not lose these privileges!

Flying a Powered Paraglider

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huntnchick

By huntnchick Follow

About: My name is Janell, I am married and we have one beautiful girl! I have always been crafty as well as my sister. we got it from our amazing mom. I am kind of a perfectionist and I am trying to break free of… More About huntnchick »

My husband has always wanted to fly, but I thought it was far too risky. The opposite was true, flying a powered paraglider can be very safe when you follow the rules. We wanted to put together a tutorial for anyone who has the desire to fly to understand that they really can do it. I will say that these steps are not to replace a real instructor, but that these steps are things to remember, practice, and be familiar with when you are ready to fly.

Step 1: Get Comfortable With Your Machine

The most important thing you need to do is become very familiar with your machine and all the major aspects until you can perform them safely and consistently.

The first 3 parts are:

1- practicing kiting the wing so that you are able to pull it into the air and steer it so that it is straight and level with the ground.

2- Become familiar with the throttle and how to ease into a full throttle and as well as releasing the throttle smoothly. This worked great using tie downs hooked to a soccer goal. It helps you understand the power and feel how a full throttle really feels.

3- And lastly is to wear it on your back and get use to using the throttle while walking around. Since this flying machine is for ‘Foot Launching’ it is important to really become comfortable with wearing it. Going into details on each of these things would be a long tutorial in itself.

Step 2: Get a Good Lay of the Kite

If there is a breeze you need to figure out the direction and angle of it and lay your kite out on the ground so you will be running into the wind. Make sure the ground and path ahead of you is clear of rocks, branches, trees, ditches, cactus, and so on. You want a clear path for you to run as well as where your kite will touch the ground or may touch the ground. Check all your strings and make sure none of them are twisted.With your back to the wind, pull the handles and bring your kite into the air to find the exact direction of the wind as you steer it in order to have it steady. Then let your kite come back to the ground and as the back edge of the kite touches the ground, take a step forward so all the sails are open and facing up. The sails on this kite are the very front edge of the kite, they are square holes that allow the air to flow into the kite. You may need to hand straighten the very edges of the wing. This may take a few times to get it right. The first picture shows the steering the kite and the second picture shows the lay of the kite. Sometimes the white sails would be on top of the blue back edge which is fine as well.

A good lay of the kite will be very helpful and reduce unsuccessful attempts. It is important enough to redo the lay after every failure to take off, even though it is time consuming. It allows the entire kite to come up at the same times instead of being off balanced and very hard to correct.

Step 3: Inspect and Warm Up Your Machine

It is important to inspect your machine every time you fly making sure the gas is on and that it sounds right when you start it up, and do NOT hold the throttle as you start up the machine. Make sure you brace your machine properly when you check the throttle to keep it from spinning on you and having the propeller turn towards you. Listen and make sure it sounds right. Then shut it off before putting it on and getting into position. This also allows you to make sure all the bubbles in the gas line are taken out before you fly.

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Also my husband’s machine decided to take a long time to kill the motor so after he realized it he has been able to judge how much sooner he needs to kill the motor in order to land.

Step 4: Prepare for Take Off

Put on the harness and helmet (is recommended) and make sure they are correct and secure. Then put your machine on your back and make sure you attach the kite to you as well. Then start the motor and stand a little bent over so the propeller angled up and not down at the kite. Once everything is in order you are ready for take off.

My husband uses a helmet that attaches to our GPS’ and it has been great. He pushes a button on the side of his helmet to talk to me and I can track where he is.

Step 5: Start to Run

Look ahead and pick a point you will run towards a long ways off and then pull the kite up and begin to run. Be sensitive to the kite as your touch will also help you know if it is tipping one direction. My husband would look back at the kite but after a lot of practice and a helmet he could feel it coming up and just look up instead. Sometimes looking back would alter the wing and he had more failures to launch from it, but at the same time he was able to take off more because he knew what was happening.

As soon as that kite is up, look up at it, only glancing at where you are going for split seconds. KEEP YOUR EYES ON THE KITE and get the kite straight and level with the ground.

