Hiking Accidents Statistics: 18 Facts Trends To Consider (Explained)

Hiking-Accidents-Statistics-trends-facts

Are you looking for hiking accidents statistics facts and trends?

Hiking can be one of the most fun and exciting pastimes, even for people who don’t traditionally love exercise.

As someone who has grown up in the East Tennessee mountains, I know from personal experience just how rewarding it can be to trek the side of a mountain.

Even though hiking is one of my favorite pastimes, it’s also an incredibly dangerous one. While in the mountains, you are exposed to a number of dangerous environments, animals, and physical challenges. This makes falling, and even death, a serious issue.

What are the hiking accidents statistics? In the list below you can find the most common facts about hiking accidents:

  • 57% of fall victims are women
  • The vast majority of hiking fall victims were over the age of 41
  • 42.4% of the injuries are related to ankle joint
  • 0.0064% chance of death while hiking
  • Around 400 deaths in America
  • Yosemite alone averages about 12 to 15 deaths per year due to hikers
  • 95% of all intentional deaths while hiking are from suicides

In this article, we are going to look at key hiking accident statistics. We will look at the two most common forms of hiking accidents, which relate to fall victims and death.

These statistics should not deter you from hiking. Instead, they should encourage you to hike more safely and maturely

Table of Contents

Fall Victim Stats

When you are hiking, one of the most realistic accidents you may find yourself in is falling. Sometimes, individuals simply fall and scrape their knees.

For others, falling can lead to much more serious consequences, like broken bones or even death.

hiking-statistics

Gender

  • 57% of fall victims are women
  • 43% of fall victims are men

In a study that looked at 405 hiking fall victims from Germany and Austria, 232 were female, whereas 173 were males. These numbers lead to 14% more women being victims to hiking fall accidents than their male counterparts.

In addition to gender, age was a really big factor for fall victims as well. The vast majority of hiking fall victims were over the age of 41.

Interestingly, males were more likely to be victims of hiking falls than women whenever they were between the ages of 31 and 40 or over the age of 61.

Shoe Type

Shoe TypePercentage (%)
Ankle-height hiking boots with profiled sole61%
Ankle-height mountaineering boots with a rigid sole12%
Running shoes, sneakers, or trainers7%
Other1%

Shoe type is another factor that seemed to have a large impact on hiking falls. The vast majority of falls occurred for people who hiked in ankle height hiking shoes with a profiled sole.

In fact, a whopping 61% of hiking fall victims wore these sorts of shoes. The least common shoe type to be associated with hiking falls were classified as “other,” likely because most people hike with tennis shoes or hiking boots.

Injuries

Injury LocationPercentage (%)
Ankle42.4%
Head13.4%
Lower leg (not including ankle)10.6%

Finally, the last factor we’re going to look at when it comes to hiking falls is injury location. In almost all of the accidents studied, the injury location could be identified.

In most of these incidents, the injury occurred at the ankle joint. 42.4% of these injuries occurred in this location.

The second most common location for injury was the head. 13.4% of people who fell during hiking injured their head. Finally, 10.6% of people experienced an injury to the lower leg, not including the ankle.

What Do These Stats Teach Us

As a whole, these stats teach us that shoe type plays a large factor in falls while hiking. Although there is a disparity between the genders, it seems that shoe type and levels of fatigue are the two biggest determiners for falling during a hike.

hiking-accidents-statistics-facts-trend

Death While Hiking Stats

Even though you are much more likely to fall than die on a hike, there are a lot more hiking death stats available, likely because death is more commonly reported than falls.

As a whole, there is only a one in 15,700 chance of dying while hiking a mountain. This results in a 0.0064% chance. Shockingly, this is actually higher than your chance of dying while skydiving, which is only a 0.00099% chance.

In other words, you are over 6 times more likely to die while hiking than skydiving. Nevertheless, you probably aren’t likely to die in either.

