D&D: An Adventurer’s Guide To Neverwinter

Now that the nights are getting longer and the days are getting colder, it’s time to adventure in the one place it’s Never Winter.

Neverwinter is renowned throughout the realms as the Jewel of the North, Neverwinter is a city that boasts a thriving population in the northern reaches of the Sword Coast. It’s been home to many an adventurer, and from first level to fifteenth, you’ll find no better place in all the realms, as long as your definition of the best place is, next to a magical hot springs river.

Named for the magically heated Neverwinter river that runs right through the center of town, Neverwinter is situated in the Northern Sword Coast near the Neverwinter hills, which lie at the base of Mount Hotenow–where the fire elementals that magically heat the Neverwinter river live.

Other nearby features include the Neverwinter Wood, Neverwinter hike and bike trail, and Neverwinter multi-use outdoor recreational facility.

It’s one of the more well-known pieces of real estate in the Realms, attracting such luminaries as Drizzt Do’Urden, Volothamp Geddarm, and a whole host of other high-level heroes.

It’s also been the setting of a few different video games over the years, most recently the self-titled Neverwinter MMORPG. But Neverwinter has a history of being multiplayer oriented. Something about this jeweled city, this bastion of cosmopolitan civilization in the otherwise untamed North must elicit cooperative vibes–the very first game to feature Neverwinter was called Neverwinter Nights and is almost certainly not the one you’re thinking of:

That’s right, this came out back in the halcyon days of 1991, when the Internet was full of hope and possibility and was basically like a superhighway, but for information. When people could surf in cyberspace to find the digital age at the tips of their fingers…

Seriously–this was published when AOL distributed CD-ROMs, but not with free minutes, with games. Neverwinter Nights, the original, was published in partnership with AOL and is considered the very first graphical MMORPG, predating even Meridian 59. And now that you know that, your indie cred has gone up enough that you can be maybe 62% as cool as those kids up there.

But there was another game that came out which bore the same title.

“With Baldur’s Gate we sparked a roleplaying Renaissance…”

And this was the first big 3-D D&D game. It featured its own suite of multiplayer tools and a plotline that pit Neverwinter’s age-old foes, the Luskans against it. They worked in the shadows to create and spread a magical plague called the Wailing Death, which resisted magical healing and you had to cure by rounding up four special creatures from Waterdeep.

From there you were embroiled in a plotline that pit you against one of the Old Ones–a Sarrukh–in an extradimensional space, accompanied by none other than halfling extraordinaire Tomi Undergallows.

I mean, there were technically other companions, but come on… he has a kukri.

But enough about Neverwinter’s history of multiplayer madness–though it does sort of lend credence to the city’s reputation for being the most cosmopolitan city in the Realms, even Volo agrees, and he’s been in enough places for that to actually mean something–for now, let’s explore the city itself.

Neverwinter

The most prominent features in Neverwinter are the city’s three intricately carved bridges that span the width of the city’s life-giving river: the Dolphin, the Wyvern, and the Sleeping Dragon, each of which is a wonder in its own right. And beneath them, the magic river flows in gentle waterfalls through the city, feeding its gardens.

One of the city’s nicknames is the City of Skilled Hands, stop snickering. That particular epithet, stop snickering, refers to the city’s many skilled gardeners, who ensure that the gardens of the city are colorful and fruitful during the warmer months. And when the nights grow cold, the city is still warmed and its inhabitants enjoy the fruits of their labors, whether the actual literal fruits or the wealth that such exports bring to the city.

There are five main districts in the city (though some of this may have changed owing to the recent eruption of Mount Hotenow).

City Core

This is the governance district. Here the business of running the city is conducted. Castle Neverwinter sits overlooking its city, while around it are such sights and establishments as the Hall of Justice, a temple devoted to Tyr; the Cloaktower, where the city’s mages gather to conduct research and attend their end-of-quarter staff meetings; and the Moonstone Mask, an inn which is reputed to have a brothel tucked away in the back. Of course Ophalia Cheldarstone, the proprietress, runs a tight ship, and these things are likely as not mere salacious rumors.