Step 6: DON’T SIT DOWN and Avoid Riser Twist

Once it is level and you are in full control, squeeze the throttle until full throttle (depending on the breeze mph it may pick you up quick, or you may have to run quite a ways.) Once the kite begins to lift, you will have the natural instinct to sit down, DO NOT SIT DOWN! Keep your feet down and be prepared to run again if needed.

The kite will lift and once you are far enough in the air you can sit down. Just like if you stood on a weighing scale and squatted down really quick you will see the numbers jump super high, the movement of sitting down too early will add weight to your body and you can drop altitude and hit your machine back on the ground which can easily break your propeller or more.

We have watched a lot of YouTube videos on Powered Paragliding and there are 2 very common mistakes. The first is to look up at your kite because the kite could be so angled to the side and if your feet come off the ground, your weight will need to swing to center itself under the kite and you will hit the ground. The next thing is to not sit down. We have seen so many videos of people sitting down too early and they break their propellers almost every time.

Once you are in the air you want to avoid riser-twist as well and that is done by letting up on the throttle a bit and turning the natural direction the machine wants to go. With our machine and the direction the propeller turns, he begins to circle to the right. It also keeps you from doing a grandfather clock and sway from side to side. Riser twist is where your kite stays put and you spin around backwards and twist the lines which is very dangerous and you will crash.

Step 7: Flight

Once you are in the air remember to enjoy it. Many people, like I did, believe that if the motor stops you would plummet to the earth. This is not so. This kite has a 6 feet forward 1 foot down ratio so if the motor is idle you will glide down 1 foot for every 6 feet you go forward. The motor can give speed but it is also intended for lift. If you want to go higher you would squeeze the throttle. If the motor were to stop completely you would have time to land. The key factor is to always have a spot to land in sight. Once in the air you can let go of the wing, breaks, and throttle and the kite will glide and you can steer with shifting your weight side to side. So no need to panic if anything comes out of your hand, they will remain in reach to grab again. Although letting go is a hard concept but important to realize.

Keep in mind that there are laws against you flying with in a certain mileage of airports, also watch out for trees, power lines etc. Most importantly you need to fly within your skill level. The very skilled powered paragliders can do awesome tricks and stunts. Those take years of flying to be ready to attempt.

There are rules to always have a safe flight;
1- never fly in wind over 10 mph.
2- never fly with black clouds in the sky.
3- only fly morning and evening since during the day there are thermals.
4- if the air is bumpy that is a sign of thermals and get down.
5- it is better to be on the ground wishing to be in the air than in the air wishing to be on the ground.

An example of thermals is if you took a bucket and put it into water and pulled up, there is a current of water that rushes under the bucket to replace what you took. The air is the same way and the thermals can lift you up and then shove you down. So be smart and don’t fly in thermals. Hangliders use thermals, but powered paragliders don’t.

Lastly be careful flying by mountains or cliffs, because the wind is very different near them since it follows the contour of the mountain. This means that the air can be going straight up or straight down and both are extremely dangerous. The wind that goes up, must eventually come down. My husband flies very high above cliffs and mountains and has even felt the lift and sudden drop of his machine and he says it is a helpless feeling.

Step 8: Landing

As you decided it is time to land find an open area and keep in mind that you want to land into the wind and not with the wind. If you land with the wind, the kite can overshoot you and you may run into it. Like shown here.

As you near your destination kill your motor, you do not want the propeller to catch your wing after you land.

As you near the ground, slide out of your seat so you are in a standing position (even though you are strapped in still)

As you get to 5 feet from the ground you want to begin to pull both breaks down so your hands are level with your hips. This is how you stall your wing and it nearly stops you so that you can land.

Step 9: Packing Up

When packing up our kite, we start by doing a daisy chain knot up from the handles to the kite to keep them from getting tangled and we also have a side pocket in our kite bag that the handles go into. You don’t want the lines to get tangled up, it is a pain to figure out how to undo them.

Where are Paramotors Allowed to Fly in the United States?

So you’ve heard about paramotors. Maybe you even have a friend who flies one. And you’ve heard that they can just unload their stuff and take off from anywhere. Perhaps you’ve also seen those people on YouTube flying their paramotors to McDonald’s and back. And this whole time, you are wondering to yourself, “Can that be legal??” Well, today I’ll answer that question for you.