Between the years 2014 and 2016, there were 990 deaths in National Parks . This comes out to about 330 deaths per year or around 6 deaths per week.

Interestingly, increased visitors do not necessarily result in more deaths. National Parks saw an increase of visits by 8% between 2015 and 2016, yet there are fewer deaths.

Most Common Reasons For Death While Hiking

Death Category in National ParksPercentage (%)
Unintentional53%
Medical22%
Intentional25%

When National Parks look at death in their parks, they categorize them into three classifications: unintentional, intentional, and medical deaths.

Of these three categories, unintentional death is the most common, with about 53% of deaths falling under this category.

Although there are multiple ways you can die while hiking, the most common cause for death while hiking is falling to the ground from a high or slippery location.

In fact, Yosemite alone averages about 12 to 15 deaths per year due to hikers falling off slippery slopes.

In addition to falling, drowning and motor vehicle crashes are also leading causes of death. In National Parks specifically, drowning and motor vehicle crashes are more common than falls, but this is not true for hiking deaths specifically.

Medical Deaths

Although most hiking deaths are unintentional accidents, 22% of them occur due to medical emergencies. Between the years 2014 and 2016, there were about 74 medical-related deaths per year.

About 49% of these deaths occurred while the person was actually engaged in hiking, biking, swimming, or some other activity.

Intentional Deaths

As morbid as it may sound, many people go to National Parks and popular hiking destinations to kill themselves.

95% of all intentional deaths while hiking are from suicides . Between 2014 and 2016, there is about one suicide per week.

What Do These Stats Teach Us

Even though falling is more common than death, you can certainly have a fatal hiking experience.

Falling is the number one cause of death while hiking, making it even more important to stay energized, alert, and wear correct hiking shoes while trekking about.

What Is The Most Common Injury Hikers Experience In Trekking?

What is the most common injury hikers experience in trekking? The most common injury hikers experience in trekking is blisters and sprains, blisters especially. Blisters occur around the hiking boots or shoes most commonly.

These elements are normally not reported and are instead treated with over-the-counter options, such as band-aids and ibuprofen.

As far as more serious injuries, sprains are also common. Sprains can occur in just about any joint, but they are most commonly seen in the ankles while trekking. Ankle sprains can occur whenever a hiker trips, falls, or rolls their ankle while walking.

There are a couple of other super common but low-risk injuries hikers often don’t report. This includes sunburns, bug bites, and cuts.

Once again, hikers don’t report these injuries to hospitals simply because they are low risk, but it is nearly guaranteed that hikers will experience one, if not all, of these injuries during a single hike.

Why Hiking Alone Is Dangerous?

Why hiking alone is dangerous? Hiking alone is a really great experience because it allows you to enjoy nature by yourself. However, it can quickly turn dangerous and sometimes fatal in the case of an animal attack, a human attack, or some other fall and injury.

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Today, the reason why hiking alone is so dangerous is that you are at more risk of experiencing a life-threatening scenario.

For example, animals are not as scared of one person, as opposed to multiple people. This can make you more of a target for an animal attack.

Similarly, women hiking alone are at increased risk of sexual assault since rapists tend to go after solo females.

Aside from attacks from animals and other people, solo hiking is also dangerous because if you get injured, no one is there to help you.

Say if you break your leg, there won’t be anyone to run and get help. Instead, you must figure out a plan by yourself, which can be next to impossible depending on the severity of your injury.

Do Hikers Live Longer?

Do hikers live longer? Yes, hikers live longer. Studies have shown that walking extends a person’s life. Simply walking six hours a week increases your lifespan because it decreases cardiovascular and respiratory disease, as well as cancer.

Even walking as little as two hours a week could extend your lifespan as well.

Because of this fact, hikers tend to live longer. Hikers as a whole tend to be more active, but they also don’t put a lot of strain on their bodies either. Instead, hiking gets your blood pumping without putting your joints and muscles at too much risk.