Beggar’s Nest

With a name like Beggar’s Nest, you’re not exactly expecting a lively, well-to-do neighborhood, and you’d be right. This is a place where the destitute drift. Here people are forgotten and broken and desolate. Even surrounded by the wealth of the city, they have nothing. And just to help hammer the point home, there’s a massive graveyard to the north of this area, which means that somewhere in this district there’s a sign that keeps track of how many days they’ve gone without an undead attack.

It never goes up very high. One of the hardest hit parts of the city when the Wailing Death came to it. And again when the Luskan Orcs threatened it. And–you know, come to think of it, not a whole lot happens here that’s good.

Blacklake District

The other side of the spectrum from Beggar’s Nest. Blacklake is where the wealthy elite of the city dwell. Whether you’re nobility, or simply have enough money to make a member thereof blush, you’ll find opulent houses here. Including, it’s rumored, the fortress-estate of an eccentric Elven wizard, who almost certainly doesn’t have his own private army for perfectly valid reasons.

The Neverwinter Zoo is here as well. No word on whether or not the cages are gilded–but hey, there’s an entire district for that!

Docks

When have a Fantasy city’s docks ever been home to anything other than the criminal element? I mean for all the wealth that flows to the city’s it’s no wonder anyone makes it in the first place for all the gangs, organized crime syndicates, rackets of kobolds/goblins operating literally beneath the notice of the city watch, Zhentarim agents, Luskan provocateurs, and all around bad eggs that you’ll find crime-ing it up in the shadows of the ports.

Which is not to say that boats don’t dock here occasionally. After all, smugglers have to have some place to bring their illicit goods that they sneak into the city.

Peninsula

Home to Neverwinter’s Prison, the peninsula juts out over the water and is incredibly secure. Naturally this is one of the locations that characters in Neverwinter Nights have to travel to, in order to track down part of the cure for the Wailing Death.

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So there you have it. One of the most famous cities in the Forgotten Realms, with a cosmopolitan air that puts even cities like Waterdeep and Silverymoon to shame, it’s a great site for any adventure. You’ve got access to the Sword Coast, to the wild Northlands, and to all manner of other places just begging to be explored.

Ahhh Neverwinter Nights, the GM tools were the perfect way to unleash a horde of 50 dragons upon the characters you talked your soon-to-be-ex-friends into importing onto your custom server (which doubled as their graves.)

Bell of Lost Souls Staff Writer and DM, J.R. covers RPGs of all stripes and on occasion eats sandwiches. You can ask him about either at [email protected]

Adventure Zones

I see this tossed around a lot in videos, but what exactly is it? I know dungeon delves are essentially dungeons, so are these just the names of the areas where you quest in such. Are these instanced areas like DDO’s adventure zones?

Comments

crypticmapolis

crypticmapolis Member, NW_CrypticDev, Cryptic Developer Cryptic Developer › Posts: 240 Cryptic Developer

Adventure Zones are large persistent maps that contain open world quests, events and contests, as well as instanced content and 5-man dungeons. Each adventure zone has its own special story arc, gear, and Foundry content as well.

ranncore Member, Moderators, Neverwinter Beta Users, Neverwinter Knight of the Feywild Users Posts: 2,508

Can you give us some other info on game mechanics? Things like:
What happens if you die?
Are we going to see videos of the cleric class any time soon? Or any new videos?
Can you make named loot in the foundry (even if it has random stats?)
How big are adventure zones? Is it a largely instanced based game, or can I spend hours running from one side of the world to the other without seeing a load screen?
How’s that beta testing coming along?
Can you dual-wield?
Are there proficiency feats, or can anyone equip anything?
I’m sure there’s lots more questions here if you care to look around the forums, it’s been a long time since we’ve heard from you guys. It would be pretty sweet if someone did a website overhaul with all the newest info, or even just made a thread with some of it. It’s nice to see you and thanks for popping in!