So, where are paramotors allowed to fly in the United States? Paramotors are permitted to operate pretty much anywhere in the US, with a few exceptions. Paramotors cannot fly within 5 miles of an airport, over populated areas, or in any Class A, B, C, or D airspace. They are allowed in class G and E airspace.

Let’s go into the detail of what this means and take a look at the other rules paramotorists must follow while in the air.

So, They Can Really Just Fly Anywhere?

Back in the day, there were no flight rules. There were just a few crazy inventors trying to get planes in the air. In time, as aircraft started staying in the air, some rules were to keep people safe – both in the air and on the ground.

As the range of aircraft has broadened, and their speed and volume have increased, the rules governing air traffic have expanded.

So to put it simply, paramotors can fly anywhere except where it is specifically written they can’t. They also have to follow all of the general airspace rules, and they have to follow special rules for paramotors.

These limits include visibility requirements, cloud distance requirements, and staying away from airports.

Why the Rules?

Today, the big planes are moving with such speed you might have fewer than 3 seconds to see one coming and react. Small planes are also moving swiftly. With paramotors topping out at about 40 or 50 miles per hour, flyers have little time to react to significant obstacles.

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In the 1980s, the FAA took a serious look at air traffic. They undertook a review of paramotors and other small aircraft traffic like gliders and paragliders. As a result of this review, the FAA made some significant decisions about how paramotoring should fit into the air traffic mix. What they decided was that paramotoring would remain unregulated.

The FAA’s decision to keep paramotors unregulated came because they determined that if paramotorists follow a basic set of rules, then they do not pose a serious enough risk to people and property to require them to have a pilot’s license.

The FAA gave paramotorists the gift of “self-regulation,” which means that a paramotorist is responsible for flying safely and making a lot of judgment calls. It also means that we have a ton of freedom, which we should use carefully.

The key to staying safe on a paramotor lies in following the airspace rules that the FAA has established. Here I will explain them in greater detail.

If there isn’t a rule for your specific situation, that doesn’t mean you are free to do whatever you want. It means you have to make a judgment.

1) Paramotors And Airport Rules

As with many things to do with paramotoring, the use of airports, and the airspace around them is not simple. So, I’ll do my best to explain it as clearly as possible.

Some private airports accept FAA grant money, while others do not. You will need to know if an airport is receiving FAA grants because they impact your rights of use. To find out which airports receive FAA grants you can visit the following page, which give you current and historical grant information:

Airports Without FAA Grants

There is nothing to say a private airport, which does not accept FAA grant money, has to let you use their facilities. If you ask to use the airport and the owner says no, then the answer is no.

Airports With FAA Grants

When an airport accepts an FAA grant they must comply with the Airport Improvement Plan Assurances.

This document says that by accepting an FAA grant, the airport operator must not discriminate against any legal aeronautical activity. This includes paramotoring.

At the same time, this does not mean you can fly your paramotor to, from or around any airport you like.

Why? Two reasons.

  1. The rules also say that an airport operator can limit or prohibit any aeronautical activity if that prohibition is necessary to “serve the aviation needs of the public” or to “ensure the safe operation of the airport.” The airport operator does not decide what is safe and what is not. The FAA makes this decision.
  2. There are also a plethora of other rules that regulate where and when you can use an airport and airspace.

Let’s take a look at those next.

2) Right of Way Rules

As a paramotorist , you have almost the last priority in the skies. The only thing lower than a paramotorist in priority is an unpowered paraglider. Know that it is your job to stay out of the way of every other plane in the sky. As a result, you want to stay away from airports altogether.

Even if you are more than five miles out from a larger airport, know that planes can travel that distance in seconds. Jets are coming in hot and don’t have the maneuverability to just dance around a paramotor that is in their way.

So, it is better to give more substantial aircraft plenty of room and not be anywhere close to them. Remember, it’s not just your life you are playing with, it is the lives of everyone on the ground and everyone in another plane. Even seemingly small things can bring down big planes.