Not to mention, hiking is considered a relaxing experience. Because it takes you away from the modern stresses of society, including your cell phone, hiking is related to relaxation and lowered stress. Lower stress also relates to a longer lifespan.

What Is The Most Dangerous Hike In America?

What is the most dangerous hike in America? The most dangerous hike in America is that of Mount Rainier. Mount Rainier is the deadliest hike in America because it has led to over 400 deaths in America. This is much higher than the second most dangerous hike, which is the Bright Angel Trail in the Grand Canyon.

What makes Mount Rainier so dangerous is its height, volcano, extreme weather changes, falling rocks, and avalanches. Even experienced hikers can find themselves in a deadly situation while trekking this mountain.

Aside from deaths, all of these situations lead to broken bones, drowning, heatstroke, hypothermia, and suffocation as well. It is recommended if you go on this hike to pack all needed necessities, such as extra clothes, warm clothes, first aid equipment, and a survival book.

How Many Hikers Get Lost A Year?

Unfortunately, it is impossible to give a 100% accurate estimate as to how many hikers get lost every year. That is because some hikers are never found, though it is assumed that they were lost in the woods at some point.

So, how many hikers get lost a year? About 2000 people get lost while hiking in the woods every year. Whenever you get lost, you can experience dehydration, hypothermia, heat exhaustion, and hunger, all of which can lead to death.

To prevent getting lost, experts recommend staying calm, thinking, observing, and planning whenever you think you are lost. It’s also important to pinpoint your location and travel downhill.

Final Thoughts

As an avid hiker myself, I know just how rewarding and life-changing a good height can be. But just as the mountains are beautiful, they are also dangerous and home to some deadly creatures and scenarios. As a result, hiking accidents are relatively common.

Hiking falls, and sometimes death, can occur to even the most experienced of hikers. It is for this reason that you should be cautious and alert on every trial.

It is also a great idea to invest in a good pair of hiking boots to help keep your feet grounded on the mountain.

To paraphrase Jack Kerouac poorly, you can’t fall off the mountain, but you sure can fall down it!

How Many Hikers Get Lost a Year? What to do if You Get Lost

How Many Hikers Get Lost a Year?

Hiking can be a great way to get some exercise and enjoy the solitude of nature. However, if you’re planning on hiking, especially in isolated or remote areas, there are some basic precautions you should take to help prevent you from becoming lost while hiking.

While you might think you would never get lost while hiking, it might surprise you to learn just how many hikers get lost a year?

While the number varies from year to year, on average around 2,000 hikers get lost each year while hiking. Leading to numerous Search and Rescue (SAR) operations being launched to locate and extract lost hikers.

Because of this, we created this how-to guide on the best ways to ensure you don’t get lost while hiking as well as what to do if you do wind up getting lost while hiking.

Why Do Hikers Get Lost?

Perhaps one of the best ways to make sure you don’t get lost while hiking is to learn how other hikers got lost so you can avoid their pitfalls and mistakes while hiking.

Below are some of the most common ways hikers get lost while hiking starting with the most common and ending with the least common.

Did Not Stay on the Trail

The number one way hikers get lost while hiking is by not staying on the designated trail.

So one of the best ways to ensure that you don’t get lost while hiking is to not venture off the trail and to make sure you stay on the designated hiking trail at all times.

While you might think there is no harm in heading off the trail for a short while to check something out, it’s very easy to get turned around and lost while hiking especially in densely forested areas or desolate areas with few landmarks.

Bad Weather or Storms

The second most common way hikers end up getting lost while hiking is due to bad weather or a storm rolling in while there hiking, causing them to become disoriented or lose their bearings.

While this might not always be 100% avoidable as it can be hard to predict mother nature, it’s always a good idea to check the local weather before you head out on a hike to ensure there are no reports of bad weather heading your way.

Falling Off the Trail

Often times while hiking there can be very narrow sections of trail with steep drop-offs or even cliff faces which can pose a serious risk to those hikers that get too close or are not paying attention, causing them to go over the edge or fall of the trail only to become disoriented and lost at the bottom.