Can you guys give us some picture from game sometimes? Even Blizzard give community more info than you guys.

33kel5d.jpg

crypticmapolis

crypticmapolis Member, NW_CrypticDev, Cryptic Developer Cryptic Developer › Posts: 240 Cryptic Developer

Can you give us some other info on game mechanics? Things like:
What happens if you die?

See the death penalty thread.

Are we going to see videos of the cleric class any time soon? Or any new videos?

Yes to new videos, but I don’t know specifics. Those are made by PW staff in a different building than Cryptic.

Can you make named loot in the foundry (even if it has random stats?)

You can make named quest items but nothing equippable. We would like to create a real gear item editor, but that would probably happen after Neverwinter ships.

How big are adventure zones? Is it a largely instanced based game, or can I spend hours running from one side of the world to the other without seeing a load screen?

They range in size but most are very big and provide hours of open world content. You can’t travel seamlessly between zones however.

How’s that beta testing coming along?

The beta start date is dependent on some internal milestones, but we will announce it when it is concrete and unlikely to change.

That’s better than “soon” right?

Can you dual-wield?

If your character meets the requirements, yes.

Are there proficiency feats, or can anyone equip anything?

Most gear is class based and level restricted at the moment.

ranncore Member, Moderators, Neverwinter Beta Users, Neverwinter Knight of the Feywild Users Posts: 2,508

That’s better than soon Okay only one more question puh puh please.

What do you mean gear is class based? Can you be a little more specific? I understand if a wizard suffers from arcane spell failure while wearing plate mail, but. can’t equip it at all?
My newness to 4e might be showing.

That’s better than soon Okay only one more question puh puh please.

What do you mean gear is class based? Can you be a little more specific? I understand if a wizard suffers from arcane spell failure while wearing plate mail, but. can’t equip it at all?
My newness to 4e might be showing.

There is no spell failure in 4e. You “just” get a major penalty to. basically every roll if you use an armor you’re not proficient in. I think that in the game they’ve just thought that each class should have his own armor, which is not a dumb solution.

Dilige, et quod vis fac (Love, and do what you will)

ranncore Member, Moderators, Neverwinter Beta Users, Neverwinter Knight of the Feywild Users Posts: 2,508

There is no spell failure in 4e. You “just” get a major penalty to. basically every roll if you use an armor you’re not proficient in. I think that in the game they’ve just thought that each class should have his own armor, which is not a dumb solution.

Dilige, et quod vis fac (Love, and do what you will)

pilf3r

pilf3r Member Posts: Arc User

That’s better than soon Okay only one more question puh puh please.

What do you mean gear is class based? Can you be a little more specific? I understand if a wizard suffers from arcane spell failure while wearing plate mail, but. can’t equip it at all?
My newness to 4e might be showing.

My guess is that it will be like in many mmo where you get a nice shiney purple armor piece then see it says “rogue” on it in the corner or cleric or fighter etc and this means only that class can equip it.

I don’t want to speculate on what this might mean for the stats and prefixes or suffixes etc

ranncore Member, Moderators, Neverwinter Beta Users, Neverwinter Knight of the Feywild Users Posts: 2,508

Huh? If gear is class based that means a wizard can’t equip fighter armor. That means no spellswords.

ranncore Member, Moderators, Neverwinter Beta Users, Neverwinter Knight of the Feywild Users Posts: 2,508

My guess is that it will be like in many mmo where you get a nice shiney purple armor piece then see it says “rogue” on it in the corner or cleric or fighter etc and this means only that class can equip it.

I’d hate to see it that way. I understand if classes are granted automatic proficiency in armor varieties but players should have flexibility to overcome those restrictions. Like feats.

Huh? If gear is class based that means a wizard can’t equip fighter armor. That means no spellswords.

“spellswords” may be able to use both kinds of armor as a feature. I don’t see gishes coming so soon, though.