Also, keep in mind the FAA’s nonregulation decision. Paramotors are unregulated because they expect us to regulate ourselves. If we can’t, and cause some horrible, preventable tragedy, that self-regulation will probably be gone in a blink of an eye.

3) Where You Can Fly Rules

Before we get into the detail of Airspace Class rules, there are some general points to make.

Populated Areas

The FAA’s rules on paramotors include provisions that:

No person may operate an ultralight vehicle over any congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or over any open air assembly of persons.

Title 14 – Aeronautics and Space Regulations: PART 103—ULTRALIGHT VEHICLES
Subpart B—Operating Rules

But what exactly does this mean?

Like many of the FAA rules we must follow, it comes down to a case of you’ll need to make a judgment call.

Does it mean that you can never fly over any building ever?

Well, probably not.

Does it mean that you can’t fly over a town?

This is probably closer to what they mean. When you are flying a paramotor, you want to be in sparsely populated areas and have plenty of room to land in case of an emergency.

International And Domestic Notices

Also, know that you can’t fly a paramotor in any airspace that has a current International Notice or Domestic Notice and it is your responsibility to check them before every flight.

These notices replace the previously used NOTAMs or Notice To Air Men. They are issued by the FAA to give a warning about the weather , events, and anything else that a pilot should know about flying in a particular area.

Some aircraft can still fly in an area with an FAA Notice, depending on what type of issue it is describing.

And for those of you who live in D.C., I’m sorry to tell you, Washington, D.C has extraordinarily complicated and restricted airspace regulations. Paramotoring is just not allowed here.

Also, it’s important to know that the airspace directly around the President of the United States is a perpetual no-fly zone, wherever that happens to be.

4) Airspace Rules

Airspace rules are complex, so consider this a simplified version.

In the US, airspace is relatively simple to understand. It is split into classes labeled A through G, excluding Class F, which is not in use in the US. There are also areas of “special airspace.” Within areas of special airspace, the procedures and regulations for flying are still controlled by the lettered airspace classes.

Some of the lettered classes cover areas around airports and others refer to layers of air. There are three main layers: A, E, and G.

Airspace Classes A, E, And G

Right at the ground, there is Class G airspace. This extends from ground level to, but not including 1,200 feet above the ground, although in a few remote regions, the upper limit can be higher. Class G airspace has the fewest regulations and is not covered by Air Traffic Control.

From 1,200 feet above the ground, all the way up to, but not including 18,000 feet above sea level is Class E Airspace. This airspace has a wide range of use and has more rules than Class G.

Finally, everything from 18,000 feet above sea level and above is Class A airspace. Unless specifically authorized, aircraft operating in Class must use Instrument Flight Rules and be under Air Traffic Control.

Airspace Classes B, C, And D

You will find classes B, C, and D airspace around airports managed by Air Traffic Control.

Although there are a few different requirements, for our purposes, classes B, C, and D are all pretty much the same. They are the very controlled airspace around airports that allow planes to fly and land safely in a tight, sometimes overcrowded space.

These airspaces extend all the way to the ground. So the Class E and Class G airspace that would normally be there at the airport is not there. It is replaced by the B, C, or D airspace that is there serving the airport.

Paramotors are pretty much never allowed in Class B, C, or D airspace. This means that they do not need to ever be in contact with air traffic control. This also means that they can’t take off from a traditional airport.

Not that we need to, of course. We can take off in less than five steps from pretty much anywhere else we want.

Paramotor Airspace

So coming back to our discussion on paramotors, paramotors are allowed in Class E and Class G airspace only. This means the very upper limit of where a paramotor can fly is 17,999 feet above sea level. Not that you’re likely to want to go that high, it’s cold and boring up there…

No pilots license is required, in class E or G airspace but you do have to follow all of the Class G and Class E airspace rules as well as the aviation right of way rules.

5) Class G Rules

Air Traffic Control does not cover class G airspace, and it is everywhere that class A – F is not. This class extends from the ground up to, but not including 1,200 feet above the ground. A paramotor can climb this high in just a few minutes.

The rules for Class G airspace in a nutshell thus: You need visibility of at least one mile, and you must avoid all clouds. Simple, right?