So when hiking lookout for any drop-offs or cliff faces and give them the respect they deserve by giving them a wide birth as you pass.

Separated from Their Hiking Group

Another common way hikers get lost while hiking is that they get separated from their hiking group, which unfortunately was acting as their guide and navigation for the hike.

There are two things you can do to help avoid getting in this situation yourself, with the first being to make sure you always stay within visible distance of the party you are hiking with by not getting too far ahead or behind the hiking group.

The second way to avoid getting lost in this way is to never rely solely on someone else for your navigation while hiking, as every hiker in the hiking group should know the trail they are hiking on as well as how to navigate on their own.

Injury

The next way hikers can become lost while hiking is that they become injured or hurt while hiking and can’t hike back out from the isolated area they were hiking in.

While you might not be able to prevent injuries while hiking, you can take steps to ensure if you do become hurt or injured while hiking you don’t become stranded or lost.

The first of these ways is to never hike alone while hiking, that way in case you were to become hurt or incapacitated someone could hike out of the area to go get help. The second way is to always let someone know where you will be hiking and when you plan to return, that way in case you do get injured and don’t return when you said you were going to, someone knows to come looking for you and where.

Hiker Lost in Darkness

Darkness

Hikers can often get lost in darkness and at night while hiking, even if they are generally familiar with the area, as the lack of light can become very disorienting while trying to navigate, potentially causing them to miss specific landmarks or trail turnoffs.

So to make sure you avoid getting lost due to darkness while hiking, don’t get caught on the trails after dark, and make sure to leave plenty of time to get back to the trailhead before the cloak of darkness falls over the trail and causes you to become disoriented or for you to lose your way.

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Failure or Loss of Equipment (GPS)

While this is the rarest way hikers get lost while hiking, failure, or loss of equipment such as a GPS unit while hiking does occasionally happen and can cause hikers to become lost if they don’t have a backup form of navigation or rely too heavily on external equipment for their navigation while hiking.

The best way to avoid becoming lost while hiking due to failure or loss of navigation equipment is to always carry a backup form of navigation in case you lose your primary source. Such as a good old-fashioned topographical map of the area and a compass. However, don’t wait to try and figure out these primitive navigation tools until after you have become lost as it can take a while to learn to navigate with a map and a compass.

What to Do if You Get Lost on a Hike?

According to the US Forest Service the best thing you can do if you get lost while hiking is to actually be prepared for such an event before you ever become lost through advanced planning.

Even if you’re only going on a hike that lasts a few hours, it’s always best to be prepared in case something goes wrong while hiking such as getting injured or lost.

How to Be Prepared in Case You Get Lost While Hiking

  • Always make sure to bring more than enough water and food for your hike so that you can make sure to avoid becoming dehydrated while hiking and to keep your energy up.
  • Have some form of navigation tool with you even if you are familiar with the area or trail such as a compass or a GPS unit. ((Typically your cell phone will not be a good source of navigation while hiking due to the lack of cell phone signal.))
  • While hiking always make sure you have either a topographical map or a trail map of the area you are hiking.
  • Have a small emergency kit with you while hiking including items such as matches, a first aid kit, and a blanket to help you survive overnight if needed.
  • Dress appropriately for your hike by wearing a good sturdy pair of hiking boots or trekking shoes and wearing several layers of clothing that you can shed or add as the weather and temperature dictate.
  • Know the trail you are going to hike before you hike it, by doing some basic research about the trail itself and making sure there are no special warnings or alerts such as bears or flooding that you should be aware of.

4 Critical Things You Must Do if You Get Lost While Hiking

While it’s great to be prepared in case you get lost while hiking, it’s also equally important or even more important to know what to do in the event that you actually do become lost while hiking.

Below are the 4 critical things you must do if you get lost while hiking, to give yourself the best chance of figuring out where you are and getting back to safety.