Dilige, et quod vis fac (Love, and do what you will)

ranncore Member, Moderators, Neverwinter Beta Users, Neverwinter Knight of the Feywild Users Posts: 2,508

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The point is that there is no such class as a spellsword in my player’s handbook and certainly not here in NWO yet, but the flexibility of the rules (in the handbook, and hopefully here) allows me to take an existing class, like wizard, and make it into what I want.

Restricting armor to certain classes takes away a vital part of the dungeons and dragons experience. The ability to make what you want out of what you’re given. To play a class successfully outside of its intended role. I don’t mind having an armor penalty, I can weigh costs and benefits myself. But taking away the option completely? That’s taking away the DnD.

pilf3r

pilf3r Member Posts: Arc User

I’d hate to see it that way. I understand if classes are granted automatic proficiency in armor varieties but players should have flexibility to overcome those restrictions. Like feats.

I am hoping the same thing, same way I am hoping you can twf with any class as long as you have a “feat” for it. The thing that worries me is how C says “requirements” as that can be taken in many ways both good and bad lol

Alright, folks, be happy Mapolis popped in and shared this info. Don’t take a mile from a given inch if you will.

The topic of this thread is “Adventure Zones” so we’re sticking to that. Of course thank you very much for your contributed answers Mapolis!

If users want to ask other questions, they are either free to make more broad threads covering it, or ask directly on the renamed Ask Stormshade (Devs) now called Ask Cryptic/PWE about Neverwinter

Edit: But I’ll close out the questions here. In follow up (checks to see what is shown,) yes it’s MMO-class assigned. So if you are a listed class, you can use items that are assigned to that class only. If there are other “qualifiers” needed for items is unknown but it hasn’t been shown in videos yet.

The point is that there is no such class as a spellsword in my player’s handbook and certainly not here in NWO yet, but the flexibility of the rules (in the handbook, and hopefully here) allows me to take an existing class, like wizard, and make it into what I want.

Restricting armor to certain classes takes away a vital part of the dungeons and dragons experience. The ability to make what you want out of what you’re given. To play a class successfully outside of its intended role. I don’t mind having an armor penalty, I can weigh costs and benefits myself. But taking away the option completely? That’s taking away the DnD.

Edit: Spellswords are in the FRPG. No indication has been made that this has been ported over to this MMO or on any wishlist. If it is done, no video has ever shown a paper doll slot item for multiple classes, so items very likely would be made exclusively for the Spellsword and not available for other characters.

Can you guys give us some picture from game sometimes? Even Blizzard give community more info than you guys.

I believe you mean gives the community and not gave the community? Did you go to the Home Page and check the drop down Media Section? Have you looked in the News Archive for things listed elsewhere? 64 items in Media before the News Blog and Archive links to other things is not shabby for something all but completely redone a year ago in 2011, having a completely new link up to PWE, and then a new forum software upgrade (as well as them working on the game too!)

Comparing a #1 mufti-year bestseller released game to an Alpha-state game is unbalanced. Unless you can literally show me the Alpha State of their site and released amount of content pics/vids, it’s not a fair comparison. So, let’s bring up some MMO Alpha and Pre-Alpha state games that have not entered Beta and see what they show.

    is in Pre-Alpha and has a few pics and vids. They haven’t responded in 16 days where our news update by Trailturtle now are several days at most. (See Dev Tracker for comfirmation.)
    is in Alpha and has a video and a few screenshots, but that’s it. has about 5 videos and a scattering of pics (but what is there is superb) as well as a neatly organized forum in Alpha second phase. Their info section appears to be a patch notes made public most of the time. has several videos and a lot of screenshots but it’s hard to say what’s next as it’s suggested the community will “vote on it” but not sure how well that will work if they don’t “like it enough on Steam first.” is the exception to the norm with ridiculously high pics, vids, info on specs and openly stating they are in Closed Alpha (like Friends and Family,) but they are one of the top funded gaming companies in the world. But don’t state I didn’t include a big mega title. Even they have problems with long-running titles like NBA Live 13 being canceled . HAs been in Alpha for over 2 years and has released it’s 11th Build, and is an Independent Open-Sourced Game. They have about 170 concept and game screenshots, a very nice Text FAQ, a number of community and interview links, but I could not clearly find a single video clip for all their years on their site except on the developer’s report here and here . Youtube however is another story,
  • We’re ending these examples with Inovae’s Infinity which has been trying to develop this since 2004 to give thanks for these companies and their funding and their crew like Cryptic while people bemoan “two long years.” Be grateful they have the funding and support other companies just never get or struggle for years for a single update to their development step. That written, the site’s details are amazingly incredible and I personally thank all the volunteers and part time workers who managed to make it what it is.