Avoiding Clouds

If you are wondering why you need to keep clear of clouds, the reason is simple: everybody wants to avoid collisions. If two planes decided to cross the same cloud at the same time, they would collide. There is no safe way to fly through a cloud on a paramotor.

Now you are probably saying, “Well Zach, when I fly commercially, we go through the clouds….” And you are right. Planes can safely fly through the clouds under certain circumstances.

VFR and IFR

You see, there are two modes of flying: VFR and IFR. VFR stands for Visual Flight Rules, and IFR stands for Instrument Flight Rules. VFR means you need the visibility that I just described. When a pilot doesn’t have that kind of visibility, they can use IFR as their flying mode.

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Aircraft that pass through clouds are operating on IFR. That is the only safe way to go through the clouds. IFR involves many instruments as well as communication with the Air Traffic Controllers.

It is more controlled and it is safe because all of the instruments can let the pilot know exactly where the plane is, and Air Traffic Control can let the pilot know that there are no other aircraft around. No plane is allowed to enter a cloud while on VFR, it must be done while on IFR.

You must be flying VFR, which means that you can do it without most instruments and without guidance from Air Traffic Control. Without IFR, there is no safe way to fly through the clouds and you must avoid them.

6) Class E Rules

Rules for flying in Class E airspace follow a similar pattern to those in Class G. However, they do vary a little, depending on how high you are.

1,200 To 10,000 Feet

Once you are entering Class E (at 1,200 feet above ground level), you need to have three miles of visibility. You also need to maintain 1,000 feet of distance above, 500 feet of distance below, and 2,000 feet of distance to the side of any clouds.

Above 10,000 Feet

At 10,000 feet above sea level, those distances increase further. Above 10,000 feet, you must maintain 5 miles of visibility, and 1,000 feet distance above, 1,000 feet below, and one mile of distance to the side of any clouds.

These distances increase because the airplane speed limit changes at 10,000 feet. Below this altitude, all planes are limited to 250 knots or about 287 miles per hour.

At higher speeds, there is less time to react. A paramotor could be hit by a plane without you even seeing the other aircraft. Or you could see a plane but not have enough time to react without colliding.

7) Miscellaneous Rules

There are a number of other rules you must observe when flying a paramotor and they can all be found in the Federal Regulations, Title 14 – Aeronautics & Space, Part 103 Ultralight Vehicles.

For ease of reference, and so you can review the actual FAA document occasionally, as well as check for updates, I’ve included the relevant regulation numbers

103.21 Visual Reference With The Surface

You must always maintain visual contact with the ground when flying a paramotor. While flying, you cannot ever allow a cloud to get between you and the ground.

103.11 Daylight Operations

Technically, legally, and practically, you can’t fly after dusk or before dawn.

“Dusk” is defined as thirty minutes after the legal sunset of your location and “dawn” is defined as thirty minutes before the legal sunrise at your location.

Why? This all goes back to the Visual Flight Rules mentioned earlier.

If you can’t see, then how are you going to fly VFR?

Not only is your risk for a mid-air collision greater, but as your depth perception is reduced you are at greater risk of hitting something else.

You will also have a harder time finding your landing site. It can get really disorienting, really fast once it is dark.

Oh and it’s illegal. So don’t fly at night.

103.9 Hazardous Operations

The regs also state that you must not operate a paramotor in a way that creates a hazard for other people or property.

Again, there is no detail on what constitutes a hazard, you should just be sensible and use good judgment.

Where You Can Fly

So far we have talked a lot about where you can’t fly, but let’s talk about some of the amazing flying opportunities that are available to you as a paramotor pilot.

Flying on a paramotor, you can do things that pilots flying any other aircraft could only DREAM of doing.

One example is over beach areas. Any pilot can fly over a beach, but they can’t do it very close to the surface. They also can’t breathe the heavy air, smell the sea, or hear the waves crashing below.

The same thing goes for fields. Any pilot can fly over a field, but only a paramotorist can fly closer to the ground, smelling the dirt, the corn, or whatever there is to be experienced there.