Don’t Panic and Stop

As with most dangerous or emergency situations, the best thing you can do if you get lost while hiking is to try and stay calm and don’t panic as this can often lead you to make hasty and irrational decisions.

So if you find you have become lost while hiking remembers to stop, stay calm, and try to get your bearings before you do anything else.

Think and Retrace Your Steps in Your Mind

In your mind try to think back to how you got to this point or area if you become lost. Try to picture specific landmarks or unique features of the land such as streams or bodies of water or large rock outcroppings to help jog your memory.

By doing this you might be able to retrace your steps and found your way back to a familiar landmark or trail to help figure out where you are.

Don’t Walk Aimlessly and Use Your Navigation Tools

One of the worst things you can do is just start walking aimlessly with no real idea of where you are or what you are trying to get to. This is often a way to become even more lost and disoriented while hiking because you could be heading even farther away from where you came.

Instead, get your compass, map, or navigation tool out to try and figure out where you are as well as the general direction you have been heading so that you may reverse course to get back to more familiar surroundings.

Make a Plan

Based on your thinking and what you have figured out in regards to your bearing and the general area you believe you are in, use this information to formulate a plan of action on the best possible route to find your way back or to reach an area where you know there will be people and help.

If you cannot come up with a plan or route that makes sense, it’s best to stay put until you do, or until a rescue party is able to find or locate you.

Also as a last resort, you can follow a drainage ditch or stream downhill as this will often lead to a road, trailhead, or civilization. However, this should only be used as a last resort as this can often be a very difficult and challenging path to try and follow.

Jason is an avid lover of camping, hiking, and well just about anything outdoors. He is both a writer and editor for Outside Pulse and has been camping and hiking for over 20 years.

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Hiking Accidents Statistics: 18 Facts Trends To Consider (Explained)

Hiking-Accidents-Statistics-trends-facts

Are you looking for hiking accidents statistics facts and trends?

Hiking can be one of the most fun and exciting pastimes, even for people who don’t traditionally love exercise.

As someone who has grown up in the East Tennessee mountains, I know from personal experience just how rewarding it can be to trek the side of a mountain.

Even though hiking is one of my favorite pastimes, it’s also an incredibly dangerous one. While in the mountains, you are exposed to a number of dangerous environments, animals, and physical challenges. This makes falling, and even death, a serious issue.

What are the hiking accidents statistics? In the list below you can find the most common facts about hiking accidents:

  • 57% of fall victims are women
  • The vast majority of hiking fall victims were over the age of 41
  • 42.4% of the injuries are related to ankle joint
  • 0.0064% chance of death while hiking
  • Around 400 deaths in America
  • Yosemite alone averages about 12 to 15 deaths per year due to hikers
  • 95% of all intentional deaths while hiking are from suicides

In this article, we are going to look at key hiking accident statistics. We will look at the two most common forms of hiking accidents, which relate to fall victims and death.

These statistics should not deter you from hiking. Instead, they should encourage you to hike more safely and maturely

Table of Contents

Fall Victim Stats

When you are hiking, one of the most realistic accidents you may find yourself in is falling. Sometimes, individuals simply fall and scrape their knees.

For others, falling can lead to much more serious consequences, like broken bones or even death.

hiking-statistics

Gender

  • 57% of fall victims are women
  • 43% of fall victims are men

In a study that looked at 405 hiking fall victims from Germany and Austria, 232 were female, whereas 173 were males. These numbers lead to 14% more women being victims to hiking fall accidents than their male counterparts.

In addition to gender, age was a really big factor for fall victims as well. The vast majority of hiking fall victims were over the age of 41.

Interestingly, males were more likely to be victims of hiking falls than women whenever they were between the ages of 31 and 40 or over the age of 61.

Shoe Type

Shoe TypePercentage (%)
Ankle-height hiking boots with profiled sole61%
Ankle-height mountaineering boots with a rigid sole12%
Running shoes, sneakers, or trainers7%
Other1%

Shoe type is another factor that seemed to have a large impact on hiking falls. The vast majority of falls occurred for people who hiked in ankle height hiking shoes with a profiled sole.