And finally, as to whether anything should or shouldn’t be released to test at a certain phase, Gamasutra did a bang-up article explaining that.

That should cover it but if any of you want better examples on Alpha/Pre-Alpha find your own then. on another thread please. This is Adventure Zones.

D&D: An Adventurer’s Guide To Neverwinter

Now that the nights are getting longer and the days are getting colder, it’s time to adventure in the one place it’s Never Winter.

Neverwinter is renowned throughout the realms as the Jewel of the North, Neverwinter is a city that boasts a thriving population in the northern reaches of the Sword Coast. It’s been home to many an adventurer, and from first level to fifteenth, you’ll find no better place in all the realms, as long as your definition of the best place is, next to a magical hot springs river.

Named for the magically heated Neverwinter river that runs right through the center of town, Neverwinter is situated in the Northern Sword Coast near the Neverwinter hills, which lie at the base of Mount Hotenow–where the fire elementals that magically heat the Neverwinter river live.

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Other nearby features include the Neverwinter Wood, Neverwinter hike and bike trail, and Neverwinter multi-use outdoor recreational facility.

It’s one of the more well-known pieces of real estate in the Realms, attracting such luminaries as Drizzt Do’Urden, Volothamp Geddarm, and a whole host of other high-level heroes.

It’s also been the setting of a few different video games over the years, most recently the self-titled Neverwinter MMORPG. But Neverwinter has a history of being multiplayer oriented. Something about this jeweled city, this bastion of cosmopolitan civilization in the otherwise untamed North must elicit cooperative vibes–the very first game to feature Neverwinter was called Neverwinter Nights and is almost certainly not the one you’re thinking of:

That’s right, this came out back in the halcyon days of 1991, when the Internet was full of hope and possibility and was basically like a superhighway, but for information. When people could surf in cyberspace to find the digital age at the tips of their fingers…

Seriously–this was published when AOL distributed CD-ROMs, but not with free minutes, with games. Neverwinter Nights, the original, was published in partnership with AOL and is considered the very first graphical MMORPG, predating even Meridian 59. And now that you know that, your indie cred has gone up enough that you can be maybe 62% as cool as those kids up there.

But there was another game that came out which bore the same title.

“With Baldur’s Gate we sparked a roleplaying Renaissance…”

And this was the first big 3-D D&D game. It featured its own suite of multiplayer tools and a plotline that pit Neverwinter’s age-old foes, the Luskans against it. They worked in the shadows to create and spread a magical plague called the Wailing Death, which resisted magical healing and you had to cure by rounding up four special creatures from Waterdeep.

From there you were embroiled in a plotline that pit you against one of the Old Ones–a Sarrukh–in an extradimensional space, accompanied by none other than halfling extraordinaire Tomi Undergallows.

I mean, there were technically other companions, but come on… he has a kukri.

But enough about Neverwinter’s history of multiplayer madness–though it does sort of lend credence to the city’s reputation for being the most cosmopolitan city in the Realms, even Volo agrees, and he’s been in enough places for that to actually mean something–for now, let’s explore the city itself.