I also need to put in a word from sunrises and sunsets here. They are amazing from the air. They are also the best times to fly, as the air is the calmest at these times.

These are all examples of places that few regular aircraft could ever fly. They are also the most exhilarating way to experience flying. Being so close to the ground, you don’t need to be going very fast to experience a really cool flight.

Where You Can Fly From & To

Another amazing thing about paramotoring isn’t just the places you can fly, it is the places you can start flying from. With a paramotor, you can take off in about five steps. Five steps!

This means you can take off from basically any spot where you have permission. Whether it’s a farm, dirt field out in the middle of nowhere, a beach, or on a mountain, you can just go. All it takes is a few minutes to set up your wing and you can be off.

Speaking of permission…

Permission

This is another really important aspect of flying a paramotor. As with anything else, if you don’t have permission to be on someone’s land, then you are trespassing.

The landowner might be just fine with that, but chances are they will not. Always ask first.

Farmers usually have some open space that they might be willing to let you use if you ask. If you offer to get them some aerial photos of their farm, their town, or something else important to them, they might be more willing to let you use their space.

However, lots of land falls into a gray area. In public places, like parks, there might not be any technical legal blockage to you taking off there. But if you start bugging people by taking off there, you will probably get some technical legal blockage enacted to stop you from taking off there.

So you need to be wise. Public land in rural areas, or any field that you have permission to use, are usually the best places.

The “Don’t Be Annoying” Rule

More than anything, as paramotorists, we need to remember, please, please, PLEASE, don’t be annoying That is the quickest way to get paramotoring banned from an area.

Several beaches in California have now banned paramotor flights because the locals got too annoyed by the people flying there.

In general, you should try to help the general public to see paramotoring as something cool to look at from a distance, not something that you dread coming close to your house every time you hear the motor coming in the distance.

My Personal “Don’t Be Annoying” Policy

My “don’t be annoying” policy usually includes the following components:

  1. Don’t litter. This is quite possibly the fastest way to drive locals up the wall.
  2. Know the law. This article is about federal laws and regulations covering paramotors. However, there may be local or state laws that also govern paramotor use. Also, if you are ever trying to fly a paramotor outside of the US, research the local law because different countries can vary widely on what their take is on paramotors. And, if you fly close to the border of the US with Canada or Mexico, be sure to know their laws, just in case you stray into their airspace, or need to make an unscheduled landing.
  3. Don’t disturb any animals. Animals can get freaked out by paramotor noise, and then the owners have to spend time to calm them back down. If it is an animal on a farm, then getting spooked by a paramotor can actually disturb their production, whether that be milk, eggs, etc. Likewise, wildlife can be negatively affected by paramotors. This could become a significant issue if that wildlife is protected or causes some kind of problem as a direct result of your flight.
  4. Don’t fly too close for comfort. While it is true that one of the coolest parts of paramotoring is operating close to the ground, don’t fly too close to people. Don’t fly as close as you possibly can to someone’s crops, either.

Free Flying

So as you can see, it really is legal to fly to McDonald’s on your paramotor, as long as it is not in a very populated area, you are not within five miles of an airport, you are not in Class B, Class C, or Class D airspace, it is during daylight hours, and you have met all of the visibility requirements for the airspace you are using. Pretty cool, eh?

If you are interested in learning how to apply the ins and outs of paramotor rules, you should go take a lesson or tandem flight.

A tandem flight is a great way to get started, as you can ask the pilot all of your questions to your heart’s content and get a taste of what paramotoring is all about before putting down a bunch of money on it.

Related Questions:

Can paramotors be flown close to each other? P aramotors can be flown close to each other. You can fly with your friends as long as you keep a safe distance from each other and are all vigilant for other air traffic. Some groups even put on radio headsets to be able to communicate with each other.

How long have paramotors been around? The first true paramotor was flown in 1979. It had a flight range of about five minutes.

Source https://globalparagliding.com/can-you-paraglide-anywhere/

Source https://www.instructables.com/Flying-a-Powered-Paraglider/

Source https://outdoortroop.com/where-are-paramotors-allowed-to-fly-in-the-united-states/

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