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In fact, a whopping 61% of hiking fall victims wore these sorts of shoes. The least common shoe type to be associated with hiking falls were classified as “other,” likely because most people hike with tennis shoes or hiking boots.

Injuries

Injury LocationPercentage (%)
Ankle42.4%
Head13.4%
Lower leg (not including ankle)10.6%

Finally, the last factor we’re going to look at when it comes to hiking falls is injury location. In almost all of the accidents studied, the injury location could be identified.

In most of these incidents, the injury occurred at the ankle joint. 42.4% of these injuries occurred in this location.

The second most common location for injury was the head. 13.4% of people who fell during hiking injured their head. Finally, 10.6% of people experienced an injury to the lower leg, not including the ankle.

What Do These Stats Teach Us

As a whole, these stats teach us that shoe type plays a large factor in falls while hiking. Although there is a disparity between the genders, it seems that shoe type and levels of fatigue are the two biggest determiners for falling during a hike.

hiking-accidents-statistics-facts-trend

Death While Hiking Stats

Even though you are much more likely to fall than die on a hike, there are a lot more hiking death stats available, likely because death is more commonly reported than falls.

As a whole, there is only a one in 15,700 chance of dying while hiking a mountain. This results in a 0.0064% chance. Shockingly, this is actually higher than your chance of dying while skydiving, which is only a 0.00099% chance.

In other words, you are over 6 times more likely to die while hiking than skydiving. Nevertheless, you probably aren’t likely to die in either.

Between the years 2014 and 2016, there were 990 deaths in National Parks . This comes out to about 330 deaths per year or around 6 deaths per week.

Interestingly, increased visitors do not necessarily result in more deaths. National Parks saw an increase of visits by 8% between 2015 and 2016, yet there are fewer deaths.

Most Common Reasons For Death While Hiking

Death Category in National ParksPercentage (%)
Unintentional53%
Medical22%
Intentional25%

When National Parks look at death in their parks, they categorize them into three classifications: unintentional, intentional, and medical deaths.

Of these three categories, unintentional death is the most common, with about 53% of deaths falling under this category.

Although there are multiple ways you can die while hiking, the most common cause for death while hiking is falling to the ground from a high or slippery location.

In fact, Yosemite alone averages about 12 to 15 deaths per year due to hikers falling off slippery slopes.

In addition to falling, drowning and motor vehicle crashes are also leading causes of death. In National Parks specifically, drowning and motor vehicle crashes are more common than falls, but this is not true for hiking deaths specifically.

Medical Deaths

Although most hiking deaths are unintentional accidents, 22% of them occur due to medical emergencies. Between the years 2014 and 2016, there were about 74 medical-related deaths per year.

About 49% of these deaths occurred while the person was actually engaged in hiking, biking, swimming, or some other activity.

Intentional Deaths

As morbid as it may sound, many people go to National Parks and popular hiking destinations to kill themselves.

95% of all intentional deaths while hiking are from suicides . Between 2014 and 2016, there is about one suicide per week.

What Do These Stats Teach Us

Even though falling is more common than death, you can certainly have a fatal hiking experience.

Falling is the number one cause of death while hiking, making it even more important to stay energized, alert, and wear correct hiking shoes while trekking about.

What Is The Most Common Injury Hikers Experience In Trekking?

What is the most common injury hikers experience in trekking? The most common injury hikers experience in trekking is blisters and sprains, blisters especially. Blisters occur around the hiking boots or shoes most commonly.

These elements are normally not reported and are instead treated with over-the-counter options, such as band-aids and ibuprofen.

As far as more serious injuries, sprains are also common. Sprains can occur in just about any joint, but they are most commonly seen in the ankles while trekking. Ankle sprains can occur whenever a hiker trips, falls, or rolls their ankle while walking.