Neverwinter

The most prominent features in Neverwinter are the city’s three intricately carved bridges that span the width of the city’s life-giving river: the Dolphin, the Wyvern, and the Sleeping Dragon, each of which is a wonder in its own right. And beneath them, the magic river flows in gentle waterfalls through the city, feeding its gardens.

One of the city’s nicknames is the City of Skilled Hands, stop snickering. That particular epithet, stop snickering, refers to the city’s many skilled gardeners, who ensure that the gardens of the city are colorful and fruitful during the warmer months. And when the nights grow cold, the city is still warmed and its inhabitants enjoy the fruits of their labors, whether the actual literal fruits or the wealth that such exports bring to the city.

There are five main districts in the city (though some of this may have changed owing to the recent eruption of Mount Hotenow).

City Core

This is the governance district. Here the business of running the city is conducted. Castle Neverwinter sits overlooking its city, while around it are such sights and establishments as the Hall of Justice, a temple devoted to Tyr; the Cloaktower, where the city’s mages gather to conduct research and attend their end-of-quarter staff meetings; and the Moonstone Mask, an inn which is reputed to have a brothel tucked away in the back. Of course Ophalia Cheldarstone, the proprietress, runs a tight ship, and these things are likely as not mere salacious rumors.

Beggar’s Nest

With a name like Beggar’s Nest, you’re not exactly expecting a lively, well-to-do neighborhood, and you’d be right. This is a place where the destitute drift. Here people are forgotten and broken and desolate. Even surrounded by the wealth of the city, they have nothing. And just to help hammer the point home, there’s a massive graveyard to the north of this area, which means that somewhere in this district there’s a sign that keeps track of how many days they’ve gone without an undead attack.

It never goes up very high. One of the hardest hit parts of the city when the Wailing Death came to it. And again when the Luskan Orcs threatened it. And–you know, come to think of it, not a whole lot happens here that’s good.

Blacklake District

The other side of the spectrum from Beggar’s Nest. Blacklake is where the wealthy elite of the city dwell. Whether you’re nobility, or simply have enough money to make a member thereof blush, you’ll find opulent houses here. Including, it’s rumored, the fortress-estate of an eccentric Elven wizard, who almost certainly doesn’t have his own private army for perfectly valid reasons.

The Neverwinter Zoo is here as well. No word on whether or not the cages are gilded–but hey, there’s an entire district for that!

Docks

When have a Fantasy city’s docks ever been home to anything other than the criminal element? I mean for all the wealth that flows to the city’s it’s no wonder anyone makes it in the first place for all the gangs, organized crime syndicates, rackets of kobolds/goblins operating literally beneath the notice of the city watch, Zhentarim agents, Luskan provocateurs, and all around bad eggs that you’ll find crime-ing it up in the shadows of the ports.

Which is not to say that boats don’t dock here occasionally. After all, smugglers have to have some place to bring their illicit goods that they sneak into the city.

Peninsula

Home to Neverwinter’s Prison, the peninsula juts out over the water and is incredibly secure. Naturally this is one of the locations that characters in Neverwinter Nights have to travel to, in order to track down part of the cure for the Wailing Death.

So there you have it. One of the most famous cities in the Forgotten Realms, with a cosmopolitan air that puts even cities like Waterdeep and Silverymoon to shame, it’s a great site for any adventure. You’ve got access to the Sword Coast, to the wild Northlands, and to all manner of other places just begging to be explored.

Ahhh Neverwinter Nights, the GM tools were the perfect way to unleash a horde of 50 dragons upon the characters you talked your soon-to-be-ex-friends into importing onto your custom server (which doubled as their graves.)

Bell of Lost Souls Staff Writer and DM, J.R. covers RPGs of all stripes and on occasion eats sandwiches. You can ask him about either at [email protected]

Source https://www.belloflostsouls.net/2021/11/dd-an-adventurers-guide-to-neverwinter.html

Source https://forum.arcgames.com/neverwinter/discussion/470007/adventure-zones

Source https://www.belloflostsouls.net/2021/11/dd-an-adventurers-guide-to-neverwinter.html

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