There are a couple of other super common but low-risk injuries hikers often don’t report. This includes sunburns, bug bites, and cuts.

Once again, hikers don’t report these injuries to hospitals simply because they are low risk, but it is nearly guaranteed that hikers will experience one, if not all, of these injuries during a single hike.

Why Hiking Alone Is Dangerous?

Why hiking alone is dangerous? Hiking alone is a really great experience because it allows you to enjoy nature by yourself. However, it can quickly turn dangerous and sometimes fatal in the case of an animal attack, a human attack, or some other fall and injury.

Today, the reason why hiking alone is so dangerous is that you are at more risk of experiencing a life-threatening scenario.

For example, animals are not as scared of one person, as opposed to multiple people. This can make you more of a target for an animal attack.

Similarly, women hiking alone are at increased risk of sexual assault since rapists tend to go after solo females.

Aside from attacks from animals and other people, solo hiking is also dangerous because if you get injured, no one is there to help you.

Say if you break your leg, there won’t be anyone to run and get help. Instead, you must figure out a plan by yourself, which can be next to impossible depending on the severity of your injury.

Do Hikers Live Longer?

Do hikers live longer? Yes, hikers live longer. Studies have shown that walking extends a person’s life. Simply walking six hours a week increases your lifespan because it decreases cardiovascular and respiratory disease, as well as cancer.

Even walking as little as two hours a week could extend your lifespan as well.

Because of this fact, hikers tend to live longer. Hikers as a whole tend to be more active, but they also don’t put a lot of strain on their bodies either. Instead, hiking gets your blood pumping without putting your joints and muscles at too much risk.

Not to mention, hiking is considered a relaxing experience. Because it takes you away from the modern stresses of society, including your cell phone, hiking is related to relaxation and lowered stress. Lower stress also relates to a longer lifespan.

What Is The Most Dangerous Hike In America?

What is the most dangerous hike in America? The most dangerous hike in America is that of Mount Rainier. Mount Rainier is the deadliest hike in America because it has led to over 400 deaths in America. This is much higher than the second most dangerous hike, which is the Bright Angel Trail in the Grand Canyon.

What makes Mount Rainier so dangerous is its height, volcano, extreme weather changes, falling rocks, and avalanches. Even experienced hikers can find themselves in a deadly situation while trekking this mountain.

Aside from deaths, all of these situations lead to broken bones, drowning, heatstroke, hypothermia, and suffocation as well. It is recommended if you go on this hike to pack all needed necessities, such as extra clothes, warm clothes, first aid equipment, and a survival book.

How Many Hikers Get Lost A Year?

Unfortunately, it is impossible to give a 100% accurate estimate as to how many hikers get lost every year. That is because some hikers are never found, though it is assumed that they were lost in the woods at some point.

So, how many hikers get lost a year? About 2000 people get lost while hiking in the woods every year. Whenever you get lost, you can experience dehydration, hypothermia, heat exhaustion, and hunger, all of which can lead to death.

To prevent getting lost, experts recommend staying calm, thinking, observing, and planning whenever you think you are lost. It’s also important to pinpoint your location and travel downhill.

Final Thoughts

As an avid hiker myself, I know just how rewarding and life-changing a good height can be. But just as the mountains are beautiful, they are also dangerous and home to some deadly creatures and scenarios. As a result, hiking accidents are relatively common.

Hiking falls, and sometimes death, can occur to even the most experienced of hikers. It is for this reason that you should be cautious and alert on every trial.

It is also a great idea to invest in a good pair of hiking boots to help keep your feet grounded on the mountain.

To paraphrase Jack Kerouac poorly, you can’t fall off the mountain, but you sure can fall down it!

Source https://www.rvandplaya.com/hiking-accidents-statistics-facts-trends-to-know/

Source https://www.outsidepulse.com/how-many-hikers-get-lost-a-year-what-to-do-if-you-get-lost/

Source https://www.rvandplaya.com/hiking-accidents-statistics-facts-trends-to-know/

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